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Old Posted Dec 17, 2022, 4:34 AM
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Casper, WY: Downtown

Casper is a city in central Wyoming, and is the seat of Natrona County. The population is around 60,000. Casper is the second largest city in Wyoming, after the capital of Cheyenne.

Casper was founded in 1887, near the decommissioned Fort Caspar, which protected pioneers traveling the Oregon Trail, California Trail, and Mormon Trail through the area. The town was a sheep and cattle ranching center from its founding. It also quickly became an oil center, with the first oil refinery opening in 1895.

The first big oil boom occurred from 1914 to 1925, resulting in 600% increase in population between 1910 and 1930, from around 2,600 to 16,600. The economy crashed in the mid- to late 1920s, bringing a recession before the Great Depression began.

Another small oil boom took place in the 1950s. Then, a bigger oil boom occurred in the 1970s, which continued through the 1980s and into the 1990s. After the collapse of the oil economy in Casper in the 1990s, coalbed methane drilling in late 1990s helped stabilize the economy and population.

Since the last recession in the 1990s, Casper has diversified. It is the center of commerce and industry for much of Wyoming. Casper is also still a center for oil and ranching for the state.

The oil booms over the last 100-plus years has resulted in an excellent mix of arhcitectural styles. Many of Casper's oldest buildings Downtown date from the first oil boom in the 1910s and 1920s, and are generally Neoclassical in style. There are then some buildings from the 1950s. Casper has an impressive number of Modernist buildings for a small city, and for a city in the Interior West and on the edge of the Great Plains, due to the oil boom in the 1970s. Several Postmodern office midrises dot Downtown, which also date to the last big oil boom.


The Natrona County Courthouse, on Center Street. The courthouse was built in 1940.



The Dick Cheney Federal Building, on B Street. The structure was built in 1970.



The Pioneer Monument, in Pioneer Park on Center Street. The monument was erected in 1911, and dedicated to the pioneers who travelled the Oregon Trail, which passed through the county in the 1800s.



"20% Chance of Flurries", on Center Street by Pioneer Park. The sculpture was dedicated in 2006, and honors the dedication and lifestyle of ranching.



The Ohio Oil Company Building, on Wolcott Street. The structure was built in 1949, and was also used by the Marathon Oil Company.



The Intermountain Building, on Wolcott Street at A Street. The structure was built in 1919.



The Burlington Railroad Station, on C Street at Wolcott Street. The railroad station was built in 1916.



The First Interstate Bank Building, on Wolcott Street at 1st Street. The highrise was built in 1956.



The Chief Washakie statue, at 1st & Wolcott Streets. The statue was dedicated in 1996.



Casper's most distinctive building is the old Wyoming National Bank, now a branch of Wells Fargo Bank. The bank was constructed in 1964, and was designed by Charles Deaton. The tower is was built in 1968, and is 177 feet tall, making it the tallest structure in Casper.



The Casper Federal Building, on Wolcott Street. The courthouse was built in 1932.



The Wyoming National Bank Building, on 2nd Street. The structure was built in 1920.



Buildings on Durbin Street.



The Wolcott Galleria, on Wolcott Street. The structure was built in 1952.



Buildings on 2nd Street. On the right is Lou Taubert Ranch Outfitters.



Lou Taubert Ranch Outfitters, on 2nd Street. The building housing the store was constructed in 1907, with additional floors in 1925. The Modernist façade dates to 1954.



Lou Taubert's was established 1919 in Fort Laramie, with a branch store in Casper established in 1947.



The current store opened in 1964, and is one of the premier outfitting stores for ranchers and farmers in the Interior West. The store also caters to tourists with cowboy gear.



Buildings on 2nd Street.



The Becklinger Building, on 2nd Street. The structure was built in 1922.



First United Methodist Church, on 2nd Street. The church was built in 1951.



Rialto Theatre, on 2nd Street. The theater was built in 1921.



Buildings on 2nd Street. On the left is the old Woolworth's store, built in 1917.



