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Old Posted Oct 4, 2012, 9:25 PM
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Talking Unofficial New England Regional & Intercity Rail Proposals and Plans (Map)

Massachusetts - Rhode Island - Eastern Connecticut - Southern New Hampshire - 2050 Regional Rail Plan


https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msid...75764,6.696167

Believe it or not these are only half the Proposals the states have in the pipeline at least for Massachusetts & Eastern Connecticut. We covered Western Connecticut with the Metro North map , this is Eastern. I started this thread because the states seem to be accelerating there plans...and getting serious..

Eastern Connecticut & Western Massachusetts

-Shore line East , Increased speeds to 125mph
Stamford
Bridgeport
Stratford
Milford
New Haven Union Station
New Haven State Street
Branford
Guilford
Madison
Clinton
Westbrook
Old Saybrook
*Niantic
New London
*Noank
*Mystic
*Stonington

Westerly

-Central Manchester Branch - Electrfied , Uses EMU's from Central Manchester , top speed 90mph
Hartford Union Station
*East Hartford Main Street
*East Hartford
*Central Manchester
*I-84 Park & Ride
*Willimanatic
*Norwich
*Mohegan

New London

-Eastern Link , Uses Diesel DMU , top speed 80mph
New London
*Norwich
*Jewett City
*Danielson
*Putnam Disrect
*Webster

Worcester Union Station


-Knowledge Corridor added even more stations...Eventually Electrfied uses Push - Pulls or EMU's , Top Speed 125mph
*Brattleboro
*Greenfield
*South Deerfield
*Northampton
*Holyoke
*Willimansett
*Ferry Lane
*Springfield Waterfront
*Long Meadow
*Thompsonville
*Windsor Locks (moved)
*Windsor
*Hartford Union
*Parkville
*Newington
*Berlin
*Meriden
*Wallingford
*North Haven
*Fair Haven
*New Haven - State Street
*New Haven - Union Station


Cross New England Express - added more Stations - Electrified - Uses Push Pulls , Top speed 125mph
*Schenectady
*Rotterdam
*Roselleville
*Arbor Hill
*Albany - Rensselaer
*Chatham
*Pittsfield
*Westfield
*Wakefield Street
*West Springfield
*Springfield Union
* Indian Orchard
*Palmer
*Worcester
*Framingham
*Back Bay
*South Station


Central Corridor - Diesel , Uses DMUs , top speed 80mph
*Brattleboro
*Millers Falls
*Amherst
*Three Rivers
*Palmer
*Monson
*Stafford Springs
*Willimantic
*Norwich
*Mohegan
*New London


Greenfield / Fitchburg line - Converts to DMU's Top speed increased to 90mph
North Station
Porter SQ
*Alewife Brook Parkway
Belmont
Waverly
Waltham
Brandeis/Roberts
Kendal Green
Hastings
Silver Hill
Lincoln
Concord
West Concord
South Acton
Littleton/Route 495
Ayer
Shirley
North Leominster
Fitchburg
*West Wachusetts
*Gardner
*Athol
*Orange
*Greenfield
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  #2  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2012, 9:30 PM
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Rhode Island & Coastal Massachusetts Regional Rail

Commuter Rail

South County line
Providence Central
Olneyville
Elmwood
Cranston

Warwick - TF Green Airport
East Greenwich
Davisville

Wickford JCT
Kingston
Westerly


Quonset Branch

Providence Central
Olneyville
Elmwood
Cranston

Warwick - TF Green Airport
East Greenwich
Davisville

Quonset Ferry Terminal


Worcester - Woonsocket / Quonset line
Worcester Union
Millbury
Uxbridge
Woonsocket
Manville
Route 295 Park / Ride
Cumberland
Valley Falls
Pawtucket Central
Charles - Smithfield Ave

Providence Central
Olneyville
Elmwood
Cranston

Warwick - TF Green Airport
East Greenwich
Davisville

Quonset Ferry Terminal


Providence line
South Station
Back Bay Station
Ruggles
Westwood / Route 128
Canton JCT
Sharon
Mansfield
Attleboro
South Attleboro
Pawtucket
Smithfield Ave - Charles

