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  #1  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2016, 3:31 AM
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[Ancaster] The Stone Lofts | ? | 3 fl | Proposed

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  #2  
Old Posted Nov 13, 2016, 6:07 PM
BaconPoutine BaconPoutine is offline
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Is that exterior finish going to be some cheap stone veneer?

I don't hate the design. Good scale, good density, no ridiculous setback. Where's the parking?
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  #3  
Old Posted Nov 14, 2016, 3:34 PM
NortheastWind NortheastWind is offline
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I wonder why the conceptual drawing has the house next door up for sale?
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  #4  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2016, 3:10 PM
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Hamilton Community News: Condo project replaces former medical office plan for Wilson Street property

By Kevin Werner | December 16, 2016

The owners of an unusual parcel of land on Wilson Street have finally settled on building a condominium complex after all.

Sonoma Homes a few years ago had initially proposed a residential development at 125 Wilson Street East. But the developers changed their minds and went with a medical clinic and business office complex for the 496-square metre “awkward” triangle-shaped property that branches off between Dalley Drive and Wilson Street, prior to Jerseyville Road.

After a 2015 Ontario Municipal Board agreement with a nearby property owner, Sonoma Homes was ready to build the medical office. But nothing happened after over a year of planning.

There were “no takers” say the developers for the medical building.

Now Sonoma Homes is proposing a three-story, or 10.5 metre-high condominium building with 19 units. The proposal will need another rezoning approval – from commercial to residential – by council.

David Premi, architect and principal of DPAI, told members of the Ancaster Community Council earlier this month the project will serve as a “gateway building” into the downtown.

It has been designed, he said, to reflect the historical buildings already within Ancaster.

He described the units as “high end” with balconies that incorporated tempered glass in their design.

“These are quality units,” he said.

“We are not trying to do anything that does not conform,” he added. “We are really serious and sincere about trying to create something that is rooted in Ancaster.”

There will be 31 underground parking spots, and seven surface parking areas. He said there will be no further trees cut down, while trees and shrubs will be planted along Wilson Street. A tree study found there were no endangered butternut trees on the property, say officials.

Premi said residents living on the other side of Dalley Drive will have a barrier of trees to block out the development.  There is also a private open space area that the developers purchased from the city.

Premi said the condominium complex has been “articulated” into three structures to fit into the surrounding area.

“What this does is gives the impression of three smaller buildings to bring down the scale (of the project),” he said.

A few Ancaster members were concerned the development would add to the rising traffic congestion along Wilson Street, but Premi disagreed.
“I don’t think it will generate that much traffic,” he said.

There were questions about drainage, but Premi said water from the roof and any surface water will be drained into an underground retention tank, which will then slowly release the water into the storm sewer preventing any flooding issues.

“We have made significant improvement to the drainage,” he said.

The developers did agree to remove the sign for a business office now located on the property.

The Official Plan and rezoning applications could be ready for the city’s planning committee in early 2017 for review. Premi said the developer expects to request six variances for the project relating to lot coverage.
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  #5  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2016, 11:21 PM
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Dr Awesomesauce Dr Awesomesauce is offline
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Seems pretty okay, I guess. The lions are a nice touch...
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  #6  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2016, 12:12 AM
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King&James King&James is offline
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Originally Posted by Dr Awesomesauce View Post
Seems pretty okay, I guess. The lions are a nice touch...
yes they are native to the area
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  #7  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2016, 4:01 AM
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ScreamingViking ScreamingViking is offline
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yes they are native to the area
They were native to Tony Creek. They've extended their range.
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  #8  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2018, 1:47 AM
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OMB sides with developer on Wilson Street condo project

https://www.thespec.com/news-story/8...condo-project/

The Ontario Municipal Board has upheld the appeal of a developer to build a 19-unit condominium development on Wilson Street in Ancaster.

