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ethereal_reality Nov 22, 2015 6:28 PM

:previous: Fantastic set of Shulman photographs Hoss. Beautiful color.


originally posted by HossC
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800...911/lVKGOm.jpg
google.books


Here's a layout from the 1950s that shows where the Rendezvous Ballroom was located in relation to Balboa Pavilion.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/911/DHXP9a.jpg
https://www.flickr.com/photos/496897...3843/lightbox/




below: "Late 1930s Early 40s aerial of the Rendezvous"

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/908/d2PTem.jpg
https://www.flickr.com/photos/496897...3843/lightbox/

"Something is going on as all the parking lots in the area are full. Even the gas stations seem to be parking cars.
So this had to be pre Dec 1941 or post Aug. 1945. The cars look late 30s but I can't be sure."
-Barry Kazmer-flickr

__

Noircitydame Nov 22, 2015 6:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by westcork (Post 7243747)
It's so cool to see a whole series of photos like that.

Quote:

Originally Posted by AlvaroLegido (Post 7244076)
I guess I'm not the only one noirisher to think of that : which one NCD is your grand-mother ?

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Maddox Roberts (Post 7243581)
NoirCity Dame, Those are some of the greatest photos I've seen on this site. The architecture and neighborhoods are wonderful, but real life as it was lived in old L.A. is what this site is all about, as far as I'm concerned.

My mom has the beach photos of that day blown up to poster-size and framed. I've always loved them.

My Grandmother, Lorraine, is on the right end, in the hurraches. I wish I knew the names of the other gals. They stayed in touch for years, though scattered abround LA didn't see each other very often. They had a nickname for themselves that I can't remember, the "[Something] Gang."

AlvaroLegido Nov 22, 2015 8:34 PM

The top of Bunker Hill
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 7244588)

A twofold answer to the old question : where was the top of Bunker Hill ?
Without the Victorians and apartment buildings, I see two competing tops : at Third and Olive (Angels Flight Station) and at Second and Grand.

tovangar2 Nov 22, 2015 10:15 PM

Congregational Church, Vine Street
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 7241404)

That little building you pointed out, with the north facing steps, was actually part of the Union Congregational Church complex, next door to the Vine Street School (formerly "Colegrove School").

John Bengtson, in his book "Silent Echos", identifies it as the Congregational Sunday School building and mentions that it appears both in Chaplin's "The Fireman" (1916) and Keaton's "One Week" (1920)

Here, the subject building is on the left margin. The camera is looking south down Lillian Way from just below Eleanor.
The Lone Star Studio, such as it was then, is on the right:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-1...8%252520PM.jpg
The Fireman (1916) Lone Star Studios

The building later played Buster Keaton's wedding venue. The camera is facing south:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-d...1%252520PM.jpg
One Week (1920) Metro/Keaton Studios

Union Congregational Church bought the facility from the Episcopalians:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-n...2%252520PM.jpg
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-e...3%252520PM.jpg
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-3...8%252520PM.jpg
cdnc / la herald, 31 january 1908

Andys Nov 23, 2015 1:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sadykadie2 (Post 7241655)
My husband works in Glendale and this is Hyperion Avenue. Some people call it the Hyperion Bridge :tup:

Yeah, it's commonly known as the Hyperion Bridge. I used to live in Atwater (Village), which is off in the distance in this postcard, and walked the Hyperion Bridge daily for three years while attending Marshall High School in the 60's.

Andys

Those Who Squirm! Nov 23, 2015 2:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 7244118)
If I were writing a screenplay, I'd have my main character arrive in Los Angeles on the Super Chief, and then have him stop at the Apache for a cocktail.

__

It's too bad that throughout the film noir genre, it often seems that Greyhound buses are the only type of intercity transportation in existence. Not always, of course, but in quite a few of those films for sure.

tovangar2 Nov 23, 2015 3:31 AM

Union Station arrivals
 
:previous:

"Cry Danger" doesn't disappoint:

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 6065266)
Title card (a train is seen zipping though orange groves; we're headed for LA):
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-W...710%2520PM.jpg
RKO Radio Pictures / netflix


Flyingwedge Nov 23, 2015 6:17 AM

More Woolen Mill
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 7244585)
Wow 1876!! Thanks for 'unearthing' this photograph Flyingwedge.