Providence Central


Newport Xpress
Providence Central
Smithfield Ave - Charles
Pawtucket Central
Taunton
Fall River Depot
Battleship Cove
Tiverton
Middletown
Coddington Cove
United States Naval War College
Newport Waterfront


New Bedford line
South Station
Back Bay Station
Ruggles
Westwood / Route 128
Canton JCT
Canton Center
Sloughton
North Easton
Easton
Raynham Park
Taunton
East Taunton
Kings Highway
Whales Tooth / Downtown New Bedford


Newport / Fall River line
South Station
Back Bay Station
Ruggles
Westwood / Route 128
Canton JCT
Canton Center
Sloughton
North Easton
Easton
Raynham Park
Taunton
East Taunton
Freetown
Fall River Depot
Battleship Cove
Tiverton
Middletown
United States Naval War College
Newport Waterfront


Middlebough / Cape Cod line
South Station
JFK/UMASS
Quincy Center
Braintree
Holbrook/Randolph
Montello
Brockton
Campello
Bridgewater
Middleborough
Wareham
Buzzards Bay
Sandwich
Barnstable
Hyannis


Cape Cod Xpress
Providence Central
Smithfield Ave - Charles
Pawtucket Central
Taunton
Middleborough
Wareham
Buzzards Bay
Sandwich
Barnstable
Hyannis
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  #3  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2012, 9:58 PM
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Eastern Massachusetts & Southern Hampshire


South Station

Fairmount line
South Station
New Market
Uphams Corner
Four Corners / Geneva
Talbot Ave

Morton Street
Blue Hill Ave
Fairmount
Readville

Providence line
South Station
Back Bay Station
Ruggles
Westwood / Route 128
Canton JCT
Sharon
Mansfield
Attleboro
South Attleboro
Pawtucket
Providence Central
TF Green Airport


Needham Line
South Station
Back Bay
Ruggles
Forest Hills
Roslindale Village
Bellevue
Highland
West Roxbury
Hershey
Needham JCT
Dover
Medfield
Millis


Worcester Line
South Station
Back Bay
Yawkey
New Brighton Landing
Newtonville
West Newton
Auburndale
Wellesley Farms
Wellesley Hills
Wellesley Square
Natick
West Natick
Framingham
Ashland
Southborough
Westborough
Grafton
Worcester

Greenbush line
South Station
JFK / UMass
Quincy Center
Weymouth Landing/East Braintree
East Weymouth
West Hingham
Nantasket Junction
Cohasset
North Scituate
Greenbush

Milford / Franklin line
South Station
Back Bay
Ruggles
Hyde Park
Readville
Endicott
Dedham Corporate Center
Islington
Norwood Depot
Norwood Central
Windsor Gardens
Plimptonville
Walpole
Norfolk
Franklin/Dean College
Forge Park/495
Bellingham
Milford


Old Colony lines

Kingston line
South Station
JFK/UMASS
Quincy Center
Braintree
South Weymouth
Abington
Whitman
Hanson
Halifax
Kingston / Route 3


Plymouth branch
South Station
JFK/UMASS
Quincy Center
Braintree
South Weymouth
Abington
Whitman
Hanson
Halifax
Plymouth
Plymouth Central

Middlebough / Cape Cod line
South Station
JFK/UMASS
Quincy Center
Braintree
Holbrook/Randolph
Montello
Brockton
Campello
Bridgewater
Middleborough
Wareham
Buzzards Bay
Sandwich
Barnstable
Hyannis


North Station

Rockport Line
North Station
Chelsea
River Works
Lynn
Swampscott
Salem
Beverly Depot
Montserrat
Prides Crossing
Beverly Farms
Manchester
West Gloucester
Gloucester
Rockport

Portsmouth / Newburyport line
North Station
Chelsea
River Works
Lynn
Swampscott
Salem
Beverly Depot
North Beverly
Hamilton/Wenham
Ipswich
Rowley
Newburyport
Salisbury
Hampton
Portsmouth



Haverhill Line
North Station
Malden Center
Wyoming Hill
Melrose/Cedar Park
Melrose Highlands
Greenwood
Wakefield
Reading
North Wilmington
Ballardvale
Andover
Lawrence
Bradford
Haverhill
Plaistow

