HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Mountain West


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #17141  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2024, 6:07 AM
i2theSKY's Avatar
i2theSKY i2theSKY is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2021
Location: Utah
Posts: 132


Sorry for the image size, didn't know how to make it smaller. This recent photo from Scott Taylor is a good example of how much Astra adds to the skyline from certain viewpoints. Yes Astra isn't perfect. The lower west and main north tower sections would've looked much better with the full window treatment. That said I still think it's a great addition to the skyline. I think it's going to be a very attractive tower from this angle once the glass and crown are complete. Worthington is also a great addition that makes a big impact from this viewpoint.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17142  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2024, 1:30 PM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Downtown Los Angeles
Posts: 19,249
i2theSKY, thanks for posting this. Here it is in a smaller format. I agree, Worthington also makes for a great contribution to the skyline.




This below is mind-numbingly grotesque. Dystopian on steroids!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah_Amazing View Post
Meanwhile in China:

Video Link












Last edited by delts145; Feb 12, 2024 at 1:51 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17143  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2024, 2:58 PM
Enemy4thePeople Enemy4thePeople is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rileybo View Post
That blank white wall, I will agree, is a mistake.
Well, I don't know what I'm talking about but I think the north side is less than 10' from the property line, which means they can't have more than 25% of that face with windows, and if those windows on each side of the tower portion are 8' wide all the way up the building, that would account for almost exactly 25% of that wall. Then subtract the penthouse, and factor in the garage wall square footage and you're more than safely buffered from that maximum. And you get a good amount of shear wall. Also, when building so close to the property line, even next to a one story pawn shop or whatever, you have to consider that another building can be built just as close to your building at some point in the future, so you're not putting windows with a just view of another blank wall within spitting distance.

Could they have designed it differently and stepped it back to get more windows, then use a structural system that wouldn't need so much shear wall, and sacrifice income generating square footages? Yeah, sure. If things were different, things would be different. But that's not what happened, and it's good that we've got a sufficient residential tower built right downtown on a prominent corner.

I don't know. I don't think we're getting a tower by Zaha Hadid or BIG or MVRDV or OMA anytime soon, so I'm fine with it.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17144  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2024, 3:53 PM
freeshavocado freeshavocado is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Salt Lake City
Posts: 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by zurich View Post
Agreed, it looks boring and not something you'd see in 2024! I bet China hasn't built anything remotely close to this mess since 1990. But its SLC ... and NO one wants to build a signature tower downtown and there's certainly no competition for bragging rights. There's no major catalyst to change downtown into anything special, no big headquarters coming in and all they seem to construct are 4-5 story apartments on almost every other block-therefore there's no vested interest in what develops around them. The green loop now seems to be decades in the making, the Jazz will probably pack up soon. I'm not trying to be negative, but what's the reason to really frequent downtown? It's not really walkable... zero parks, nothing really to look at aside from they Capital and Temple Square, no waterway, no special view. Look at Vegas..San Fran.. (aside from the homeless) amazing views everywhere you turn. Downtown Dallas sucks for the most part, but they do have world class museums. Build a massive park, build luxury condo's, lure 2-3 massive tech companies downtown and this might change, but until then, it will be more of the same I am afraid - I really wish it wasn't the case.
I know this is a skyscraper forum, but all the apartment buildings (even the bland 4-5 story ones) are bringing more 24/7 people downtown than a huge office building would. Lunch-time crowds and a stream of cars leaving the city at 5 does less for vibrancy than residents in a real downtown neighborhood walking to the grocery shopping, the movie theater, the neighborhood bar, the farmers market etc. There's way more foot traffic downtown than when I moved here in the mid-2010s.

And idk what amazing views you're referring to in Vegas, but they're not anything I'd want in SLC. While it's not the most exciting downtown in the country, it actually has impressive access to nature. You can walk into City Creek canyon and the extensive bonneville shoreline trail system from downtown. Love it or hate it, Temple Square has impressive gardens and buildings that are a real draw. As are the fine arts venues downtown (Eccles, Capitol, Abravanel, Ririe-Woodbury). Main St is becoming more and more of a going-out spot. The library and city hall are impressive with the park space frequently used for festivals. City Creek mall is very nice and actually has stores and shoppers (have you been to denver or san francisco's downtown malls recently? Bleak.) The green loop and a car-less main st could be big draws if they pan out. I just think downtown will get better and better, and while I'd love a beautiful tall tower, it's not necessary for improvement of the city.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17145  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2024, 5:05 PM
DCRes's Avatar
DCRes DCRes is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 730
That view with the library in the forefront is really cool
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17146  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2024, 6:41 PM
tchild2 tchild2 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145 View Post
^
Your insistence that the tower is ugly is not a unanimous opinion, far from it. Like all of us, it's your subjective opinion, and no one is taking it as anything more seriously than that.