So how does a woolen mill work? Why did it need that high 'trestle' leading to the roof of the building-

_

That might be a flume carrying water to the big tank. The map below appears to show the flume,
along with what I guess is Woolen Mill Creek in the little ravine immediately south of the mill.

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...o.jpg~original

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...j.jpg~original
1875 Map of Canal and Reservoir Company Land @ Huntington Digital Library -- http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...d/12985/rec/11

Chapulín is Spanish for Grasshopper.

CityBoyDoug Nov 23, 2015 6:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Flyingwedge (Post 7245024)
That might be a flume carrying water to the big tank.

Chapulín is Spanish for Grasshopper.



Grasshopper in Spanish is: Saltamontes

Chapulines, plural for chapulín are small grasshoppers of the genus Sphenarium, that are commonly eaten in certain areas of Mexico. The term is specific to Mexico and derives from the Nahuatl word chapolin

tovangar2 Nov 23, 2015 8:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug (Post 7240737)
Taken somewhere over Los Angeles in 1945. That's all I know about this picture.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ps0dtnottb.jpg
CD file

That's a postcard image from 1925 by an unknown photographer.

The plane is a Curtis JN-4 "Jenny", cruising speed, 40-60 MPH.

The man in the foreground is Ivan Unger.

The woman in the high-heeled boots is Gladys Roy.

The pair were members of the "13 Black Cats" famous wing-walkers of the 1920s. There were many other troops, including "The 5 Blackbirds" (all African-American) and "Mabel Cody's Flying Circus", headed up by Buffalo Bill's niece. Charles Lindbergh was a wing-walker.

Roy (née Smith), from Minnesota, moved to Los Angeles in 1921. She also maintained a residence in her home state. All three of her siblings were flyers too.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-t...2%252520AM.jpg
air&space

Roy was killed in 1927, at the age of 27, when she, apparently momentarily distracted, walked into the spinning propeller of a parked plane she had just exited after a photo shoot:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-p...4%252520AM.jpg
findagrave

Gladys Roy's IMDB page is here

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-7...8%252520AM.jpg
slideshare

I couldn't find anything else on Unger.

........................................................................................

Quote:

Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug (Post 7245036)
Chapulines, plural for chapulín are small grasshoppers of the genus Sphenarium, that are commonly eaten in certain areas of Mexico.

They're delicious fried, but I've been vegan for a long time now, so haven't indulged lately.

_____________

tovangar2 Nov 23, 2015 5:43 PM

Down by the old mill stream...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Flyingwedge (Post 7244340)
Looking west across Figueroa at the former Coulter's woolen mill, c. 1931. Its four chimneys make the building easy to identify:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...1.jpg~original
USCDL -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/re...coll65/id/1926

"Mr Coulter had a woolen mill over the hill near the present corner of Figueroa and Fifth Streets. The old brick walls of this factory may still be seen
- the main part of a modern-fronted garage. There was a little stream there called Los Reyes"


Bixby Smith's quote from "Adobe Days" is wonderfully confirmed by your photo. I am so pleased to see it. Such a handsome building.
Your series of images, showing the mill transitioning from rural outpost to an urban setting, was both typical for LA and totally astounding.

e_r tells us that the Bernard Bros built the mill in 1872.

I was delighted to see "Mill Street" on your plat map. Other blocks, from the same series show, "Canal St" was the next
street west of Mill St:

Quote:

Originally Posted by Flyingwedge (Post 7245024)
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...j.jpg~original
1875 Map of Canal and Reservoir Company Land @ Huntington Digital Library -- http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...d/12985/rec/11

:previous:
As you indicated, the flume entered the back of the mill (#3) on a trestle. The waste water exited at the front of the building,
and, after being piped under Pearl St, continued on its way, together with the stream.