Concord / Lowell line
North Station
West Medford
Wedgemere
Winchester Center
Mishawum
Anterson RTC
Wilmington
North Billerica
Lowell
North Chelmsford
Tyngsborough
Nashua
Merrimack
Manchester Airport
Manchester
Southern New Hampshire University
Hooksett
Concord



Greenfield / Fitchburg line
North Station
Porter SQ
Alewife Brook Parkway
Belmont
Waverly
Waltham
Brandeis/Roberts
Kendal Green
Hastings
Silver Hill
Lincoln
Concord
West Concord
South Acton
Littleton/Route 495
Ayer
Shirley
North Leominster
Fitchburg
West Wachusetts
Gardner
Athol
Orange
Greenfield
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  #4  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2012, 10:03 PM
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New Haven - Springfield Corridor or Knowledge Corridor

Quote:
Governor Dannel P. Malloy and the U.S. Department of Transportation today announced the release of $120.9 million in FRA funding to Connecticut to advance the New Haven-Hartford-Springfield (NHHS) Rail Program. The federal funding will be matched by $141.9 million in state funding. Enhanced intercity rail service is expected to start in 2016. This is the third of three FRA grants for the NHHS program, bringing the total federal funding to $190.9 million, which, combined with state funding of $174.7 million, makes a total investment of $365.6 million in this corridor. This phase of the project is expected to create or sustain about 9,000 jobs. The total project will create or sustain about 13,000 jobs.

“Investing in new mass transportation opportunities will undoubtedly improve congestion on our roadways, create new economic development opportunities and improve our resident’s overall quality of life. But perhaps most importantly, it will create jobs – roughly 13,000 of them for this project alone,” said Governor Malloy. “Achieving this milestone means we can complete the design and construction of new track, signal and communication systems, bridge and station infrastructure improvements between New Haven and Hartford and provide an economic boon for the region.”

The Governor also noted that the state’s considerable funding contribution underscores his commitment to high-speed rail in the corridor and the entire Northeast Corridor (NEC) between Boston and Washington, DC.

“Once completed, there will be 17 round trip trains traveling between New Haven and Springfield, Massachusetts each day,” said Deputy U.S. Transportation Secretary John Porcari. “The improvements in Connecticut will simplify routes for travelers throughout the Northeast Corridor, while building on President Obama’s vision of making rail attractive and competitive in the region.”

Connecticut Department of Transportation (DOT) Commissioner James P. Redeker said that the NHHS Rail Program “will increase the safety, frequency and speed of intercity service along the 62-mile corridor and enhance regional rail connections,” noting that the number of trains will increase from the current 12 per day today to 34 by 2016. Trains will reach speeds of up to 110 mph and travel times will be reduced significantly, making rail travel far more attractive and competitive in the corridor.

The Commissioner said that the first phase of construction – the installation of underground communication cable – will begin later this month. By the end of 2016, with the funds that are now in place, the entire corridor between Hartford and New Haven will be double-tracked. Redeker also said that a key component of the investments is installation of state-of-the-art grade crossing protection to ensure safety along the entire corridor. Station improvements will include the addition of high-level platforms at some existing stations and new stations in Meriden and Wallingford.
http://www.norwalkplus.com/nwk/infor...np_18070.shtml
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  #5  
Old Posted Oct 7, 2012, 1:04 AM
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Fairmount line upgrade , 4 New stations in Southeast Boston...

Newmarket - Opens in : June 2013





Four Corners/Geneva -- Opens in : April 2013




Talbot Avenue , Opens in : October 2012




Blue Hill Avenue , Opens in : 2015



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairmount_Line

Last edited by Nexis4Jersey; Oct 7, 2012 at 1:46 AM.
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  #6  
Old Posted Nov 24, 2012, 12:55 AM
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Southern Massachusetts and Rhode Island Transit Ideas

https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msid...79966,3.348083

Southern Massachusetts
Providence line - 28,000 (2010) > 45,000 (2030)
Greenbush line - 5,600 (2010) > 8,800 (2030)
(Milford) / Franklin line - 13,000 (2010) > 17,200 (2030)
Needham line - 8,400 (2010) > 15,000 (2030)
Fairmount line - 2,200 (2010) > 21,700 (2030)
Old Colony lines - 20,000 (2010) > 48,000 (2030)
Worcester line - 19,000 (2010) > 35,000 (2030)
Stoughton / (South Coast network) - 3,600 (2010) > 62,000 (2030)
Millis Branch - 2,700 (2030)
Western Link - 8,600 (2030)
Inland Connector - 6,200 (2030)
New Bedford line - 15,800 (2030)
Fall River line - 25,700 (2030)
Woonsocket Branch - 3,100 (2030)

