HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Photography Forums > My City Photos


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2021, 6:59 PM
xzmattzx's Avatar
xzmattzx xzmattzx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 5,826
Capital of the Navajo Nation: Window Rock, AZ

Window Rock is an unincorporated community in Apache County next to the New Mexico border, and is the capital of the Navajo Nation. The population is around 3,000.

Window Rock was originally sparsely populated, until the 1930s when the Office of Indian Affairs established the community as a capital. The capital would also function as a "land use institute", to administer to soil conservation and oil production. The capital would consolidate

Window Rock was chosen as the location for the capital due to the notable hole in a face of rock, which bears cultural significance. Despite tribal leaders agreeing to the site for the central agency, most Navajo people considered it a desecration of a sacred place.

Today, Window Rock continues as the home of the Navajo Nation President and Vice President, Navajo Nation Supreme Court, and the 24-member Navajo Nation Council. Citizens of the nation, from Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, and Colorado come to the community on the weekdays.


The Navajo Nation Council Chamber, on Window Rock Loop Road. The capitol building was built in 1935, and is the only legislative headquarters in the US owned by an American Indian tribe which has been continuously in use by that tribe. It is the only true Navajo architecture in Window Rock, evoking a Navajo hogan.



The Navajo Nation Administration Building, on Window Rock Boulevard.



The administrative building was built in 1935, and is home to the Navajo Nation Office of the President and other administrative offices.



Window Rock Tribal Park, on Window Rock Loop Road.



The namesake window for the community is the centerpiece of the Tribal Park. The formation, "tségháhoodzání" in the Navajo language, means "rock with hole through it". It carries importance in the Navajo Nation as the place where the people met in the fall of 1868 to reaffirm their social and cultural practices.



"The Legendary Navajo Code Talkers" statue, in Window Rock Tribal Park. The statue was dedicated in 2004.



The Navajo Education Center, on Morgan Boulevard.



The Navajo Abandoned Mine Lands Reclamation Department Building, on Morgan Boulevard. The structure was originally the dispensary for the campus, and was built in 1936.



The Navajo Museum Library & Visitor's Center, on Navajo Street. The library was built in 1997.



The Diné Restaurant, inside the Quality Inn hotel at Main Street and Arizona Route 264. The restaurant is known as one of the best places in the United States to get Navajo cuisine.



The Window Rock Post Office, on Window Rock Loop Road.



Buildings on Window Rock Loop Road. Some road signs in Window Rock are in the Navajo language, although most road signs are in English.



A restaurant on Indian Route 12.



Bashas' Diné Market, on Arizona Route 264.



Houses on Shonto Boulevard.



A house on Tse Bonito.



Houses on Shonto Boulevard.



A house on Oljato Boulevard.



Houses on Kaibeto Drive.



The Window Rock Christian Center, on Mustang Drive.



A rodeo arena at the Navajo Nation Fair, on Arizona Route 264.

Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2021, 7:11 PM
plinko's Avatar
plinko plinko is offline
them bones
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Santa Barbara adjacent
Posts: 7,132
The Navajo (and Apache) Nations are such amazing lands. I haven't been to Window Rock in awhile, but last summer we drove from Farmington to Flagstaff the long way through. COVID has substantially infected these communities at much higher rates than many others, and the economic affects are nothing short of disastrous.

You're making me crave Fry Bread, and a Navajo Taco. Obviously it's lunchtime.
__________________
Even if you are 1 in a million, there are still 7,000 people just like you...
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2021, 6:18 PM
xzmattzx's Avatar
xzmattzx xzmattzx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 5,826
Quote:
Originally Posted by plinko View Post
The Navajo (and Apache) Nations are such amazing lands. I haven't been to Window Rock in awhile, but last summer we drove from Farmington to Flagstaff the long way through. COVID has substantially infected these communities at much higher rates than many others, and the economic affects are nothing short of disastrous.

You're making me crave Fry Bread, and a Navajo Taco. Obviously it's lunchtime.
I wanted to eat at that Navajo restaurant in the area, but it was closed because of the pandemic. I got a chance to try fry bread and a Navajo taco from a food truck in Santa Fe, though!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2021, 9:14 PM
BG918's Avatar
BG918 BG918 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 3,449
Quote:
Originally Posted by xzmattzx View Post
I wanted to eat at that Navajo restaurant in the area, but it was closed because of the pandemic. I got a chance to try fry bread and a Navajo taco from a food truck in Santa Fe, though!
If you're ever in Denver there is a Native American (Osage) restaurant called Tocabe that has fry bread/Indian tacos.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2021, 5:01 PM
fern's Avatar
fern fern is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: liverpool
Posts: 574
interesting place thanks for posting
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2021, 7:08 PM
geomorph's Avatar
geomorph geomorph is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Newport Beach
Posts: 2,840
Was the library and visitors center open? If so did you go in?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2021, 3:06 AM
xzmattzx's Avatar
xzmattzx xzmattzx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 5,826
Quote:
Originally Posted by geomorph View Post
Was the library and visitors center open? If so did you go in?
No, nothing was open. I even tried to place an order over the phone for food to go, and they answered the phone and after a while said that they couldn't serve me.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2021, 4:18 PM
mrnyc mrnyc is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 7,963
to hear about more tears and trials for these folks with the damn plague is breaking my heart, but this place was very interesting to see.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2021, 11:30 PM
Obadno Obadno is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 5,079
I am actually surprised by the extremely literal Navajo name for window rock
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2021, 10:43 PM
Pedestrian's Avatar
Pedestrian Pedestrian is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 20,169
Quote:
Originally Posted by plinko View Post
The Navajo (and Apache) Nations are such amazing lands. I haven't been to Window Rock in awhile, but last summer we drove from Farmington to Flagstaff the long way through. COVID has substantially infected these communities at much higher rates than many others, and the economic affects are nothing short of disastrous.