Woolen Mill Ditch, in those days, carried the waters from Los Reyes (together, apparently, with LA River water captured at Elysian Park), which started above Echo Park Lake,
and, after filling that (and a swimming hole at 2nd and Beaudry), made its way down through the hills to sometimes cause flooding havoc at 5th and Flower.
The Los Angeles Canal and Reservoir Company made these changes, in part, to power industry.

I'm guessing that the trestle delivered water to a wheel to power the mill to spin the wool (?) I can't quite work that out.
LOL, the technology is lost on me.

Glover, 1877:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-m...6%252520PM.jpg
loc

After the mill ceased operations, the facility became an ice company. By 1909, the building was a garage (it got a concrete floor that year and "two new openings").

In 1919, the garage (still owned by the BF Coulter Association) got the "modern front" that Bixby Smith mentions and the photo above shows:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-3...3%252520PM.jpg
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-D...9%252520PM.jpg
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-m...3%252520PM.jpg
ladbs

I wasn't able to locate the demo permit.


The mill must be just out of shot to the right in this post-1886 view (I think the shed, south of the mill, and the tank are just in view though). I kept missing it:
Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 7235170)

:previous:
Note the little arroyo (behind the dark house in the center foreground at the NW corner of 5th and Flower), which carried Los Reyes and the
waste water away from the mill. The waste water was piped under what-was-then Pearl Street (as shown) before being, once again, exposed to the air.

Note that the water was piped under Flower St too.

5th and Flower today, now Ray Bradbury Square:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/1m...366-h768-rw-no
google maps


1876: The shed and tank on the south side of the mill and the flume on its trestle. The stream is hidden by the berm in the foreground:
Quote:

Originally Posted by Flyingwedge (Post 7245024)

One memory of Los Reyes' course. I've read others:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-z...0%252520PM.jpg
LAT via creek freak



Thank you again so much.


P.S.

Here's the info I was looking for:

"Echo park, containing thirty acres, is another park evolved from the city’s refuse lands. In 1868 the city council contracted with the Los Angeles Canal & Reservoir Company,
a corporation, with a capital of $200,000, of which George Hansen was president and J. J. Warner, secretary, to construct a system of reservoirs and canals in the northwestern
part of the city. The reservoirs were to be filled by water from the river conducted in a canal. A dam, twenty feet high, was built across a canon near the head of the Arroyo de
Los Reyes and a ditch following the canon of this arroyo down to Pearl street, now Figueroa, was constructed. This zanja in later years was known as the Woolen Mill ditch.

Los Angeles had an ambition to become a manufacturing city. The water brought down by the ditch could be used for power to propel machinery and for irrigation. The ditch was
extended down to the southern part of the city. For this improvement the company was to receive several thousand acres of hill land in the northwest part of the city. In 1873
a woolen mill was built on the line of this ditch near Figueroa and Fifth streets, and for a decade or so manufactured a fair quality of blankets. Then it was turned into an ice
factory. Competition froze it out. The Woolen Mill ditch disappeared before the march of improvement and all the city has left for its leagues of land is a pond or reservoir now
known as Echo Lake. The other reservoirs that appear on the old maps as reservoirs 1, 2, and 3 were never completed. The land surrounding reservoir No. 4 (Echo Lake) was
converted into a park and the land below the dam—about four and one half acres—belonging to the city was converted into a children’s playground. Echo Lake is the largest
body of water in any of the parks."

-A History of California and an Extended History of Los Angeles and Environs by James Miller Guinn (1915)

Also this.

__

John Maddox Roberts Nov 23, 2015 7:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug (Post 7245036)
Grasshopper in Spanish is: Saltamontes

Chapulines, plural for chapulín are small grasshoppers of the genus Sphenarium, that are commonly eaten in certain areas of Mexico. The term is specific to Mexico and derives from the Nahuatl word chapolin
[/SIZE]

Also the origin of the name Chapultepec Castle in Mexico City, the famous "Halls of Montezuma" of the Marine Corps anthem. It's Nahuatl for "Grasshopper Hill."

CityBoyDoug Nov 23, 2015 8:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 7245054)
That's a postcard image from 1925 by an unknown photographer.