Sharyn Vincent, chair of the OMB who heard the appeal last fall in Dundas, said in a statement the proposed development "conforms to and implements the (official plan) intensification goals adopted in conformity with the Provincial Policy Statement, by adding range and mix of housing forms in an area designated for intensification."

In her nine-page decision released Dec. 29, 2017, Vincent said the proposal — by Sonoma Homes on the 4,473-square-metre triangle-shaped property at 125 Wilson St. and Dalley Drive — also conforms to the city's community nodes policy by "adding to the existing range of built forms, enriching the urban streetscape."


Vincent dismissed the city's planning witness, Allan Ramsay, a land use planner, that it would have an "adverse" impact to the surrounding properties. Next to the condominium development, there are plans for another residential project to be built.

The city's planning officials had recommended support for the project.

The Ancaster Community Council supported the condominium development with few complaints.

Vincent stated as well that Sonoma Homes followed the city's own urban design, which "adopts the overarching principle that new development shall serve to maintain and support existing character, or create and promote the evolution of the character in areas where transformations are appropriate and planned."

The hearing chair stated the 19-unit development conforms to the city's official plan policies.

Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson, along with the city's planning committee and council, voted against the rezoning application for the three-storey development.

City staff argued at the hearing the proposal is "not compatible" with existing and future uses in the surrounding area, and therefor "fails to conform with (the) official plan."

Ferguson, who originally supported Sonoma Homes' proposal to build a medical office on the property, said he rejected the project because of the 10 variances the developer requested from the city. A few of the variances requested included increased lot coverage, decreased setbacks, reduced landscaping requirements, fewer parking spaces and a 50 per cent density increase.

"I worked hard to get it done right," said Ferguson last year. "I thought we were all very pleased with the end result. They subsequently abandoned it and went to this residential application.

Sonoma Homes dropped its plans for a medical office because there were "no offers" for the plan.

The developer took issue with Ferguson's comments at the time and appealed to the city's integrity commissioner. In his decision, George Rust-D'Eye dismissed the complaint.

The property contains a hydro corridor along Dalley Drive that confines the proposal to a certain portion of the land. The land also has a woodlot and mature trees.

The developer has proposed to have 31 underground parking spots and seven above-ground spaces. City staff had recommended the development needed 45 spots.

David Premi, architect and principal of DPAI, described the development as a "gateway building" into downtown Ancaster.

"This will be a very high-quality building," he told members of the Ancaster Community Council in December 2016. "It is Ancaster style."

Area residents were opposed to the development, arguing it was too intense for the community, while traffic would increase on local roads.
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  #9  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2018, 3:25 AM
LRTfan LRTfan is offline
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another example of why we absolutely need the OMB. Hamilton will become a complete no-fly zone for business and development without the OMB. Our council only deals with buddies and back-room favours. Imagine how many completely fine projects like this will be denied in the future without the OMB.
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  #10  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2018, 4:24 PM
drpgq drpgq is offline
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"The developer has proposed to have 31 underground parking spots and seven above-ground spaces. City staff had recommended the development needed 45 spots."

City staff just love parking spots. Hamilton really needs to lower what's currently required.
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  #11  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2018, 4:56 PM
TheRitsman TheRitsman is offline
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"The developer has proposed to have 31 underground parking spots and seven above-ground spaces. City staff had recommended the development needed 45 spots."

City staff just love parking spots. Hamilton really needs to lower what's currently required.
Seriously... the city wants less cars, and the development wants less cars, I don't understand why they would suggest more parking spots.

If having less parking spots brings down the cost of the units as well then it is all the better. I don't understand Hamilton sometimes...
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  #12  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2018, 12:06 AM
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Dr Awesomesauce Dr Awesomesauce is offline
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Originally Posted by LRTfan View Post
another example of why we absolutely need the OMB. Hamilton will become a complete no-fly zone for business and development without the OMB. Our council only deals with buddies and back-room favours. Imagine how many completely fine projects like this will be denied in the future without the OMB.
So then get rid of Council.

No OMB and no City Council. Problem solved!
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