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  #40561  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2017, 10:43 PM
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HossC HossC is offline
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Originally Posted by odinthor View Post

It's still at 1112 Ocean Drive. I can't seem to get a good full view in the Googlemobile; but here's a bit:


gsv
Thanks, odinthor. I also failed to get a good "now" picture with GSV, so here's one I found online (enlarged slightly). I never guessed that the lower panels were garage doors - it's so obvious now.


www.britishrebroker.com
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  #40562  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2017, 11:14 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post
That guy's actually at the Grand Avenue end of the Biltmore's VIP ramp. There's matching lanterns at either end:

gsv



...and Brad Pitt crossed this same spot in "Se7en" (1995):

itsfilmedthere



.

Last edited by tovangar2; Mar 15, 2017 at 4:02 AM.
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  #40563  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2017, 11:23 PM
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Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post

Free Ice Cream at the Pay'n Takit.

Trying to locate the address of this Pay'n Takit store. Source indicates it dates from '32. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...ll170/id/49642 Many of the kids are without shoes. Could be a sign of the Depression or common to kids everywhere.

There are actually quite a few Pay'n Takit stores. GW mentions it early in this thread as being adjacent to the Western Auto at Hauser and Wilshire http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=6844 but I am confident that store is not the same as the one below. It is possible that the pictured store was in Long Beach or per the '36CD, one of three LA locations: 5567 N Figueroa; 4709 S Western Ave or 4953 York Blvd. None of these locations seem to apply. The main office was at 1925 E Vernon Ave.

The 1934 CD lists Pay'N Takit stores at 419 N Fairfax Avenue, 4905 S Figueroa Street, 2773 W Pico Boulevard, 2093 W Washington Boulevard and 4721 Whittier Boulevard. I couldn't find any mention in the contemporary Long Beach directories. I had a quick look at each location, but couldn't immediately match any of them. Maybe the large Bank of America roof sign in the background could be a clew. Most of their vintage roof signs were solid rectangles with the text on two lines.


USC Digital Library
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  #40564  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2017, 11:29 PM
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Originally Posted by HossC View Post
Thanks, odinthor. I also failed to get a good "now" picture with GSV, so here's one I found online (enlarged slightly). I never guessed that the lower panels were garage doors - it's so obvious now.


www.britishrebroker.com
I like the original "natural wood" look of the structure much better than the painted version; but I suppose there were preservation issues, with the frontage on the coastline and all. I note that there's much less car oil leakage showing on the surface of the parking lot these days!
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  #40565  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2017, 11:51 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
That guy's actually at the Grand Avenue end of the Biltmore's VIP ramp. There's matching lanterns at either end:

gsv



...and Brad Pitt stood in the same spot in "Se7en" (1995)



.


Of course you are correct T2. That's what I get for working on multiple topics at once. If you must know, Harry T and yours truly prefer the more discrete entrance on Olive!


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  #40566  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2017, 12:11 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post

If you must know, Harry T and yours truly prefer the more discrete entrance on Olive!
But the Olive end is notorious as the last spot Elizabeth Short was seen. (At least she may have gotten that far, having exited the then-front door of the Biltmore before turning south.)



Click, click, click, click, click.... there she goes:

gsv


Two Black Dahlia references from me on the same day. Huh.

Last edited by tovangar2; Mar 15, 2017 at 3:48 AM. Reason: add image
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  #40567  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2017, 1:06 AM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Originally Posted by HossC View Post
The 1934 CD lists Pay'N Takit stores at 419 N Fairfax Avenue, 4905 S Figueroa Street, 2773 W Pico Boulevard, 2093 W Washington Boulevard and 4721 Whittier Boulevard. I couldn't find any mention in the contemporary Long Beach directories. I had a quick look at each location, but couldn't immediately match any of them. Maybe the large Bank of America roof sign in the background could be a clew. Most of their vintage roof signs were solid rectangles with the text on two lines.


USC Digital Library




Thanks HossC for giving it the college try. The subject was by no means exhausted; however, it was easy to be sidetracked by the 419 Fairfax address, which as you know is now Canter's central. Although NLA'ers know the location's history as once the Esquire theater (occupancy cert issued March, 1937) most are probably unaware that the structure evidently began as a market in '31. So far as I can determine, there were only additions to the original structure and no demolition, although that may have been incorporated into "renovations or additions." Since so much of that area was devoted to dairy farming, Lucerne ice cream seemed a natural fit as did the kids on the horse.