The plane is a Curtis JN-4 "Jenny", cruising speed, 40-60 MPH.

The man in the foreground is Ivan Unger.

The woman in the high-heeled boots is Gladys Roy.

The pair were members of the "13 Black Cats" famous wing-walkers of the 1920s. There were many other troops, including "The 5 Blackbirds" (all African-American) and "Mabel Cody's Flying Circus", headed up by Buffalo Bill's niece. Charles Lindbergh was a wing-walker.

Roy (née Smith), from Minnesota, moved to Los Angeles in 1921. She also maintained a residence in her home state. All three of her siblings were flyers too.


_____________

Didn't know that Lindbergh was a wing-walker. But I do know that he was a man of considerable controversy. At least his trip across the Atlantic was not faked.

tovangar2 Nov 23, 2015 8:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Maddox Roberts (Post 7245597)
Also the origin of the name Chapultepec Castle in Mexico City, the famous "Halls of Montezuma" of the Marine Corps anthem. It's Nahuatl for "Grasshopper Hill."

That's a neat bit of unforgettable info. Thank you.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-Y...5%252520PM.jpg
dronestagr video link

Quote:

Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug (Post 7245617)
Didn't know that Lindbergh was a wing-walker.

That's come up on the thread before. The story is told in "Charles Lindbergh, Groundbreaking Aviator" by Rebecca Rowel. The ebook preview is here. And also in "Lindbergh, a Biography" by Leonard Mosely. The ebook preview for that one is here



P.S.

The Lindbergh Memorial in Americus GA shows Lindbergh in a wing-walking pose


____

HossC Nov 23, 2015 8:34 PM

This Julius Shulman photoset is vaguely labeled "Job 5051: Miscellaneous Los Angeles Apartments (Los Angeles, Calif.),1973". The six pictures seem to cover three different buildings, two of which I've identified.

Initially, I couldn't see any clues to the location of these apartments.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...1.jpg~original

Then I spotted a name on the wall above the Beetle. Even at full-resolution, it's still hard to read, not least because the script is very similar in color to the background, and the shadows don't help either.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...2.jpg~original

By comparing the view above with the one below, and with some Googling, I managed to read "Château Brentana". That led me to 11666 Montana Avenue in Brentwood. The number 11666 is just visible in the shadows of the trees in the view below. I assume that "Brentana" is just a simple portmanteau of Brentwood and Montana.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...3.jpg~original

With the help of GSV to study the building opposite, I'm happy that this is the entrance to the Château Brentana apartments.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...4.jpg~original

This location was considerably easier to find, mainly due to the street name being part of the apartment name, and a visible street number. The address of the Bedford Terrace apartments is 1054 S Bedford Street.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...5.jpg~original

The last picture in the set is a mystery. I can't see any clues to narrow my search. Does anyone recognize it?

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...6.jpg~original

All from Getty Research Institute

Today, it's very hard to see Château Brentana behind the trees, although the street number is now more prominent. The property websites give a build date of 1969. I like the little green Triumph TR250 at the front.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...7.jpg~original
GSV

Bedford Terrace is equally well hidden. This is the only view I found where some of the name is visible. It seems to have been built in 1965.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...8.jpg~original
GSV

Silverlaker Nov 23, 2015 9:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 7244102)
Bus slide.

This location is pretty easy.....behind the bus is the orange "mock-awning" of Googies at 5th & Olive, downtown.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/128...905/7vKAIz.jpg
eBay

And you get a glimpse of the church that used to stand behind the San Carlos Hotel.

__

I was delighted to see this picture of the old German church. Usually just get glimpses of parts of it in the corners of some other photos and have not seen one as full as this. Went there a few times in the 70s/early 80s with my grandfather as they still had a German language service there on Sundays. I wish I had brought my camera and taken photos of the inside and the stained glass windows! It was kind of a dodgy area then and the front smelled like urine sometimes, but inside was really cool and moody.

