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  #1  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2021, 8:09 PM
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Feb 2021: Birmingham, Salt Lake City & Jacksonville Have Lowest Jobless Rates Among L

oops. I meant among "Large Metro Areas".

This is the latest data from the US Labor Dept, released this week.

https://www.bls.gov/web/metro/laulrgma.htm
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  #2  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2021, 8:12 PM
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I think Jacksonville has been one of the fastest growing metro areas over the past two years.
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  #3  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2021, 11:20 PM
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Originally Posted by 202_Cyclist View Post
I think Jacksonville has been one of the fastest growing metro areas over the past two years.
Don't think that growth alone is the reason for some of the cities unemployment rates. Detroit and Cleveland have lower rates than Austin and Phoenix but those Midwestern cities are not growing faster. I think rate has more to do with the interplay with the job growth, population growth, and unemployment before the pandemic.

Last edited by DCReid; Apr 9, 2021 at 11:22 PM. Reason: Errors
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  #4  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2021, 11:43 PM
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All in Red states. Interesting.
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  #5  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2021, 11:57 PM
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Cities in states that opened their economies earlier during the pandemic...? I would imagine most of these jobs would be workers returning to their restaurant and hospitality jobs?
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  #6  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2021, 12:30 AM
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Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
Cities in states that opened their economies earlier during the pandemic...? I would imagine most of these jobs would be workers returning to their restaurant and hospitality jobs?

That probably explains some of it, and also the structure of the local economy. For instance, Michigan had a more strict lockdown than Georgia, but Detroit has a lower unemployment rate than Atlanta. I would guess that's because Detroit's job market is less tourism and services oriented than Atlanta. On the other hand, Chicago, L.A., and NYC are big tourist cities but located in states with rules similar to Michigan, so more people out of work.
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  #7  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2021, 12:59 AM
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That probably explains some of it, and also the structure of the local economy. For instance, Michigan had a more strict lockdown than Georgia, but Detroit has a lower unemployment rate than Atlanta. I would guess that's because Detroit's job market is less tourism and services oriented than Atlanta. On the other hand, Chicago, L.A., and NYC are big tourist cities but located in states with rules similar to Michigan, so more people out of work.
Yep. Some of it is probably pandemic related restrictions (or lack thereof), but in B’ham for example, the economy has a lot of healthcare, professional services (banking, law, etc), logistics/distribution, and (some) manufacturing. Those services weren’t as affected by the pandemic, and in some cases (healthcare/logistics) were as busy as ever. Yet it doesn’t rely heavily—or much at all—on tourism, for example.

Still, it’s encouraging to see B’ham as number 1 here.
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  #8  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2021, 3:01 AM
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Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
That probably explains some of it, and also the structure of the local economy. For instance, Michigan had a more strict lockdown than Georgia, but Detroit has a lower unemployment rate than Atlanta. I would guess that's because Detroit's job market is less tourism and services oriented than Atlanta. On the other hand, Chicago, L.A., and NYC are big tourist cities but located in states with rules similar to Michigan, so more people out of work.
Partly but also what the nature of the employment in the city is. Tourism-based economies suffered (see Las Vegas). Also notice how Tampa and Jacksonville have among the lowest jobless rate. People will say, see Florida opened up early. But Orlando and Miami are in the bottom half with higher than average jobless rates. Their jobs are more dependent on tourism and international travel/trade.
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  #9  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2021, 5:19 PM
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Metro unemployment rates are not seasonally adjusted, and seasonal fluctuations are stronger in cold weather cities than warm ones. Bear that in mind when looking at the numbers.
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  #10  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2021, 8:24 PM
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Birmingham is a delightful surprise, definitely welcome in the state of Alabama.
Salt Lake City has had a strong economy since I can remember.
Jacksonville is in Florida with huge city limit boundaries that can accommodate campus style business parks and jobs.
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  #11  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2021, 8:28 PM
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Whats going on in Jackonville? I know its a running joke that its probably growing and has a low unemployment rate because of its incredible skyline (which btw was the first skyline I can remember as a kid, and I fell in love with skyscrapers because of it lol), but really, why is it doing so well in so many metrics?