Rhode Island
Providence/Pawtucket Streetcars - 124,000 (2030)
Worcester / Woonsocket line - 12,900 (2030)
South County line - 4,400 (2012) > 35,400 (2030)
Fall River / Newport line - 5,800 (2030)

Hartford line - 17,000 (2030)
Bristol LRT - 15,000 (2030)
West Warwick LRT - 25,000 (2030)
I-195 Xpress Rail East - 45,000 (2030)
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  #7  
Old Posted Nov 24, 2012, 12:56 AM
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Providence line - Providence Central to South Station : Peak : 5-10 minutes : Reverse Peak : 15-20minutes : Offpeak : 25minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 30min

Greenbush line - Greenbush to South Station : Peak : 10-15 minutes : Reverse Peak : 30-45minutes & Offpeak : 45minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 60min

(Milford) / Franklin line - (Milford)Franklin to South Station : Peak : 5-15 minutes : Reverse Peak : 15minutes & Offpeak : 30minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 45min

Needham line - Needham to South Station : Peak : 10-15 minutes : Reverse Peak : 20-25minutes & Offpeak : 30minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 45min

Fairmount line - Readville to South Station : Peak : 5-10 minutes : Reverse Peak : 10-15minutes & Offpeak :20minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 30min

Old Colony lines - (Hyannis)Middleborough/Kingston&Plymouth to South Station : Peak : 10-15 minutes : Reverse Peak : 20minutes & Offpeak : 35minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 45min

Worcester line - Worcester Union to South Station : Peak : 5-10 minutes : Reverse Peak : 20minutes & Offpeak : 25minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 45min

Millis Branch - Millis to South Station : Peak : 10-15 minutes : Reverse Peak : 35minutes & Offpeak : 45minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 45min

Western Link - Providence Central to Hyannis : Peak : 5-10 minutes : Reverse Peak : 15minutes & Offpeak : 25minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 35-45min

Inland Connector - Mansfield to Framingham : Peak : 5-10 minutes : Reverse Peak : 15minutes & Offpeak : 25minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 35min

New Bedford line - New Bedford to South Station : Peak : 5-10 minutes : Reverse Peak : 15minutes & Offpeak : 25minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 45min

Newport / Fall River line - Newport/Fall River to South Station : Peak : 5-10 minutes : Reverse Peak : 20minutes & Offpeak : 25minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 35-45min

Woonsocket Branch - Woonsocket to South Station : Peak : 10-15 minutes : Reverse Peak : 25minutes & Offpeak : 45minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 60min

Worcester line / Woonsocket line - Worcester to Providence Central : Peak : 5-10 minutes : Reverse Peak : 25minutes & Offpeak : 35minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 45min

South County line - Westerly to Providence Central : Peak : 5-10 minutes : Reverse Peak : 15-20minutes & Offpeak : 25minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 30min

Inland New Northeast Corridor Local Rail - Hartford Union to Providence Central : Peak : 20 minutes : Reverse Peak : 25minutes & Offpeak : 30-45minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 45min

Providence Streetcars - Peak : 2-7 minutes : Reverse Peak : 10minutes & Offpeak : 15minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 15-25min

West Warwick Light Rail - Conventry to Kennedy Plaza : Peak : 5-10 minutes : Reverse Peak : 15minutes & Offpeak : 20minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 25min

Bristol Light Rail - Bristol to Kennedy Plaza : Peak : 5-10 minutes : Reverse Peak : 15minutes & Offpeak : 20minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 25min

I-195 Xpress Rail - Kennedy Plaza to Wareham : Peak : 5-10 minutes : Reverse Peak : 15minutes & Offpeak : 20minutes : Weekend & Holiday : 25min
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Old Posted Jan 16, 2013, 4:57 PM
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Quote:
Portland moves forward to research passenger train to Lewiston-Auburn




PORTLAND, Maine — City councilors Monday unanimously passed a resolution for renewed study of public transit to the Lewiston-Auburn area.

