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  #21  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2023, 3:05 PM
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Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
Great pics. Lake Conestee is very interesting; I like that you gave the background about it. I'm sure it looks a lot different in the summertime.

And hehe, whether you wanted to do a parody of or an homage to my LA thread, either way, I feel flattered!

Looking forward to more pics!
When it comes to your thread, it's just plain interesting to see someone going about their day in an alpha world city that has built up such a glamorous cachet since the 1910's. Los Angeles is Los Angeles, no matter how often it pretends to be someplace else on TV or in the movies. It can't help but be itself, and it's in love with itself, and rightly so. No other city can be Los Angeles. Your thread is also inspiring, again because it's just plain interesting to see someone going about their day in a city like Los Angeles. I like seeing all these updates, and what's on the menu at all these interesting little places you visit. It makes me want to get out there and document my daily goings-on as well.

Meanwhile, here I am in a small city, deceptively so because this state makes it next to impossible to annex. But even so, here I am in a booming New South city that has marketed itself with smashing success as a hub for international business. Companies from all over the world, but most notably Germany, France, Korea, and Japan, have operations here, which have attracted other companies from other places to serve them. There are companies here that make electronics, and cars, and tires, and even high-speed train cars, among many other things. General Electric has a major operation here, as does Lockheed Martin, which operates out of an old Air Force base from World War II. There is so much industrial activity that there's an inland port facility where all of these goods are collected and loaded into shipping containers before taking a ride on a dedicated rail line to the actual port down in Charleston.

This is an enormous difference from Asheville, which has forever viewed itself as a gorgeous tourist town that's far too pretty to work. Asheville is content to support itself with money from suitors, whereas Greenville makes its own money. And because Greenville makes its own money, and requires all these people and operations from around the world to keep the money coming, Greenville is leagues ahead of Asheville when it comes to diversity. I know it's nothing to someone who lives anywhere diverse, but I was beside myself when, a while back, I saw a stand set up in a Walmart parking lot to sell Diwali fireworks. I love hearing different languages when I go out in public, and I love all the ethnic markets and the Chinese and the Mexican supermarkets. I love unexpected combinations... such as at the "strip malls from heaven" that I like to visit, one of which contains a coffee shop, Thai restaurant, pho shop, and Vietnamese market among its offerings, and the other of which has an Italian restaurant, deli, Thai restaurant, sushi restaurant, Korean market, Japanese market, and an Indian bakery that makes magnificent chocolate and peanut butter croissants. The diversity is probably what I love most about Greenville -- because it sure as shit isn't the summer climate. That's awful.

Add it up though, and that's what's worth documenting about Greenville as I come and go, even with the occasional stop at Subway.

Now, speaking of what Lake Conestee looks like in the summer... Well, I can't say. I try to avoid movement as much as possible in the summer because summer here is godawful. However, I can tell you that I've visited it in the spring, and it looks different even then. Take a look at these photos from late March of last year:





















You'll note there are a couple of photos of the actual Conestee Mill, which ceased operations in the 1970s, plus the dam that everyone's fretting about. The cost of doing something about the dam and pollution in the lake is what's kept anyone from redeveloping the mill. Almost every other mill in town that's still standing has been redeveloped as apartments or shopping, while three others that only have their smokestacks or ruins still standing are in the pipeline for redevelopment. But nobody's taking a chance with Conestee Mill quit yet.
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  #22  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2023, 3:17 PM
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I can't think of any public parks I have seen with swing benches before, unless I did not notice them.
Swing benches harken back to porch swings, a very "Southern" sort of thing. It's good marketing. There are several of these in the park around the waterfall downtown as well.

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Originally Posted by EastSideHBG View Post
Loving the pics and the commentary! Does the toxic swamp smell badly, particularly in the summer?
Beats me. I try not to go outside in the summer any more than I have to, and haven't been to Lake Conestee when it's hot. My guess? It probably just smells like mud. Most of the actual gunk is buried under a few decades of sediment.
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  #23  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2023, 11:40 PM
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When it comes to your thread, it's just plain interesting to see someone going about their day in an alpha world city that has built up such a glamorous cachet since the 1910's. Los Angeles is Los Angeles, no matter how often it pretends to be someplace else on TV or in the movies. It can't help but be itself, and it's in love with itself, and rightly so. No other city can be Los Angeles. Your thread is also inspiring, again because it's just plain interesting to see someone going about their day in a city like Los Angeles. I like seeing all these updates, and what's on the menu at all these interesting little places you visit. It makes me want to get out there and document my daily goings-on as well.