HossC Nov 23, 2015 9:54 PM

Here's a better view of the First German United Methodist Church from the mid-80s. It also shows the San Carlos Hotel and Googies. The Biltmore Tower is under construction in the background.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...h.jpg~original
USC Digital Library

Beaudry Nov 23, 2015 11:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 7245765)
Here's a better view of the First German United Methodist Church from the mid-80s. It also shows the San Carlos Hotel and Googies. The Biltmore Tower is under construction in the background.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...h.jpg~original
USC Digital Library

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/128...905/7vKAIz.jpg

I did a total spit-take when I saw this. Felt like Danny Thomas.

And Silverlaker, what a wonderful recollection!

The best color shot I'd seen so far was this:

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5829/...0a3a9ef9_o.png
which I'd found here

...on a site in which they say the image is from 1995; I reckon one of these Zschorlauern just have their memory off by a few years, as the demo permit is pulled in '88 and the Gas Tower was undergoing construction soon after. (That neon sign with the cross was added in 1959, btw.)
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5699/...7d766329_z.jpg

Here's the original plan for the church, from February 1910,

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/708/2...dc8d8587_c.jpg
(Walker & Vawter)

but after the Auditorium Hotel was built,
https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2106/...d84dacb3_o.gif
"the designs first prepared...have been altered with the view to making the architecture of a sturdier type to harmonize with the new Auditorium Hotel building a the northwest corner of Fifth and Olive and with the Clara Barton Hospital, immediately adjoining the church site on the north." (LAT June 12, 1910) They lay the cornerstone in August.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3183/...8c8c0431_o.gif

Of course it had two taller towers
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3235/...d32ef8c49a.jpg
but they were removed after Sylmar.

Someone out there's got a first-rate image of the pre-Sylmar (and pre-1950 removal of the gable ends) 449 Olive German ME. I'm going to have to start knocking on some Methodist church doors around town. In the meantime I've got a fat bid in on that eBay slide!

HossC Nov 23, 2015 11:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beaudry (Post 7245846)
Of course it had two taller towers
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3235/...d32ef8c49a.jpg
but they were removed after Sylmar.

Someone out there's got a first-rate image of the pre-Sylmar (and pre-1950 removal of the gable ends) 449 Olive German ME. I'm going to have to start knocking on some Methodist church doors around town.

LAPL has a couple of shots of the First German United Methodist Church. It's only in the background of this 1958 picture.

"View of the Pacific Telephone Mobile Emergency Service trailer switchboard, which is parked at 433 S. Olive. The mobile switchboard unit can move right into any disaster area and save hours of communication failure time. Photograph dated October 7, 1958. In the upper left is the First German Methodist Church, later demolished."

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...2.jpg~original
LAPL

Here's a slightly better view of the taller towers from 1928.

"Olive Street between 4th and 5th Streets in 1928, looking south toward Pershing Square and the Biltmore Hotel. Cars are seen, and a Savoy Auto Park is at right. Also at right is a small German-speaking church, the First German Methodist Episcopal Church (later United Methodist), founded in 1876."

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...3.jpg~original
LAPL

The church and San Carlos Hotel were gone by 1989.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...4.jpg~original
California State Library

HenryHuntington Nov 24, 2015 5:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 7245765)
Here's a better view of the First German United Methodist Church from the mid-80s. It also shows the San Carlos Hotel and Googies. The Biltmore Tower is under construction in the background.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...h.jpg~original
USC Digital Library

Hoss & Beaudry, have I ever mentioned that you guys are amazing? :worship:

My father was the daytime parking lot attendant at 447 S. Olive ca. 1954-61. During summer vacations, he'd occasionally give my mom a break by taking me to work with him, so to some degree I grew up on that block. Some of the fondest memories of my childhood involve breakfast at Googie's (short stack, glass of milk), playing handball off the building at the back of the lot, wandering through downtown and especially watching my dad and his evening relief dig cars out of the back spaces with stunt driver skills for early-departing commuters.

As the lot was near the Philharmonic Auditorium, he took care of a variety of celebs from the era - though they didn't always take care of him. I could name a few names, but they're all gone now and no point taking shots.

Thanks so much for those photos, even though the church isn't my personal focus.


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