You're making me crave Fry Bread, and a Navajo Taco. Obviously it's lunchtime.
Fry bread stalls at Tucson's mission church of San Javier del Bac:


https://www.alamy.com/native-america...231369768.html

I wouldn't exactly call it taco-like. It's puffier (and better IMHO):


https://www.powwows.com/the-fry-brea...oenix-arizona/
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2021, 11:01 PM
Pedestrian's Avatar
Pedestrian Pedestrian is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 20,169
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrnyc View Post
to hear about more tears and trials for these folks with the damn plague is breaking my heart, but this place was very interesting to see.
The idea that the Native American people of Arizona are suffering more than others is kind of out-dated. It was somewhat true before the vaccines but the state and federal governments have made a great effort to get them vaccinated with a lot of success. Apache County is now the second most-vaxxed in the state and Navajo County is 4th--way ahead of all the white folks in Maricopa County.

Quote:
#2. Apache County

- Population that is fully vaccinated: 71.3% (51,241 fully vaccinated)
--- 38.4% higher vaccination rate than Arizona
- Population over 65 that is fully vaccinated: 89.4% (10,127 fully vaccinated)
--- 14.2% higher vaccination rate than Arizona
- Cumulative deaths per 100k: 662 (476 total deaths)
--- 138.1% more deaths per 100k residents than Arizona
- Cumulative cases per 100k: 18,351 (13,192 total cases)
--- 20.7% more cases per 100k residents than Arizona

#4. Navajo County

- Population that is fully vaccinated: 60.6% (67,246 fully vaccinated)
--- 17.7% higher vaccination rate than Arizona
- Population over 65 that is fully vaccinated: 85.0% (17,699 fully vaccinated)
--- 8.6% higher vaccination rate than Arizona
- Cumulative deaths per 100k: 539 (598 total deaths)
--- 93.9% more deaths per 100k residents than Arizona
- Cumulative cases per 100k: 17,977 (19,941 total cases)
--- 18.2% more cases per 100k residents than Arizona

#10. Maricopa County

- Population that is fully vaccinated: 48.4% (2,170,943 fully vaccinated)
--- 6.0% lower vaccination rate than Arizona
- Population over 65 that is fully vaccinated: 76.9% (535,644 fully vaccinated)
--- 1.8% lower vaccination rate than Arizona
- Cumulative deaths per 100k: 259 (11,598 total deaths)
--- 6.8% less deaths per 100k residents than Arizona
- Cumulative cases per 100k: 15,673 (703,008 total cases)
--- 3.1% more cases per 100k residents than Arizona
https://stacker.com/stories/11829/co...n-rate-arizona

And as a result, Apache County in particular is now doing pretty well:


https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/...vid-cases.html

The most-vaxxed county in the state, but the way, is Santa Cruz, smack on the border with most of its population in the town of Nogales. It's at an amazing 89.1% (that's got to be almost everyone over 12 and therefore eligible to be vaccinated) with almost all of those over 65 vaccinated.

Quote:
#1. Santa Cruz County

- Population that is fully vaccinated: 89.1% (41,436 fully vaccinated)
--- 73.0% higher vaccination rate than Arizona
- Population over 65 that is fully vaccinated: 99.9% (8,853 fully vaccinated)
--- 27.6% higher vaccination rate than Arizona
- Cumulative deaths per 100k: 411 (191 total deaths)
--- 47.8% more deaths per 100k residents than Arizona
- Cumulative cases per 100k: 18,992 (8,831 total cases)
--- 24.9% more cases per 100k residents than Arizona
https://stacker.com/stories/11829/co...n-rate-arizona

I'm not sure but Santa Cruz may have an excess of cases, hospitalizations and deaths because some Mexican have traditionally crossed the border to seek healthcare in Nogales and.or Tucson.

Last edited by Pedestrian; Oct 9, 2021 at 11:14 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2021, 11:06 PM
Pedestrian's Avatar
Pedestrian Pedestrian is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 20,169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Obadno View Post
I am actually surprised by the extremely literal Navajo name for window rock
Native American names tend to be literal. The name Tucson comes from the Tohono O'odham Cuk-Ṣon meaning "(at the) base of the black [hill]", a reference to a basalt-covered hill now known as Sentinel Peak.
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Photography Forums > My City Photos
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 3:21 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.