Meanwhile, here I am in a small city, deceptively so because this state makes it next to impossible to annex. But even so, here I am in a booming New South city that has marketed itself with smashing success as a hub for international business. Companies from all over the world, but most notably Germany, France, Korea, and Japan, have operations here, which have attracted other companies from other places to serve them. There are companies here that make electronics, and cars, and tires, and even high-speed train cars, among many other things. General Electric has a major operation here, as does Lockheed Martin, which operates out of an old Air Force base from World War II. There is so much industrial activity that there's an inland port facility where all of these goods are collected and loaded into shipping containers before taking a ride on a dedicated rail line to the actual port down in Charleston.

This is an enormous difference from Asheville, which has forever viewed itself as a gorgeous tourist town that's far too pretty to work. Asheville is content to support itself with money from suitors, whereas Greenville makes its own money. And because Greenville makes its own money, and requires all these people and operations from around the world to keep the money coming, Greenville is leagues ahead of Asheville when it comes to diversity. I know it's nothing to someone who lives anywhere diverse, but I was beside myself when, a while back, I saw a stand set up in a Walmart parking lot to sell Diwali fireworks. I love hearing different languages when I go out in public, and I love all the ethnic markets and the Chinese and the Mexican supermarkets. I love unexpected combinations... such as at the "strip malls from heaven" that I like to visit, one of which contains a coffee shop, Thai restaurant, pho shop, and Vietnamese market among its offerings, and the other of which has an Italian restaurant, deli, Thai restaurant, sushi restaurant, Korean market, Japanese market, and an Indian bakery that makes magnificent chocolate and peanut butter croissants. The diversity is probably what I love most about Greenville -- because it sure as shit isn't the summer climate. That's awful.

Add it up though, and that's what's worth documenting about Greenville as I come and go, even with the occasional stop at Subway.
Greenville sounds like an interesting place, and seems it will only get more interesting as time goes by. I'm glad you're documenting what's taking place, and it'll be even fun to see how things evolve there. I hope you have a lot of fun taking pictures of your city. I'll admit I knew nothing about Greenville, SC before. Your pictures and your talking about the place made me explore it a bit on Google Maps, and I see a lot of potential there for some very interesting and fun shots. It's also more cosmopolitan than I thought it'd be---judging by some of the restaurants I saw on Google Maps, and of course I am a total restaurant addict.

Lake Conestee does look a lot different in spring, apparently. I'm curious to know what will eventually become of the old mill. And that dam, or type of dam I guess, reminds me of places I've seen in movies...
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  #24  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2023, 12:06 AM
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This Disco Concert is so Downtown SP! The plants, the tiles, everything.

My Los Angeles is amazing and it was my inspiration for my São Paulo's one.

Greenville seems to have a nice urban quality. I liked it! Keep updating us. Thank you for sharing!
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Old Posted Jan 28, 2023, 4:07 PM
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Awesome thread!!
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  #26  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2023, 3:13 PM
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Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
Greenville sounds like an interesting place, and seems it will only get more interesting as time goes by. I'm glad you're documenting what's taking place, and it'll be even fun to see how things evolve there. I hope you have a lot of fun taking pictures of your city. I'll admit I knew nothing about Greenville, SC before. Your pictures and your talking about the place made me explore it a bit on Google Maps, and I see a lot of potential there for some very interesting and fun shots. It's also more cosmopolitan than I thought it'd be---judging by some of the restaurants I saw on Google Maps, and of course I am a total restaurant addict.

Lake Conestee does look a lot different in spring, apparently. I'm curious to know what will eventually become of the old mill. And that dam, or type of dam I guess, reminds me of places I've seen in movies...
Out of curiosity, what restaurants caught your attention?

I'm hoping to head out and take some more photos this weekend. It ought to be nice and cold.
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  #27  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2023, 10:07 PM
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Out of curiosity, what restaurants caught your attention?