It's the 'Doom Spiral' as Taboubak put it that causes people to shake their heads in disbelief. Sometimes, this thread diverts into the nonsense of newspaper comment sections gone amuck.
Agreed. Every addition the city adds a certain flair and vibrancy. SLC isn't any other city. It isn't supposed to be. SLC has its own vibe and energy. You can either appreciate it or not.

Personally, I think the Astra is swell. Ditto the new Worthington. SLC is finally feeling like a real city IMO.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17147  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2024, 7:19 PM
Atlas's Avatar
Atlas Atlas is offline
Space Magi
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Salt Lake City
Posts: 1,792
Seen on LinkedIn and relevant to the current conversation.



For the record, I like the Astra Tower and appreciate what the development brings to our skyline and city. It's not the most remarkable tower in the world, obviously, but it's a fine building and a big step up for SLC!
__________________
r/DevelopmentSLC
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17148  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2024, 10:36 PM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Downtown Los Angeles
Posts: 19,249
i2theSKY, I just noticed that you had used imgur on your large Scott Taylor photo. The only thing left for you to do to adjust the size was a little trick Atlas shared with us a while back. Just place a lower cap h right before the final period and jpeg. Like so, h.jpeg

That magically adjusts it down to a comfortable size. Thanks again Atlas!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17149  
Old Posted Feb 13, 2024, 1:09 AM
Nebula3lem123's Avatar
Nebula3lem123 Nebula3lem123 is offline
high-floor train enjoyer
 
Join Date: Nov 2023
Location: South Jordan, Utah
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145 View Post
i2theSKY, I just noticed that you had used imgur on your large Scott Taylor photo. The only thing left for you to do to adjust the size was a little trick Atlas shared with us a while back. Just place a lower cap h right before the final period and jpeg. Like so, h.jpeg

That magically adjusts it down to a comfortable size. Thanks again Atlas!
To add, here's a guide that Paniolo Man shared with me when I had a similar problem over on the Ogden page
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17150  
Old Posted Feb 13, 2024, 1:43 AM
i2theSKY's Avatar
i2theSKY i2theSKY is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2021
Location: Utah
Posts: 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atlas View Post
Seen on LinkedIn and relevant to the current conversation.



For the record, I like the Astra Tower and appreciate what the development brings to our skyline and city. It's not the most remarkable tower in the world, obviously, but it's a fine building and a big step up for SLC!
Nice find! It will be interesting to see what kind of mural they decide on. If done right it will make up for losing the Owl. Hopefully we end up losing the new mural as well since that would mean the tower on Regent Street got built!

Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145 View Post
i2theSKY, I just noticed that you had used imgur on your large Scott Taylor photo. The only thing left for you to do to adjust the size was a little trick Atlas shared with us a while back. Just place a lower cap h right before the final period and jpeg. Like so, h.jpeg

That magically adjusts it down to a comfortable size. Thanks again Atlas!
Thanks for the information... it's always easy when you know the tricks lol.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nebula3lem123 View Post
To add, here's a guide that Paniolo Man shared with me when I had a similar problem over on the Ogden page
Thanks, you guys are putting the pressure on me to get it right next time.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17151  
Old Posted Feb 13, 2024, 7:24 PM
Orlando's Avatar
Orlando Orlando is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 3,967
I actually really enjoyed the larger pic. Nice shot!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17152  
Old Posted Feb 13, 2024, 7:25 PM
Orlando's Avatar
Orlando Orlando is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 3,967
Seattle Times boasts SLC as best ski town.

Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17153  
Old Posted Feb 13, 2024, 7:47 PM
Always Sunny in SLC Always Sunny in SLC is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 509
Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145 View Post
Excellent points Always Sunny. Your points and all points regarding precious limited resources of water. A couple of agri-related concerns are worth taking a deep dive into Utah's agricultural future. Just to touch lightly on a multi-faceted and complicated path, there are a few concerns that I have when dealing with Alfalfa hay farming that bear further indepth study and wading through the weeds, and not taking a meat cleaver to the subject(no pun intended).

I remember how many of us have lamented on several occasions over the years in this forum regarding the continued demise of Utah's once excellent Dairy Farming community. This of course as much of what used to be open land along the Wasatch Front has been swallowed up by Utah's hyper-growth population advent of the past twenty-five years. Now even parts of the greater metro such as Heber Valley are losing their cherished tradition of Dairies. The reason that this is concerning is the fact that the survival of Dairies in Utah is integrally and laterally connected to Utah's Alfalfa farming. Alfalfa is the essential feed ingredient for Dairy and Beef cattle. Currently, Utah exports 29% of its Alfalfa and retains in-state 71% of this feed product. Of course, we need to take a serious look if Utah should be raising alfalfa for anyone other than its own population. Also, another interesting factor is that there is a reason why the more arid Western/Southwestern States of the U.S. raise such an inordinate percentage amount of alfalfa feed. The Western U.S. States such as Arizona, Utah, etc. are not only considered some of the highest quality alfalfa production in the world but the ability to raise alfalfa is ideally farmed on the more arid climate cycle of the Western U.S.

My question where I would want far more information provided is this. Should Utah sacrifice its internal high-quality protein Dairy and Beef Industry product that could be essential to its future ability to provide a sustainable protein product for its own Utah citizens? Perhaps, it is even more egregious that California has been allowed to completely vacate its responsibility to provide critical in-state water capture and retention infrastructure over the past decades. Yet at the same time California has been allowed to grab from its neighboring Western States far more of its allotted share of the Colorado River than legally allowed. This is while the Intermountain and Southwest States have looked away to their peril, especially now that the West's population growth and available water resources have reached a critically unsustainable point. Hopefully, recent pressure will allow Utah the enforced legal right to refuse this practice to continue

Another question worth exploring is whether Utah should sacrifice its in-state Dairy Industry for say California and Arizona to cultivate such a high amount of product such as Almond Orchards, which also demand such a ludicrous amount of Colorado water. I love almonds but maybe Arizona and California need to better prioritize their in-state water storage infrastructure (especially California). The amount of high-quality agricultural and drinking water that California wastes and or allows to just empty into the Pacific Ocean is criminal. This has been a facet of the green religious cult gone amuck over the past several decades and Utah should not have to pay the price for California vacating its responsibilities when it comes to water retention and storage. Sure, all Western States need to do a better job of prioritizing their water capturing and retention infrastructure, but California has been particularly the most negligent these past few decades. Again, it's particularly galling considering how much of the Colorado they use instead of implementing needed water retention.

Excuse my lengthy diatribe. So yes, Utah should better manage its water retention and distribution, as well as improve the management of its beef and dairy industry. Should Utah be exporting 29% of its alfalfa product to customers such as the CCP slave state? Consider that alfalfa hay farming is essential to the beef and dairy industry. These multi-generational farms are much more than just a fond tradition, but also a critical component to the quality of Utah's future table product. (Note: Utah's Lamb and wool production is also worth consideration). There is nothing more critical than the survival of Utah's internal supply of food and water products for its own citizens.
I admittedly would be totally fine with agriculture and ranching to disappear from Utah (not popular opinion, I know). Regardless, with lab grown meat and milk seemingly on the horizon, I am not sure Utah is in charge of its future as many might think.

Another unpopular opinion, but on the other side of the political spectrum, I am very supportive of piping water into Utah. The idea of water scarcity is a political, not a technical problem. Whether that would be bringing it from the Snake, Great Lakes, Mississippi, Missouri, ocean or some combination, is just a matter of people agreeing. If that became a reality, then farm and ranch to people's heart's content.

If Utah wanted to do something that would change the state forever, then piping in ocean water to the GSL to create a lower salinity and more recreationally appealing body of water would be amazing. You could control the water level as to avoid vast areas of rotting life. Antelope, Fremont and Stansbury Islands would be valuable land for recreating and/or living. The northern half could be used for mineral extraction (maintaining the dike) to make it more politically feasible (for Conservatives). The wetlands along Davis and Weber Counties could be actively managed to make them more ecologically sustainable.

