HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada > Ontario > Hamilton > Culture, Dining, Sports & Recreation


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2018, 3:55 PM
drpgq drpgq is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hamilton/Dresden
Posts: 1,679
Playhouse Theatre

Princess Theatre is opening a new theatre in the old City Kidz theatre on Sherman.

https://www.facebook.com/princesscin...55066490281556
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2018, 7:16 PM
thistleclub thistleclub is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 3,650
Between the Playhouse and Westdale indie/arthouse reboots, it will be interesting to see how the AGH frames its film programming, and how it impacts their attendance. By the time the gallery's marquee film festival lands in mid-October, for example, there will be two or more local screens dedicated to showing the same kind of films that the AGH typically does, only far more frequently. The AGH has tended to fill the void left by the closure of the Broadway (20 years ago this summer) but if the cinematic ecosystem improves, that may become vestigial/redundant.
__________________
"Where architectural imagination is absent, the case is hopeless." - Louis Sullivan
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2018, 7:03 AM
fuller fuller is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Hamilton
Posts: 142
What's exciting to me is that we might end up with three geographic options - west, central, and east.

Local vs. destination indie/arthouse means patrons can walk or bike to the show.

I've been wondering how the local residents around the Westdale will react when the theatre is suddenly popular again, with patrons coming from all around, if it were to be the sole option in the Hamilton area.

Hopefully two full time screens, and one festival, will be able to actually build the market for interesting films, in the same way several cafes seem to increase demand overall rather than cut into each other's business.

Along with the Zoetic on Concession St., the city will finally have a local option for most urban residents no matter where you live.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2018, 12:06 PM
thistleclub thistleclub is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 3,650
Westdale's 80+ businesses are largely closed by the time that the cinema starts up. I don't think cinemagoer traffic was ever much of an issue, except maybe the matinees. There's generally oodles of parking, and Westdale is wired into the HSR's trunk line (facing onto King, three blocks from Main).

The Playhouse has a larger capacity than the Westdale, but very different dynamics in most other regards. Despite City Kidz razing a neighbouring cottage for bus access, the theatre has linited dedicated parking and is connected to the Barton bus and some distance from either King or Main, neighbourhood synergies are [emergent at best]( and it's on a side-street.

I still can't shake the feeling that both are too big to fill regularly without pandering to the mainstream. The Zoetic (which replaced The Movie Palace) is half the size of either and defines itself as a multi-event rental space, not a cinema -- hosts one or two screenings a month. (Summer 2018 is mainly dedicated to the Harry Potter series.) It's possible that we might end up with variations on that model.
__________________
"Where architectural imagination is absent, the case is hopeless." - Louis Sullivan

Last edited by thistleclub; Feb 26, 2018 at 1:26 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2018, 2:19 PM
NortheastWind NortheastWind is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 540
The one-way street makes it awkward for patrons at this location. I hope it works for them. Maybe Sherman, as well as Birch can be the next 2-way conversion.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2018, 5:58 PM
drpgq drpgq is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hamilton/Dresden
Posts: 1,679
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2019, 5:11 PM
TheRitsman TheRitsman is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Hamilton
Posts: 726
Quote:
https://www.thespec.com/news-story/9...s-in-new-year/

The reopening of two old Hamilton movie houses after extensive restorations is ushering in a new era of local art-house cinema.

The Westdale is showing "Casablanca" for its grand reopening Feb. 14 during an evening that promises "glitz and glamour."

On the other side of town, the owners of the Playhouse on Sherman Avenue North are planning a February or March opening, but are coy about what will be on the marquee.

"I don't know when we're going to let that cat out of the bag," John Tutt said. "It's going to be reflective of the neighbourhood we're in."

Both operators promise regular showings of independent and international films, which locals have only been able to see consistently in other cities for years.

"It's kind of a wonderful coincidence in 2019," says Graham Crawford, a member of the nonprofit group behind the 1930s-era Westdale restoration.

Fred Fuchs, chair of the Westdale Cinema Group's board, said Hamilton is "severely underscreened" as a city.

Independent movie theatres are, in fact, "booming" across North America, with multiplexes leaving a void by showing blockbusters catered to young audiences, said Fuchs, a former Hollywood producer now living in Dundas.

Tutt is confident the two operators will find their respective niches.

"We can't wait to introduce the theatre to the public. It will be the oldest surviving cinema in Hamilton."

The 177 Sherman Ave. N. cinema opened its doors in 1914 with silent films and vaudeville. The last movies to show there were of the adult variety in the 1980s.

Tutt and his wife, Wendy, bought the old brick building just north of Barton Street East from charity City Kidz for $630,000 in February.

Since then, they've spent another $450,000 restoring it and setting it up with a new projector and other equipment.

Roughly 280 bucket seats are expected to arrive Feb. 20 from a Michigan manufacturer and will be installed shortly thereafter.

For Tutt, most striking about the restoration is the proscenium arch at the front and plasterwork, including the ribbed ceiling.

The old Playhouse sign (it wasn't the first one) couldn't be saved. However, another vintage one from Brantford's Sanderson Centre is being refashioned to resemble the original.

The Playhouse will have a coffee shop for cinema clientele that will also serve customers when movies aren't playing.

The Tutts are veteran operators of independent movie houses, having run Princess Cinemas in Waterloo since 1985. Their son, Jacob, is a key player in the Playhouse project.

Tutt said the most popular films at the family's two Waterloo theatres right now are "The Favourite," a historical comedy about Queen Anne, and "Green Book," about an African-American pianist who tours the South in the 1960s.