I'm hoping to head out and take some more photos this weekend. It ought to be nice and cold.
I saw an Afghani place, a Jamaican place, and several Indian places. The one Indian place that stood out for me has dosa and idlis, which I love. It looks like it's in an Indian market. It's been my experience that those kinds of places are really good places for dosa; they're made to order for you. There's one Indian market near us that has the buffet/cafeteria-style food already laying out, which we don't eat, but they also make the dosas to order, and they're pretty good (we avoid cafeteria-style and buffet food, it's usually not that great). If you decide to go to it, maybe you can order a dosa, and let me know if you like it. It's called Swad.

And I'm such a sucker for Jamaican goat curry. Mmm, mmm!
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  #28  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2023, 5:39 AM
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awesome. i'm still miffed the two trips i had planned there last year got cancelled.

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  #29  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2023, 3:10 PM
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Saturday, February 18, 2023

Greenville, SC: I Felt So Symphonic Yesterday


For a late Valentine's Day present, I took my husband to see a performance of Les Preludes by Liszt and The Planets by Holst, as performed by the Greenville Symphony Orchestra at the Peace Center for the Performing Arts. Please enjoy this selection of crummy phone photos. We strolled, ate dinner, strolled, ate dessert, strolled, listened to the symphony, and strolled some more.

You will note that at one point there is a photograph of a slice of red velvet cake. It reminded of my husband's attempt to perfect his red velvet cake recipe some time back. The attempt involved making several cakes and tweaking this or that, and several icings, tweaking this and that, until we were absolutely awash in red velvet cake and cream cheese frosting. By my estimate, at one point we controlled approximately 95% of the world's supply of red velvet cake, and I distinctly remember feeling quite drunk with power at the thought of it.

Video Link
















































































































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"To sustain the life of a large, modern city in this cloying, clinging heat is an amazing achievement. It is no wonder that the white men and women in Greenville walk with a slow, dragging pride, as if they had taken up a challenge and intended to defy it without end." -- Rebecca West for The New Yorker, 1947

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  #30  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2023, 4:29 PM
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Cool shots!

I particularly like these:

Quote:


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  #31  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2023, 7:33 PM
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Saturday, March 18, 2023

Greenville, SC: Industrial Resolution


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Saturday was a tale of thwarted ambition. Our plan was to head over to West Greenville Village, or possibly downtown, get something nice to eat at a place we'd never tried before, then hop on the Swamp Rabbit Trail and walk all the way from the new Unity Park west of downtown, through downtown along the river to Cleveland Park east of downtown, taking photos of all the public art and flowers as we went.

However, the first thing that went wrong was that we chose a place we'd heard a lot of good things about, but which was only serving a foo-foo little brunch for foo-foo little people who don't need to eat. Their business model is, apparently, charge high prices for tiny plates of food, make up for it with alcohol, and assume that everyone will pay for the atmosphere. It was, basically, a big city dining experience.

(Pro tip: This is how big city rich people stay so slim: They have the servants eat and get fat for them. Most rich people in large cities actually sustain themselves via photosynthesis.)

I really, really wanted to like this place. The atmosphere was awesome. However, when you serve me a burger, the only thing on the shrunken menu that wasn't some uppity, "elevated," take on the kind of garbage, like biscuits and gravy, that Southern farmers eat before a day in the pastures -- and that burger tastes like it came from Wendy's while simultaneously being smaller and costing twice as much -- I'm not going to like you no matter how atmospheric you are.

But the place looked cool:



[



Thus fortified, we set out into West Greenville Village.



Once upon a time, West Greenville, now known as West Greenville Village or the Village of West Greenville, existed to serve the needs of workers at the crescent of textile mills and industrial operations that bracketed the western edge of Greenville. Greenville was a thoroughly industrial city and made its fortune in cotton and every textile you can make from it. There were enormous mills and warehouses, and many of them are still standing today. One or two even still host industrial operations while the rest have been converted into upscale housing and shopping. At its peak, Greenville boasted eighteen textile mills.

But back in the day, you'd spend your time off from your mill job, walking from your mill-owned housing over here to the commercial hub along Pendleton Street. Now it's all artists and hipster burgers.



















This a fringe flower bush. I want some for my yard:







For several decades, as America decided the more economical thing to do would be to allow Vietnam and Bangladesh make all its textiles, West Greenville fell into a deep decline and became something of a no-go zone. There are still some scraps of grit in the revitalized areas, and some very gritty areas beyond those. We considered a house not terribly far away from this part of town when we were househunting, but got warned away from it by our realtor, and the county crime mapper also gave us pause. I'm glad other people are moving in though, and bringing things around. The entire west side is the new frontier for revitalization, renovation, and gentrification.