Their counterparts in Lewiston and Auburn may be getting on board with it, too.

The resolution directs city staff to continue research into the transit link, in collaboration with officials from Lewiston, Auburn, the Portland Area Comprehensive Transportation System and the Androscoggin Transportation Resource Center.

The state Department of Transportation has been looking at options including train service as a way to reduce traffic congestion north of Portland for several years, and released a preliminary feasibility study on the concept in 2011.

The study would seek funding from the Federal Transit Administration’s New Starts and Small Starts programs, which has recently broadened eligibility standards, according to the resolution.

“I think this is a great step forward,” said Tony Donovan, founder and president of the Maine Rail Transit Coalition. “I give it my unqualified support.”

The resolution also calls for Portland, Lewiston and Auburn to explore a range of common issues related to transportation.

“The municipalities of the Portland and the Lewiston-Auburn regions view this study as part of a broader collaboration where communities can assist each other in addressing commuting, employment and other sustainable practices that enhance the livability of all three communities,” the resolution said.
http://bangordailynews.com/2013/01/0...wiston-auburn/
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Old Posted Jan 16, 2013, 5:00 PM
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Quote:
State transportation plan includes $1.8B for SouthCoast rail

The Patrick administration's long-awaited comprehensive transportation plan includes a fully funded, $1.8 billion SouthCoast rail project, but the improvements will come at a steep cost to taxpayers.

The plan, announced today, outlines the need for additional funding of $1.02 billion a year for the next 10 years to address the state's current transportation needs and problems and set the course for future economic growth.

The Department of Transportation report said some of that money would come from system reforms and modernization, but “also acknowledges the need for additional revenue to meet its ambitious goals."

"Those recommendations include an increase in the gas tax, payroll tax, sales tax or income tax; a new green fee on vehicle registrations; a vehicle-miles-traveled tax; regular and modest fare, fee and toll increases; and new tolling mechanisms.”

In endorsing the plan, Gov. Deval Patrick said he would indicate his preferred means for raising the additional revenue in his State of the Commonwealth Address Wednesday and in his fiscal 2014 budget plan next week.

“What's plain as day is that we have to make choices,” Patrick said. “We can choose to invest in ourselves, to invest in a growth strategy that has been proven time and again to work, or we can choose to do nothing. But let us be clear: doing nothing is a choice, too. And that choice has consequences. It means longer commutes, cuts in services, larger fare and fee increases and a continuation of the self-defeating economics of cutting off large parts of our population from opportunity and growth.”

The proposed investment in SouthCoast is substantial. The $1.8 billion for commuter rail from New Bedford and Fall River to Boston is the largest single project in the plan and, the governor said, non-negotiable.

“The SouthCoast rail project is enormously important,” Patrick said in a phone interview after the presentation. “SouthCoast rail has to be part of the ultimate plan. There's not going to be a plan that has my signature on it that does not have SouthCoast rail in it.

“The SouthCoast has been economically cut off for a long, long time and now is the time to deal with that,” the governor said. “We've had some self-defeating economics in the commonwealth for a long time, starving certain regions of infrastructure investments in favor of one big project in downtown Boston. In the future we need to pay attention to the whole of the commonwealth.”
http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/...NEWS/130119946
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Old Posted Jan 16, 2013, 5:02 PM
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Quote:
Readying a NH commuter rail revival


(NECN: Peter Howe, Nashua, N.H.) - But for a short trial in 1981, it’s been 46 years since passenger trains trundled from this bustling city on the Massachusetts border down to Boston. But now, for the first time in decades, there is not just serious talk but potentially seed funding for restoring train service not just to Nashua, but up through Manchester to Concord.

With the endorsement of a key legislative committee earlier this week, a newly elected roster of Executive Council members backed by a new pro-rail governor appears poised to approve spending $1.9 million on a thorough study of potential ridership on a Boston-Lowell-Nashua-Manchester-Concord train service.

"It's important for the future of not only Nashua, but New Hampshire to have that connection," Brian McCarthy, president of the Nashua Board of Aldermen, said in an interview Friday. Most aldermen, Mayor Donnalee Lozeau, and many other city leaders in Nashua are wildly enthusiastic about bringing back rail access.