"There are so many movies that don't even see the light of day in Hamilton."

The Tutts and The Westdale operators alike are interested in hosting screenings of the Art Gallery of Hamilton's film program.

"From Day 1, we've been having conservations about it," Fuchs said.

An important component of The Westdale's lineup will be Canadian content, he said.

Annette Paiement, a well-known figure in the Hamilton arts scene, has been hired as The Westdale's executive director.

The 1935 theatre's focus will be cinema but it will also feature music, plays, comedy, civic talks and community events.

Westdale Cinema Group bought the deteriorating theatre for $1.7 million from its longtime Toronto owners in June 2017.

It's thanks to donors, lenders and grants that the volunteers have been able to pull off the $4.6-million project, Crawford says.

The nonprofit wasn't able to land any provincial or federal dollars. "So we had to scramble, but Hamiltonians stepped up and closed the gap."

The cinema's 340 seats are to arrive in early February with the names of donors on them.

There's a new stage, lighting, high-end projector and sound system, which will be miles ahead of the less-than-stellar visuals and audio of before.

"This is state of the art. This is brand-new technology," Fuchs said.

The interior will feature deep-textured "jazz plaster, which in some spots, like the lobby, had been covered up during a 1969 renovation.

Mirrors, woodwork, and red, creme and black Vitrolite glass tiles will do justice to the original Art Deco look, Crawford said.

"We are replicating it based on original architectural drawings and on archival photo. It's going to look like it did in 1935."

So, why "Casablanca" on Valentine's Day?

"It was selected because it's a great, romantic film," Crawford said.
I am quite excited about the Playhouse Theatre in particular. I think the benefits of the Westdale Theatre are pretty clear; it is a beautiful theatre in the middle of a well appreciated little downtowny area just outside the downtown that people will travel to, and it has a large enough local community to support the area as well. The theatre will also bring patrons out to local restaurants and shops around the area.

I personally think this is even more important for the Playhouse Theatre though. The area is rough, but with the newly built stadium, community centre, school, and awesome space that is the Cotton Factory, the entire area is ripe for developments along Barton, especially near the Freshco. There is a ton of vacant land, and with vintage vacant store fronts there is a lot of potential for the areas to fill up quickly, plus Ottawa St is extremely close by with its own renewal. If the city was smart they would be forward thinking with this area. Of course they likely will not be, and it is likely not zoned properly, but hey, what's new. I have a vision that is a little more grand than maybe what our local politicians may imagine. The Barton St area just North of the stadium would also be a great place for a parking garage that is sorely needed for the stadium, and with the nearby LRT station, this entire area could be a whole lot more attractive just minutes by fast transit to the downtown.
__________________
McMaster University Graduate Political Science, Minor in Geography.

My goal is to improve my community, the transit we use to get around it, and the health and happiness of everyone in it, and I realize these are all interconnected.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2019, 9:07 PM
ScreamingViking's Avatar
ScreamingViking ScreamingViking is offline
Ham-burgher
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Hamilton
Posts: 2,930
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRitsman View Post
I personally think this is even more important for the Playhouse Theatre though. The area is rough, but with the newly built stadium, community centre, school, and awesome space that is the Cotton Factory, the entire area is ripe for developments along Barton, especially near the Freshco. There is a ton of vacant land, and with vintage vacant store fronts there is a lot of potential for the areas to fill up quickly, plus Ottawa St is extremely close by with its own renewal. If the city was smart they would be forward thinking with this area. Of course they likely will not be, and it is likely not zoned properly, but hey, what's new. I have a vision that is a little more grand than maybe what our local politicians may imagine. The Barton St area just North of the stadium would also be a great place for a parking garage that is sorely needed for the stadium, and with the nearby LRT station, this entire area could be a whole lot more attractive just minutes by fast transit to the downtown.
I agree with just about everything you say here.

I think I'd rather the city NOT meddle, but not get in the way either... stick to the stuff they've been doing, like the rec centre and future sports field on Gage near the tracks, etc.

We've seen other streets redevelop organically through the actions of property and business owners (James N, Locke, Ottawa, Concession), and Barton is full of the same kind of potential; it's already happening along the western end. This central section may take a while but I think it will be very different in a decade.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2019, 2:32 PM
movingtohamilton movingtohamilton is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 990
Opening Night!

The Playhouse Cinema is set to open March 1st.

Jacob Tutt, the manager, was distributing flyers and posters on Augusta Street yesterday. We had a quick chat, and his excitement for the opening was was great to see.

Cinema Paradiso is the opening night film. There are so many first-run films during March!

Lots of info here: http://www.playhousecinema.ca
__________________
Keep your hands and feet inside the virtual machine at all times.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2019, 6:53 PM
realcity's Avatar
realcity realcity is offline
Bruatalism gets no respec
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Williamsville NY
Posts: 4,059
A battle of east vs west theatres.
__________________
Height restrictions and Set-backs are for Nimbys and the suburbs.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2019, 7:56 PM
TheRitsman TheRitsman is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Hamilton
Posts: 726
Quote:
Originally Posted by realcity View Post
A battle of east vs west theatres.
I'm excited for all this new theatre space! Tivoli and the Avon would be nice to get going too
__________________
McMaster University Graduate Political Science, Minor in Geography.

My goal is to improve my community, the transit we use to get around it, and the health and happiness of everyone in it, and I realize these are all interconnected.
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada > Ontario > Hamilton > Culture, Dining, Sports & Recreation
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 2:50 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.