Note the Venezuelan food truck over to the right.







This is Greenville vernacular: the mill house. The big mills built these things by the hundreds for their workers. You'd work for the mill and rent your house from the mill, and live and die -- quite literally -- by the mill. Common problems faced by mill workers were "brown lung" a disease caused by inhaling cotton dust, and getting maimed by the machinery. Child labor was also an issue, as children were often the only ones small and nimble enough to get under the machinery as the looms passed back and forth overhead.

It bears considering that there were no safety precautions, no safety equipment, and no climate control either. Southern textile mills were hell on earth.







This is the Brandon Mill, established in 1901. By 1906 it employed 420 people and its mill village boasted 420 houses. By 1929 it employed more than 1200 people. During World War II it supplied the US government with medical gauze, tent canvas, and uniform cloth. It shut down in 1977.







The way a mill village works is that you have this enormous brick beast squatting in the middle of it, surrounded by streets upon streets of houses that look like this. The bigger the house, likely the higher up the chain at the mill the employee was, until you got to the owners, who lived in mansions over on the other side of downtown from here.













Brandon Mill is one of the mills that now hosts upscale housing... and probably the ghosts of a few dozen workers chewed up in the machinery. At least, that's kind of what I would expect. But I honestly couldn't look at this pool and not wonder what all those workers would have thought of it. I imagine them working away in the heat of a South Carolina summer, probably dreaming of being able to jump in some cool water, and now here we are.











This is wisteria, a beautiful pain in the ass. There are types of wisteria native to North America, but Asian wisteria like this is invasive. Like kudzu, it swallows entire groves whole so it's nothing for it to gobble up a single tree like this.

























This is a warehouse complex now reborn as retail. If the signs are any indication, it served the Poe Mill, not the Brandon Mill.





This is black horsetail reed. I'm planting a Japanese garden at my house, and I want some of this. It's bamboo-ish, without the danger, when planting actual bamboo, of it going to visit the neighbors.



We stopped for coffee. I got a lavender cardamom latte that I highly recommend.







[



Old and new. Over time houses get lost to fire or decay, but in places like West Greenville Village, you often get replacements that are hip and fresh and with-it, and new, and now.





For all your empanada and international dance needs.



[









One of the two main hospitals that serve Greenville. This is St. Francis-Bon Secours. The other is Greenville Memorial Hospital-Prisma Health. Both Bon Secours and Prisma operate numerous smaller hospitals across the area, but for whatever reason they both like to keep their main hospitals close enough to keep an eye on each other. Greenville Memorial is just a few blocks away.



Another mill, the Piedmont Plush Mills, which used to make exactly what it said on the label: Plush fabric, including car upholstery, mohair, and velour. It also manufactured stage curtains. It was founded in 1925 and closed in 1983. The building now houses a coworking site, and there are plans to build office buildings on the rest of the campus.



Look at the map on the right and you'll see several of Greenville's mills and where they were, or are still, located. Of the mills on the list, from bottom to top the Dunean Mill, Franklin Mill, and Poinsett Mill are still operating industrial ventures (one of which still makes auditorium curtains), Mills Mill, Judson Mill, Brandon Mill, Woodside Mill, and Monaghan Mill are residential buildings, and the Riverdale Mill and American Spinning Mills are still abandoned. There are plans to redevelop the American Spinning Mills site, as well as the Poe Mill, which burned down except for its smokestacks. There's also a plan to redevelop the Union Bleachery in that same part of town, that would essentially create a new urbanist development around the ruins of the bleachery. Greenville would gain a second downtown if it all came to fruition. And speaking of, the shell of the Huguenot Mill in the heart of downtown is preserved as a unique event venue on the grounds of the performing arts center.





Now, you might ask yourself what sort of people worked in the mills of a Southern industrial city like Greenville. It was people like this. This is a photo of actual Piedmont Plush Mills workers from way back in the day, although you'll note those two on the far right still seem to know what's up even now.



After all this, our ambition was well and truly thwarted when we headed over to Unity Park, only to find it filled to capacity with some sort of special event. There were too many children running around and it made us nervous, so we tabled the plan to go take photos of public art.