"Nashua is the only community of its size and its proximity to Boston not to have service to Boston by rail," McCarthy said. "If we were on the other side of the state line, we would have had it 30 years ago."

The state’s already identified a railside location at 25 Crown Street where it would like to develop a $6 million park-and-ride lot and new train station.

Nashua Chamber of Commerce president and CEO Chris Williams said, "We see rail as probably the biggest potential economic development tool for Nashua's future."

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority now operates frequent service from Boston to Lowell, and that line continues past Lowell through Chelmsford, Dunstable, and Tyngsborough to Nashua, Manchester and Concord, with a short gap between the coal-fired power plant in Bow and Concord where there is still a right-of-way. It’s estimated it would cost around $200 million to $300 million to rebuild the freight line for 79 m.p.h. operation that would make a Concord-to-Boston run around 90 minutes.

And there's already talk of building a bridge across the Merrimack River to add direct access to Manchester Airport.

"Using rail to get to reliever airports has become important in many other places around the country," McCarthy said.

Williams noted that current counts show about 1,000 vehicles with New Hampshire license plates every weekday at the Lowell and North Billerica MBTA commuter rail stops, indicating a solid base of Granite State residents who want rail access. Beyond that, he stresses this would be far more than a ride to Boston.

"We see a lot of back-and-forth commuting down to Massachusetts, but also back from Massachusetts towards New Hampshire where Massachusetts residents are taking jobs, very good jobs, up here in the Nashua area," Williams said.
http://www.necn.com/01/11/13/Readyin...9&feedID=11106
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  #11  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2013, 7:07 PM
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man, the north east is where it's at.
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  #12  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2013, 8:35 PM
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Quote:
MassDOT’s transportation plan includes $3.8 billion in rail projects


The long-term financing plan shows that the state needs $684 million to operate the same system as of today. The plan calls for $3.8 billion to invest in existing transit services.

The plan identifies a number of high-impact transportation projects across Massachusetts that, if built, will create thousands of jobs and spur economic development across the commonwealth. In all, the plan identifies a $1.02 billion average additional need each year.

"The plan released today is a stark, clear-eyed, non-partisan presentation of the facts," said Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick. "If we are serious about improving our transportation system for a generation, then we have to be willing to make the necessary investments. We must invest in transportation, not for the sake of transportation itself, but for the jobs and economic opportunity it creates."

The plan allows for targeted expansion projects across the state. These expansions focus on areas of the state where opportunity is constrained by substandard service or by lack of access.

Projects include:

• South Coast Rail ($1.8 billion) – Completion of the South Coast Rail Line with diesel-fueled commuter trains to connect Boston to Fall River and New Bedford. The project is expected to create 3,800 jobs and generate $500 million in new economic activity statewide annually.

• Green Line Extension ($674 million) – Extension of the current Green Line from relocated Lechmere station in Cambridge to College Avenue in Medford, fulfilling a commitment made during the construction of the Central Artery Project and unlocking new economic opportunity in the region.

• South Station Expansion ($850 million) – Design and construction, within 10 years, of an expanded South Station that will accommodate future passenger rail growth for the existing commuter rail system, South Coast rail, Amtrak, Worcester to Springfield rail and future high-speed service to Montreal.
http://www.rtands.com/index.php/trac...ml?channel=286
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  #13  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2013, 8:45 PM
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Quote:
Connecticut 2012: Looking Back on the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly


2012 was a year of firsts for Connecticut, with the state’s first bus rapid transit project breaking ground and the implementation of its first road diet. There were a few disappointing outcomes for pedestrian safety legislation, and the state and its municipalities have a long way to go before they have the multi-modal transportation systems they need, but overall, 2012 was a year of progress.

The Good:

CTfastrak - The bus rapid transit project between Hartford and New Britain broke ground in May and was officially named CTfastrak. This 9.4 mile BRT line will be a true rapid transit service, with its own exclusive right-of-way and headways of three to six minutes during peak travel hours. It also includes a five-mile trail for pedestrians and cyclists along the southern portion of the corridor. The project is expected to create thousands of construction jobs and stimulate economic development in areas surrounding the 11 CTfastrak stations.