The Townsend Building, on Center Street at 2nd Street. The structure was built in 1903, and remodeled in the Art Deco style in 1934.



The Petroleum Building, on 2nd Street at Center Street. The highrise was built in 1957.



The Consolidated Royalty Building, on Center Street. The structure was built in 1918.



The America Luxury Movie Palace, on Center Street. The theater was built in 1920.



The old Virginia Hotel, on 1st Street. The structure was built in 1915.



The Casper Business Center, on 1st Street at David Street. The structure was built in 1981.



The Masonic Temple on Center Street. The temple was built in 1914.



The old Townsend Hotel, on Center Street. The hotel was built in 1923, and is now the Townsend Justice Center.



The First & Center Building, on Center Street. The highrise was built in 1954.



The old Elkhorn Saloon, on Center Street. The terra cotta building was completed in 1900.



A steakhouse on Center Street. The structure was built in 1915.



The Goodstein Building, on Center Street. The structure was built in 1961.



An office building on Midwest Avenue at Center Street. The structure was built in 1961.



Buildings on Center Street.



A building on Center Street.



A bar on Center Street.



The Casper Elks Lodge, on 7th Street. The lodge was built in 1922.



St. Anthony's Catholic Church, on Center Street. The church was built in 1920.

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  #2  
Old Posted Dec 17, 2022, 6:54 AM
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Cool!
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Old Posted Dec 17, 2022, 3:06 PM
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Neat!
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Old Posted Dec 17, 2022, 4:42 PM
Dallas Snob Dallas Snob is offline
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Not trying to burst your bubble, buuuut;

Low-rise buildings are defined as buildings with 4 floors or under. Mid-rise buildings are defined as buildings that have between 5 to 12 floors. High-rise buildings are defined as buildings that have 13 floors or above. Skyscrapers are buildings with over 40 floors and are considered part of the high-rise category.
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Old Posted Dec 17, 2022, 5:54 PM
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^or you could say: ‘Wow you always do so much research in all of your threads. Thanks so much for showing us a place rarely or never seen here.’
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Old Posted Dec 18, 2022, 10:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dallas Snob View Post
Not trying to burst your bubble, buuuut;

Low-rise buildings are defined as buildings with 4 floors or under. Mid-rise buildings are defined as buildings that have between 5 to 12 floors. High-rise buildings are defined as buildings that have 13 floors or above. Skyscrapers are buildings with over 40 floors and are considered part of the high-rise category.
To you maybe. It's very different in the development/construction world, which uses building codes.

Good pics of a place we don't see much.
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Old Posted Dec 19, 2022, 12:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xzmattzx View Post

Casper's most distinctive building is the old Wyoming National Bank, now a branch of Wells Fargo Bank. The bank was constructed in 1964, and was designed by Charles Deaton. The tower is was built in 1968, and is 177 feet tall, making it the tallest structure in Casper.


This almost looks like something that could be built today!
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  #8  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2022, 6:34 PM
RockMont RockMont is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dallas Snob View Post
Not trying to burst your bubble, buuuut;

Low-rise buildings are defined as buildings with 4 floors or under. Mid-rise buildings are defined as buildings that have between 5 to 12 floors. High-rise buildings are defined as buildings that have 13 floors or above. Skyscrapers are buildings with over 40 floors and are considered part of the high-rise category.
According to your definitions, this awesome little city has plenty of mid-rises
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Old Posted Dec 19, 2022, 8:22 PM
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Great Post

I enjoyed my tour of beautiful Casper! Thanks for the posting.
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  #10  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2022, 5:16 AM
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Thanks for the tour! Never seen Casper on here.


Amazing that the building actually kinda resembles Dick Cheney

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  #11  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2022, 12:00 PM
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Nice photos, but I'd have a nervous breakdown if I lived in a place like that. There isn't enough Prozac that could keep me going.

Then again, the people who live in Wyoming are probably like the cowboys in the Pace Picante Sauce commercial and exclaim: "New York City?"