It would allow Utah Lake to retain more of its water to deepen the lake and reduce turbidity and algal blooms. Utah Lake could possibly provide freshwater to Utah County residents if enough could be retained by dredging.

Lastly, an outlet would need to be dug to allow outflow where it would spread over the hundreds of square miles of the Salt Flats to evaporate, which also maintains the salt crust of the Flats.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17154  
Old Posted Feb 13, 2024, 7:54 PM
Always Sunny in SLC Always Sunny in SLC is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 509
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post
Keep coming Seattle (ites?) and spend those Microsoft, Amazon and Boeing dollars!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17155  
Old Posted Feb 13, 2024, 8:13 PM
dakben dakben is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Salt Lake City (Downtown)
Posts: 52
Astra topped out:
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17156  
Old Posted Feb 13, 2024, 11:12 PM
Comrade's Avatar
Comrade Comrade is offline
They all float down here
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Hair City, Utah
Posts: 9,430
Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145 View Post
^
Your insistence that the tower is ugly is not a unanimous opinion, far from it. Like all of us, it's your subjective opinion, and no one is taking it as anything more seriously than that.

It's the 'Doom Spiral' as Taboubak put it that causes people to shake their heads in disbelief. Sometimes, this thread diverts into the nonsense of newspaper comment sections gone amuck.
C'mon. Doom spiral? You're so dramatic. My guy, this thread literally dies for days on end. You should be thanking me that I bring life to a thread where the last development-related post (not counting the update about Astra topping out) was on the Platform 1500 Apartments a week ago.

But I guess we can talk about water conservation again. That's a banger.



So, you're welcome.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17157  
Old Posted Feb 13, 2024, 11:45 PM
Boz's Avatar
Boz Boz is offline
of SLC
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Luke 17:26
Posts: 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Comrade View Post
C'mon. Doom spiral? You're so dramatic. My guy, this thread literally dies for days on end. You should be thanking me that I bring life to a thread where the last development-related post (not counting the update about Astra topping out) was on the Platform 1500 Apartments a week ago.

But I guess we can talk about water conservation again. That's a banger.



So, you're welcome.

Send in the clowns.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17158  
Old Posted Feb 14, 2024, 3:46 AM
Nebula3lem123's Avatar
Nebula3lem123 Nebula3lem123 is offline
high-floor train enjoyer
 
Join Date: Nov 2023
Location: South Jordan, Utah
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Always Sunny in SLC View Post
Another unpopular opinion, but on the other side of the political spectrum, I am very supportive of piping water into Utah. The idea of water scarcity is a political, not a technical problem. Whether that would be bringing it from the Snake, Great Lakes, Mississippi, Missouri, ocean or some combination, is just a matter of people agreeing. If that became a reality, then farm and ranch to people's heart's content.
I would tend to agree on this. But one problem I've heard is that a pipeline would need to be THICK to carry enough water to even maintain water levels. Water conservation, especially through regulating agriculture and water rights, will have a more immediate effect, and doing the little things will add up. A pipeline would be an amazing long term solution, especially if we can manage a very high capacity pipeline, but that would take a long time, likely longer than we have to save the lake otherwise.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17159  
Old Posted Feb 14, 2024, 4:40 AM
rockies's Avatar
rockies rockies is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Location: Utah
Posts: 264
I think a pipeline would be cool as infrastructure and im inclined to support it lol but why build a huge expensive pipeline to dump it into the middle of the desert to maintain 0.2% of gdp/economic activity... which is what we are currently doing and what necessitates the pipeline in the first place
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17160  
Old Posted Feb 14, 2024, 4:55 AM
Ironweed Ironweed is offline
Ironweed
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Utah
Posts: 519
Comrade is slightly peeved that he was not able to monetize his new ice skating venture at Sears Lake. The weather just did not cooperate this year, as it has been too warm. In a change of plans, he and his posse have recently commandeered the new Silo Lake and is holding both at ransom. His plan is to sell the water to the state for a significant sum. "No development will be allowed at those properties until every drop has been sold." He said in a recent interview.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Mountain West
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 4:36 PM.

     
SkyscraperPage.com - Archive - Privacy Statement - Top

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.