New Haven-Hartford-Springfield line - CTfastrak isn’t the only major Connecticut transportation project that broke ground last year; construction also began on the New Haven-Hartford-Springfield line in the fall. The high speed rail project — which Tri-State has supported since 2009 — also cleared a major regulatory hurdle in 2012 as well. The NHHS project will bring dramatic improvements to the region’s rail infrastructure and will integrate seamlessly with CTfastrak, creating a robust transit network in central Connecticut.

Governor Malloy, smart growth champion - Governor Dan Malloy established himself as a champion for smart growth in 2011 and continued to lead on smart growth and transit-oriented development (TOD) in 2012. In October, news broke that Malloy is leading the charge to potentially relocate state agencies to downtown Hartford from suburban locations, a change that could save money for the state while also helping revitalize the city. In December he announced an inter-agency working group that will address TOD around new rail and BRT stations.

Bridgeport bike share program - The City of Bridgeport was awarded $1.6 million in federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) funding which will pay for, among other things, a bike share system that could be running by the summer. That a bike share program is coming to Bridgeport should surprise no one. The city has become a regional leader in sustainable transportation and development under Mayor Bill Finch and Office of Planning and Economic Development Director David Kooris.

First road diet on a state roadway - The Connecticut Department of Transportation (ConnDOT) announced its first-ever road diet in July, which is intended to improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists on a section of Burnside Avenue/Route 44 in East Hartford. ConnDOT will narrow a three-mile section of Burnside Avenue, removing one vehicular travel lane in each direction, leaving enough room for bike lanes, on-street parking and left turn lanes at some intersections. While this is the State’s first road diet, it certainly should not be the last.
http://blog.tstc.org/2013/01/09/conn...-and-the-ugly/
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  #14  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2013, 8:51 PM
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State commits to passenger rail through Middlebury by 2017


MIDDLEBURY — Vermont will proceed with sufficient rail improvements to re-establish passenger train traffic along its western corridor from Rutland through Middlebury to Burlington by 2017, and the state will proceed on that track regardless of the prospects for federal funding.

That was the message on Tuesday from Chris Cole, the Policy, Planning and Intermodal Development director for the Vermont Agency of Transportation, known as VTrans. Speaking at the Vermont Rail Action Network (VRAN) annual meeting held at Middlebury College’s Kirk Alumni Center, Cole also confirmed an impending agreement with the town of Middlebury to manage the replacement of two deteriorating railroad overpasses within its downtown. The replacement of those overpasses, on Main Street and Merchants Row, are a key component of an overall improvement plan to enable the western corridor rail line to accommodate Amtrak passenger rail and heavier freight loads.

The cost of upgrading the rail line from Rutland to Burlington has been placed at $35 million to $45 million, according to Cole, an amount he said will probably “have to be knocked off in chunks.”

“We will keep plugging away at it,” Cole said, acknowledging the uncertainty of federal funding. “A lot of the projects we do are state-funded projects only.”

Cole’s comments were received warmly by the veritable “who’s who” in Vermont railroad present at VRAN’s annual meeting, conspicuously held in Middlebury to underscore the membership’s collective support for the resurrection of passenger rail along the western part of the state.

Expansion of rail facilities and service continues to be a priority of Gov. Peter Shumlin and his administration, Cole said. He noted the population of the United States is likely to grow by 100 million by the year 2050. He said air transportation is not likely going to be able to keep up with the greater demand.

“For our mobility as a country and as a state, it is our governor’s belief — and it is the current president’s belief — that in order for our state and our country to succeed economically and to be competitive in the global marketplace, rail is the next significant investment in our country,” Cole said.