And a few hours later, to make up for the burger, we went to my favorite restaurant, whose decor features a tile mural of perhaps the world's least threatening luchador.







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"To sustain the life of a large, modern city in this cloying, clinging heat is an amazing achievement. It is no wonder that the white men and women in Greenville walk with a slow, dragging pride, as if they had taken up a challenge and intended to defy it without end." -- Rebecca West for The New Yorker, 1947

Last edited by hauntedheadnc; Mar 21, 2023 at 10:29 AM.
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  #32  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2023, 1:11 AM
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This is awesome. I love the falls running through downtown

That Brandon Mills residential conversion has to have some long-ass hallways?

Humidity sucks. I'm going to Miami in a few weeks and I can't stress enough to my native Arizonan gf how much it knocks you on your ass if you're used to arid climates.
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  #33  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2023, 10:22 AM
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This is awesome. I love the falls running through downtown

That Brandon Mills residential conversion has to have some long-ass hallways?

Humidity sucks. I'm going to Miami in a few weeks and I can't stress enough to my native Arizonan gf how much it knocks you on your ass if you're used to arid climates.
Greenville really makes the best of its little river, and anywhere you find even the suggestion of a waterfall, the city has pounced on it and enshrined it in parkland. That's the case for the big waterfall in the heart of downtown, but the smaller falls further down have been made into an attraction at the Grand Bohemian Hotel, another falls are a focal point of Cancer Survivors Park, yet another small falls are the focal point of the Rock Quarry Garden, and yet another are part of the main downtown park complex, up near the Governor's School for the Arts. Whether its a swamp, a mountain, a ditch of a river, or a waterfall of any size, Greenville knows how to make the best use of its natural assets.

Regarding that mill, you know, I took a look at the site for West Village Lofts, which is what occupies the Brandon Mill now, but it didn't show any full maps of the building. Just individual units -- which are really nice. And interesting... some of the unit designs don't have windows in the bedrooms, which probably makes for really good sleep when you don't have to worry about the sun jabbing at you through the curtains.

And when it comes to humidity... Except for a brutal cold snap at Christmas that saw the temperature here get down to 7F, we haven't really had much of a winter. Things started blooming in February, and as March has moved along the spring has been more like what I was used to up in North Carolina: this blooms, then that, this, then that, when normally here everything blooms all at once and for a couple of weeks the entire place is swimming in flowers. However, with the spring having come so early, I've been outside busily working on my yard, trying to get as much into the ground as humanly possible before summer, and its humidity, arrive. Last year in June it was hitting 100F and above for days on end, and then July and August were slightly more reasonable but still utterly miserable. I know I'm not going to want to garden when the humidity is just sloppy outside so I'm trying to get it all done now, with the hope that over the summer I'll just need to sneak out under cover of darkness and weed things.
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"To sustain the life of a large, modern city in this cloying, clinging heat is an amazing achievement. It is no wonder that the white men and women in Greenville walk with a slow, dragging pride, as if they had taken up a challenge and intended to defy it without end." -- Rebecca West for The New Yorker, 1947

Last edited by hauntedheadnc; Mar 21, 2023 at 10:32 AM.
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  #34  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2023, 2:54 PM
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Nice set of pics! Very interesting history of the mill and its workers.

Pendleton Street looks like a nice funky business district.