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Last edited by JMKeynes; Dec 21, 2022 at 3:33 PM.
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Old Posted Dec 21, 2022, 3:45 PM
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^ don't places like casper, cheyenne, ketchum and tahoe and the like have a severe housing crisis because errybody and the one percenters want to move there?

i thought i read that?

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Old Posted Jan 5, 2023, 4:06 AM
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Ncf
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Old Posted Jan 5, 2023, 4:13 AM
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Gotta say, looks pretty depressing.

Has that TX panhandle vibes. I bet you the same wind and dust, just colder.
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  #15  
Old Posted Jan 13, 2023, 4:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dallas Snob View Post
Not trying to burst your bubble, buuuut;

Low-rise buildings are defined as buildings with 4 floors or under. Mid-rise buildings are defined as buildings that have between 5 to 12 floors. High-rise buildings are defined as buildings that have 13 floors or above. Skyscrapers are buildings with over 40 floors and are considered part of the high-rise category.
I went with the unofficial definitions and went by common-man language. These buildings were highrises compared to whatever else you see in the middle of nowhere in Wyoming. They aren't tall by Manhattan or Dubai or Shanghai standards, but they are tall here.

Conversely, would anyone call a 5-story building in Midtown Manhattan a midrise, or call a 13-story building in Midtown Manhattan a highrise? Those would be pretty small compared to their neighbors, despite being technically correct. The reality is that a highrise in New York City has to be much taller than 13 floors for a regular guy on the street to call it a highrise.
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Old Posted Jan 21, 2023, 2:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plinko View Post
^or you could say: ‘Wow you always do so much research in all of your threads. Thanks so much for showing us a place rarely or never seen here.’
I like putting that research in!

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMKeynes View Post
Nice photos, but I'd have a nervous breakdown if I lived in a place like that. There isn't enough Prozac that could keep me going.

Then again, the people who live in Wyoming are probably like the cowboys in the Pace Picante Sauce commercial and exclaim: "New York City?"

I probably wouldn't like living in Casper. It is too isolated from a lot of stuff that I have grown up with. It's a really small city in the middle of nowhere. Cheyenne, on the other hand, is pretty well connected with the Front Range of Colorado, and actually would be a nice place to live and get the balance between a quiet city and the bustle of a large metropolitan area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrnyc View Post
^ don't places like casper, cheyenne, ketchum and tahoe and the like have a severe housing crisis because errybody and the one percenters want to move there?

i thought i read that?

Lake Tahoe, Boise, and parts of Montana have seen a huge increase in housing prices, from Californians moving there (at least in Idaho and Montana's cases), and it appeared that there was some "Californization" of Cody, Wyoming, taking place. I don't know if that is the case with Casper and Cheyenne, though. Cheyenne may be getting people moving up from Colorado. Casper seems to be moving along at its own pace.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Gotta say, looks pretty depressing.

Has that TX panhandle vibes. I bet you the same wind and dust, just colder.
I can understand that. Wind sweeping across the high plains seems to be a common thing in the eastern half of Wyoming. Winters in Wyoming must be pretty long and depressing.
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  #17  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2023, 4:44 AM
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Nice photos and history of a State and city rarely seen on SSP!
Does Casper have any vibrant main street? Or an entertainment strip with cluster of bars/restaurants?
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  #18  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2023, 3:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Wigs View Post
Nice photos and history of a State and city rarely seen on SSP!
Does Casper have any vibrant main street? Or an entertainment strip with cluster of bars/restaurants?
I don't know if there was any nightlife area there, having just passed through on my way to Yellowstone N.P. I saw some restaurants scattered on different blocks that could've been good bars at night, but who knows.

The vibrant main street was definitely 2nd Street between David Street and Durbin Street. It had the most pedestrian activity as I walked around, and had some good vehicle traffic, and was manicured for pedestrians. If you zoom in on it in Google Maps, you can see how the street curves back and forth, presumably not only for traffic calming, but to make room for flower beds and whatnot.
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