He outlined specific goals in Shumlin’s energy plan that call for quadrupling the number of Vermont-based passenger rail trips to 400,000 by 2030; and doubling the amount of freight tonnage transported in-state from 2011 levels by 2030. In order to do this, the administration is pledging to support high-speed rail throughout New England, which includes extending the Vermonter passenger rail service to Montreal and “developing service in western Vermont by linking Burlington, Rutland and Bennington with new, or additional connections to Albany, New York and New York City.”
http://www.addisonindependent.com/20...iddlebury-2017
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  #15  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 2:27 AM
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The 1.8 billion price tag suggests that they opted for the electrified option. Is this in fact the case, because recent articles states "diesel fueled" trains are to be used. Anybody know for sure?
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  #16  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 9:27 AM
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The 1.8 billion price tag suggests that they opted for the electrified option. Is this in fact the case, because recent articles states "diesel fueled" trains are to be used. Anybody know for sure?
From what i'm told it will be electric. It will also be Double Tracked for the most part and cut through sensitive wetlands which is why its so expensive. Theres also a side project by Amtrak to electrify the 3rd track along the Providence line and widen it to 4 tracks. Theres also the Separate Cape Codder Project planned , but probably lumped in aswell and the Rhode Island plans like the Newport Extension.
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Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 4:24 PM
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^Awesome. Good to know.
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  #18  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2013, 5:03 AM
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The central Providence part of your map is problematic. You can't have a rail line turn 90 degrees within Downcity, since the minimum curve radius for mainline rail would require widespread demolitions. It would only work if you're proposing to run a tram-train, operating in streetcar mode in Downcity.

It's actually really hard to connect the East Side Rail Tunnel to the existing tracks to the north and west of the city. When the elevated tracks serving Union Station were demolished and the station moved to the north, the connection to the tunnel was severed. It is also very hard to serve Providence Station from the tunnel, unless you make unconscionable compromises on curve radius. It might have to be put in the "too hard" basket for the next few decades.

If you want everything to connect, you have to move the tracks back, which means closing Providence Station, or downgrading it to a secondary station, and building an elevated station above either Kennedy Plaza (more central) or Memorial Boulevard (easier). Such a station would connect. The problem: els aren't popular, and to allow reasonable throughput the junction to the east of the station, with lines to the tunnel and toward Pawtucket and Woonsocket, would have to be grade-separated, increasing visual impact. The main saving grace is that the required demolitions are cheap, and the new construction would allow high enough curve radius that squeal would not be a problem.

See this map of options. Memorial requires losing Citizens Plaza, which was bought for $60 million in 2005; this is a significant fraction of the likely cost of building the viaducts in Downcity and digging a station at College Hill, but still just a fraction. Kennedy Plaza requires losing a small building housing three restaurants, but the construction costs and impacts in Downcity are likely much larger, and the station would be on a sharper curve.
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Old Posted Jan 30, 2013, 6:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Alon View Post
The central Providence part of your map is problematic. You can't have a rail line turn 90 degrees within Downcity, since the minimum curve radius for mainline rail would require widespread demolitions. It would only work if you're proposing to run a tram-train, operating in streetcar mode in Downcity.

It's actually really hard to connect the East Side Rail Tunnel to the existing tracks to the north and west of the city. When the elevated tracks serving Union Station were demolished and the station moved to the north, the connection to the tunnel was severed. It is also very hard to serve Providence Station from the tunnel, unless you make unconscionable compromises on curve radius. It might have to be put in the "too hard" basket for the next few decades.

If you want everything to connect, you have to move the tracks back, which means closing Providence Station, or downgrading it to a secondary station, and building an elevated station above either Kennedy Plaza (more central) or Memorial Boulevard (easier). Such a station would connect. The problem: els aren't popular, and to allow reasonable throughput the junction to the east of the station, with lines to the tunnel and toward Pawtucket and Woonsocket, would have to be grade-separated, increasing visual impact. The main saving grace is that the required demolitions are cheap, and the new construction would allow high enough curve radius that squeal would not be a problem.

See this map of options. Memorial requires losing Citizens Plaza, which was bought for $60 million in 2005; this is a significant fraction of the likely cost of building the viaducts in Downcity and digging a station at College Hill, but still just a fraction. Kennedy Plaza requires losing a small building housing three restaurants, but the construction costs and impacts in Downcity are likely much larger, and the station would be on a sharper curve.
Your right I threw out that line and replaced it with a Tram-Train network that reuses abandoned or lightly used Freight lines and Trails.
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  #20  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2013, 7:14 AM
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It's actually an interesting question where the mainline should go - through the tunnel or along the existing line. The tunnel has the advantage that it allows commuter trains to directly serve College Hill, which unlike Pawtucket has a fair number of reverse-commuters from Boston. The tunnel is also a faster intercity route, by I believe 30 seconds, since the sharp turns are all much closer to Providence. The existing line has the advantage that it's cheaper.
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