Also Birmingham, has the city made a turn into becoming potentially a "hip" city in the future?
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  #12  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2021, 9:34 PM
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Also Birmingham, has the city made a turn into becoming potentially a "hip" city in the future?
You already have Nashville and Raleigh/Durham as shining stars I see other mid-sized Mid-South cities like Birmingham, Tulsa, Chattanooga and Greenville really starting to take off. If Memphis can get its crime under control it could be the next Nashville.
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  #13  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2021, 10:43 PM
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No surprise . Southern mid sized cities are killing it as northern metropoli add taxes , orient education around fighting ‘white supremacy’ , and experience massive decreases in public safety . The migration will only grow
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  #14  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2021, 12:01 AM
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The only reason anyone lives in Jacksonville is for work...any of those cities at the top really. I lived in Birmingham once....for my job. I think the only reason these oddball cities are at the the top is because work send them there. Also Jacksonville’s skyline.
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  #15  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2021, 12:09 AM
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Originally Posted by IluvATX View Post
The only reason anyone lives in Jacksonville is for work...any of those cities at the top really. I lived in Birmingham once....for my job. I think the only reason these oddball cities are at the the top is because work send them there. Also Jacksonville’s skyline.
Isn't the reason most of us live anywhere? For work.
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  #16  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2021, 1:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Camelback View Post
Isn't the reason most of us live anywhere? For work.
Someone on SSP said the other day the main reason people live somewhere is because of architecture and landscapes LOL

Not the obvious reasons:
1. COL
2. Family
3. Work
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  #17  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2021, 1:53 AM
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Originally Posted by IluvATX View Post
The only reason anyone lives in Jacksonville is for work...any of those cities at the top really. I lived in Birmingham once....for my job. I think the only reason these oddball cities are at the the top is because work send them there. Also Jacksonville’s skyline.
It also could be that compared to most places up north, Jacksonville offers a combination of a better climate, cost of living and job market. Plus Jacksonville is right on the ocean. I moved to Texas 20 years ago because the economy in New York was terrible and the warmer climate was an added bonus.
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  #18  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2021, 2:07 AM
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Originally Posted by jtown,man View Post
Also Birmingham, has the city made a turn into becoming potentially a "hip" city in the future?
It’s quietly been reinventing itself over the past decade or so. The urban core is actually pretty large, has decent bones, and is on a grid system with lots of parking lots and old buildings to be developed/renovated. Near UAB on the south side, there have been a ton of large apartment and condo projects built and under construction over that time. UAB itself is, I think, coming into its own. It’s growing and has some good to great programs. The restaurant and bar/brewery scene is good too.

On a regional level, it’s getting a lot of new distribution/logistics business, as it sits at the meeting point of four interstates. And I think most of the other big industries here are doing fine. The city’s population is pretty stable with steady metro growth. On top of all that, it’s a pretty warm climate with some decent scenery and outdoor amenities.

All that to say, it seems to be successfully transitioning from a southern rust belt vibe to a new south economy. I’d be surprised if it booms like Raleigh or Nashville anytime soon, but it’s positioning itself well for future success.

Major challenges: Crime and shaking off the stigma of being in Alabama.
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  #19  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2021, 2:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Nomad9 View Post
It’s quietly been reinventing itself over the past decade or so. The urban core is actually pretty large, has decent bones, and is on a grid system with lots of parking lots and old buildings to be developed/renovated. Near UAB on the south side, there have been a ton of large apartment and condo projects built and under construction over that time. UAB itself is, I think, coming into its own. It’s growing and has some good to great programs. The restaurant and bar/brewery scene is good too.

On a regional level, it’s getting a lot of new distribution/logistics business, as it sits at the meeting point of four interstates. And I think most of the other big industries here are doing fine. The city’s population is pretty stable with steady metro growth. On top of all that, it’s a pretty warm climate with some decent scenery and outdoor amenities.

All that to say, it seems to be successfully transitioning from a southern rust belt vibe to a new south economy. I’d be surprised if it booms like Raleigh or Nashville anytime soon, but it’s positioning itself well for future success.

Major challenges: Crime and shaking off the stigma of being in Alabama.
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  #20  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2021, 3:28 AM
jtown,man jtown,man is offline
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Originally Posted by Nomad9 View Post
It’s quietly been reinventing itself over the past decade or so. The urban core is actually pretty large, has decent bones, and is on a grid system with lots of parking lots and old buildings to be developed/renovated. Near UAB on the south side, there have been a ton of large apartment and condo projects built and under construction over that time. UAB itself is, I think, coming into its own. It’s growing and has some good to great programs. The restaurant and bar/brewery scene is good too.

On a regional level, it’s getting a lot of new distribution/logistics business, as it sits at the meeting point of four interstates. And I think most of the other big industries here are doing fine. The city’s population is pretty stable with steady metro growth. On top of all that, it’s a pretty warm climate with some decent scenery and outdoor amenities.

All that to say, it seems to be successfully transitioning from a southern rust belt vibe to a new south economy. I’d be surprised if it booms like Raleigh or Nashville anytime soon, but it’s positioning itself well for future success.

Major challenges: Crime and shaking off the stigma of being in Alabama.
Thanks.

From Googlemaps it looks like the downtown to UAB core area is quite large and has a lot of potential, but are there a decent amount of older traditional neighborhoods that are booming also?
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