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  #1  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2022, 3:47 PM
Dariusb Dariusb is offline
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Most and least dense European countries

https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/...n-density.html
Interesting article about the most and least dense European countries.
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  #2  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2022, 4:36 PM
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i consider Monaco more of a statelet than a country. Ditto for Vatican City (occupying an area smaller than Central Park in NYC), etc. The article uses the same picture for Norway and Finland.
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  #3  
Old Posted May 30, 2022, 9:30 PM
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What the northernmost countries are the least populated? Consider this Canadian shocked!
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  #4  
Old Posted Jun 4, 2022, 5:03 AM
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How come there's no Europeans in here? This is supposed to be the European sub forum and all the posts are from North America. Boo.
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  #5  
Old Posted Sep 26, 2023, 5:32 AM
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I am very surprised is not mentioned Barcelona (in the top 9). Actually, this is the top 3 according to Wikipedia:

- Levallois-Perret 27,420/km2 France
- Emperador 23,067/km2 Spain
- L'Hospitalet de Llobregat 21,364/km2 Spain

And the one on the third position, I have been there many times, and comparing with Germany where I am coming from, the difference is quite visible
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Old Posted Sep 29, 2023, 6:17 PM
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Emperador is really freaky. It's a tiny village with 600 people and only one third of a square km, but it's all dense mid-rise apartments and surrounded by farm fields.

Check it out:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.5542...8192?entry=ttu
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  #7  
Old Posted Sep 29, 2023, 6:38 PM
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France is interesting bc it's north of the Alps, but the built form is often closer to the denser, more apartment-oriented Club Med countries.

You always notice the differences traveling between Germany and France. Germany is much closer to the UK-Netherlands-Nordics typology. Of course directly on the border is blurry, bc the border changed so many times in history.
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  #8  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2023, 7:56 AM
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I would distinguish some of those. The UK and parts of Benelux are something different, with a focus on rowhouses on narrow lots versus the courtyard apartment buildings favoured in Germany, the Nordics and the Austro-Hungarian cities. France, like you said, points more towards Italy than the other Northern countries.

Copenhagen and Stockholm are interesting in the sense that they were both very small and restricted by walls/water for most of their history. In the second half of the 19th century, though, they both saw a huge wave of speculative building in the Viennese courtyard-block style that occurred all at once as restrictions on land outside the old cores were lifted.

It really only lasted about twice as long as the current Toronto condo boom, despite these areas now being seen as bastions of "traditional", "historical" buildings.

In both cities, but moreso in Stockholm due to the geography, this "European" style ends very abruptly, transitioning into single-family homes on fairly large, irregular lots. Swedish people have come to call the inner-city, Viennese-style quarters "stenstad" or "stone town". I think this usage representing something distinct or noteworthy reflects the very sudden historical shift that created these places.

Both of the big Nordic cities actually have pretty extensive 19th-century cores for their size. They are some of the larger cities of this type not to have been touched by WW2 bombings. They are not dense from a statistical perspective, though, because household sizes are so small. I think Sweden is the country with the highest percentage of one-person households in the world.
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  #9  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2023, 8:06 AM
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The small city of Sundsvall (68,000) in Sweden is seen as notable for having a "stenstad", as most cities of its size and in that region don't have this. It came about because of a fire in 1888 that destroyed most of the centre, which would have been made of mostly wooden buildings on irregular streets.

After the fire, they built a "stenstad" for the new centre, which really reflects the ethos of the time. Had the fire happened 20 years eariler or later, you wouldn't have any of this.

It's a really nice town, actually, nestled in some scenic hills. Very unique to have this kind of centre in such a place.



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  #10  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2023, 5:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oskar88 View Post
I am very surprised is not mentioned Barcelona (in the top 9). Actually, this is the top 3 according to Wikipedia:

- Levallois-Perret 27,420/km2 France
- Emperador 23,067/km2 Spain
- L'Hospitalet de Llobregat 21,364/km2 Spain

And the one on the third position, I have been there many times, and comparing with Germany where I am coming from, the difference is quite visible
These figures are deceiving, because they compare entire municipal territories, and European municipalities have widely different sizes.

We made that comparison on the rival forum a few years ago, and the most densely populated districts in Europe were in Paris, in Madrid, and in Barcelona. They beat any of these suburban municipalities listed here.
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  #11  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2023, 5:40 PM
New Brisavoine New Brisavoine is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
France is interesting bc it's north of the Alps, but the built form is often closer to the denser, more apartment-oriented Club Med countries.

You always notice the differences traveling between Germany and France. Germany is much closer to the UK-Netherlands-Nordics typology. Of course directly on the border is blurry, bc the border changed so many times in history.
I find German urbanism much closer to France's urbanism than to UK-Benelux. German cities have a dense core surrounded by low density sprawl. It's the same in France.

France is very different from the Med in the sense that its dense cores are surrounded by low density sprawl, which is the case neither in Italy nor in Spain. In France the detached house is very prevalent, as in Germany. It's nowhere to be seen in Spain, and rather not frequent in Italy.

France and Germany are also very different from Benelux and UK in the sense that their urban cores are denser, made up of taller apartment buildings. In Germany this has become a bit blurred of course since WW2, because all their city centers were destroyed, and never rebuilt to the same level of density they had before the war, but still, they are denser than their Beneluxian and British counterparts, and closer to the French model.

French and German cities also sprawl much more than Dutch and British cities (Belgium is closer to France and Germany here, with unruly sprawl).
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  #12  
Old Posted May 8, 2024, 7:42 PM
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There's this theory that was suggested by a French geographer in 1989.

The Blue Banana

Lol, I find the name of it to be cool.

It just states that the most dense areas of the continent have been the most creative and wealthiest for 1000 years or so, which makes sense simply because human resources and exchanges over these areas are more intense than in countrysides with a low population density, where life tends to be rougher.
Hence the difference between West and East Germany that would go back further into the past than the Soviet occupation, for instance.

I suppose it's an interesting theory, though it wouldn't be enough to explain the extraordinary wealth and standard of living of Switzerland.

Besides, some areas like Scandinavia are not included in the banana, while they manage to maintain a fairly high standard of living too, so density wouldn't explain everything.
It's nonetheless definitely an important factor.
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  #13  
Old Posted May 31, 2024, 12:46 PM
KlausD2 KlausD2 is offline
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Last edited by KlausD2; Jun 6, 2024 at 9:11 AM.
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Old Posted Jun 6, 2024, 9:11 AM
KlausD2 KlausD2 is offline
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Last edited by KlausD2; Jun 12, 2024 at 2:41 PM.
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