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Originally Posted by hauntedheadnc View Post
Regarding that mill, you know, I took a look at the site for West Village Lofts, which is what occupies the Brandon Mill now, but it didn't show any full maps of the building. Just individual units -- which are really nice. And interesting... some of the unit designs don't have windows in the bedrooms, which probably makes for really good sleep when you don't have to worry about the sun jabbing at you through the curtains.
That's interesting about the bedrooms with no windows... I think in California, legally, for a room to be considered a bedroom, it has to have a window. I learned this decades ago when apartment hunting; for example, an apartment owner can't say that he has a 2-bedroom apartment for rent if one of the "bedrooms" doesn't have a window; it can just be a very large closet or more living space, or something.
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Old Posted Mar 21, 2023, 3:20 PM
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That's interesting about the bedrooms with no windows... I think in California, legally, for a room to be considered a bedroom, it has to have a window. I learned this decades ago when apartment hunting; for example, an apartment owner can't say that he has a 2-bedroom apartment for rent if one of the "bedrooms" doesn't have a window; it can just be a very large closet or more living space, or something.
I'm pretty sure that's the law in North Carolina as well. I don't know if it's the law in South Carolina or how the lofts got around it if it is, unless it has something to do with historic preservation or something.
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Old Posted Mar 21, 2023, 4:01 PM
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Originally Posted by hauntedheadnc View Post
And when it comes to humidity... Except for a brutal cold snap at Christmas that saw the temperature here get down to 7F, we haven't really had much of a winter. Things started blooming in February, and as March has moved along the spring has been more like what I was used to up in North Carolina: this blooms, then that, this, then that, when normally here everything blooms all at once and for a couple of weeks the entire place is swimming in flowers. However, with the spring having come so early, I've been outside busily working on my yard, trying to get as much into the ground as humanly possible before summer, and its humidity, arrive. Last year in June it was hitting 100F and above for days on end, and then July and August were slightly more reasonable but still utterly miserable. I know I'm not going to want to garden when the humidity is just sloppy outside so I'm trying to get it all done now, with the hope that over the summer I'll just need to sneak out under cover of darkness and weed things.
I think the West Coast got the Winter weather that the East Coast usually gets. Its snowing again in Flagstaff, but as of 3/1, the snowfall total for this year (we usually get whatever California gets) is 140 inches. Its been a brutally snowy Winter this year and while I'm looking forward to sunshine, we'll be going from one extreme to another.

I'm from Ohio, but I've lived out west so long now that I can't tolerate humidity. My mom and I drove to Ohio the week after Fourth of July last year and it was miserable from Amarillo all the way to Columbus, the worst of it felt in Tulsa, Springfield and St. Louis. Oddly enough, the weather was pleasant in Columbus while I was there (low 80s, low humidity).

I know the temperatures in Phoenix are extreme, but there is some solace in it being a literal dry heat until the monsoons start up.
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  #37  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2023, 8:14 PM
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hauntedheadnc hauntedheadnc is offline
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Location: Greenville, SC - "Birthplace of the light switch rave"
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Saturday, March 23, 2023

Greenville, SC: Signs of Life


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Just some odds and ends from the past couple of days. We went shopping for plants, then Asian mushrooms and curry paste this morning.















































Meanwhile at home, spring is here and the paperbush is starting to wake up.



Likewise the autumn ferns in my fern garden. My hope this year is to make some significant progress on my Japanese garden, finish my fern garden, and, if I'm feeling really ambitious I'll finish the front flower garden. Next year I'll tackle the shrub garden.











Edit: Turns out the day wasn't quite over.







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"To sustain the life of a large, modern city in this cloying, clinging heat is an amazing achievement. It is no wonder that the white men and women in Greenville walk with a slow, dragging pride, as if they had taken up a challenge and intended to defy it without end." -- Rebecca West for The New Yorker, 1947

Last edited by hauntedheadnc; Mar 25, 2023 at 10:46 PM.
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  #38  
Old Posted May 31, 2023, 3:03 AM
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This thread has more meaning now that I've been in Greenville, and you had a chance to explain some things in detail
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  #39  
Old Posted May 31, 2023, 10:02 AM
mrnyc mrnyc is offline
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oh boy i love the plant store pics — very timely as im going to a nice one like that near us today:

https://www.gerardisfarmersmarket.com/gallery
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  #40  
Old Posted May 31, 2023, 11:38 AM
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hauntedheadnc hauntedheadnc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrnyc View Post
oh boy i love the plant store pics — very timely as im going to a nice one like that near us today:

https://www.gerardisfarmersmarket.com/gallery
Our winter here ended early, in February, so pretty much every weekend since then I've been hitting up either the nurseries -- there are three that I like which have good prices, and one that I like which does not have good prices -- or the big-box stores like Lowes, and even occasionally Wal-Mart, where I found an excellent price on Japanese maples this past weekend and got three of them for my nascent Japanese garden. I think my favorite find of the season was black mondo grass, also for the Japanese garden, and which seems to be loving life where I planted it, as it almost immediately started putting out little purple flowers.
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"To sustain the life of a large, modern city in this cloying, clinging heat is an amazing achievement. It is no wonder that the white men and women in Greenville walk with a slow, dragging pride, as if they had taken up a challenge and intended to defy it without end." -- Rebecca West for The New Yorker, 1947
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