Long Beach is a possible contender considering the following. This source states this is a Pay'n Takit on opening day in Long Beach, circa '39. http://thumbs1.picclick.com/d/w1600/...CALIFORNIA.jpg


The "1939" date mentioned above is probably erroneous. USC Digital's version of the image suggests a 1932 date and provides a location that is now a Freeway: 11493 Long Beach Blvd. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...ll170/id/38764


Here is 4721 Whittier Blvd (1931)
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...oll170/id/3364





Two at 329 N. Brand Ave., Glendale (1931)
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...ll170/id/15763



Inside




As your CD search makes clear, Pay'n Takit stores did not always remain at the same location for long or the CD's were subject to errors and omissions. Could have been growing pains and the then current economic climate. We've discussed Sam Selig of Safeway Store fame. Safeway merged with Skaggs and that included absorbing Pay'n Takit stores. http://www.spokesman.com/stories/201...-takit-stores/

For some added color here is a vintage store front said to be in Jerome AZ
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/143/4...49cf173c0e.jpg



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  #40568  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2017, 1:12 AM
riichkay riichkay is offline
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UCLA Library has posted a wonderful series of photos circa 1896-1900, taken by amateur photographer H.H. West, who built his house in Lincoln Heights. I don't believe we've seen these. I copied the captions from the library's blog:


Henry Hebard West (known as H. H. West) was an amateur photographer who documented his life in Los Angeles and his travels around California and across the United States from about 1895 until his death in 1958. The H. H. West Collection consists of the negatives of his photographs, along with accompanying negative sleeves, which West himself annotated. His annotations are invaluable, as West documented the who, what, where, when, and why for almost every single photograph in the collection, giving catalogers an excellent jumping-off point for creating detailed metadata.




In this time period, West lived at 240 South Griffin Avenue in the Lincoln Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles with his parents, brothers (Guy, Wayne, and Wilson), and sister (Nella). West’s father, George, who was a contractor and architect, built the home around 1896. Here it is, still under construction and with a West family relative standing on the roof:




Once it was finished, the house was a frequent backdrop for West’s photographs. He captured his family as they hosted dinner parties, relaxed on their front lawn, played in their backyard, socialized with neighbors, and reunited with relatives.



H. H. West and his siblings pose on their front porch with their cousin, William Mead, Los Angeles, about 1900




Wilhelmina West, Guy West, and H. H. Cooper sit around a table, Los Angeles, 1897




Wayne West and Wilson West sit in the library of the West's house, Los Angeles, about 1900




Dr. Bim Smith vaccinates Nella West while William Mead watches, Los Angeles, about 1900


West photographed some of the means of transportation available to Angelenos of the day, including streetcars, horse-drawn carriages, and bicycles. West’s brother, Guy, appears in two such images. Once, with a Los Angeles Railway car as it pulls away from its stop at the corner of Griffin Avenue and Main Street:



Guy West and his dog stand by a Los Angeles Railway car, Los Angeles, 1897




Horse-drawn carriage passes in front of the West's house, Los Angeles, about 1898




Men ride on a three-seat tandem bicycle, Los Angeles, 1897




Group of H. H. West's friends and family walk through Lincoln (Eastlake) Park, Los Angeles, 1899




Ben Tyler, Lena Weideman, Mary Dixon, Daisy Connor, and Mr. Weideman sit on the grass in Lincoln (Eastlake) Park, Los Angeles, about 1900


Of note among the images of local parks is this one of a man steering a bicycle boat in Hollenbeck Park:



Man steers a bicycle boat with passengers on the lake at Hollenbeck Park, Los Angeles, about 1898

According to the Los Angeles Times article, “Fatal Boat Ride: Will Rogers Meets His Death in Hollenbeck Lake,” [25 Sept. 1899: 9] a young man died after a bicycle boat capsized on Hollenbeck Lake. It is possible that the bicycle boat in question is the one in this image, as the newspaper article seems to indicate that there was only one boat of this kind in the park.


West worked for the Southern Pacific Railroad, and often photographed railroad depots, employees, and the sights surrounding train stations both in Los Angeles and on his travels.

This photograph of a fellow S.P.R.R. employee, J. E. Brown is fascinating in its depiction of office life at the turn of the century:



J. E. Brown in his office at the Southern Pacific Railroad Arcade Depot, Los Angeles, 1900


West took several photographs of “cribs” (buildings which were rented out exclusively for the transactional business of prostitution) on Alameda Street in Los Angeles. He wrote on the negative sleeve accompanying these images, “[b]oth sides of the street were lined with these cribs, and passengers on S.P.R.R. trains arriving in Los Angeles looked out of the cars on these scenes.”



Prostitute sits in the window of a crib on Alameda Street, Los Angeles, 1896


Outside of S.P.R.R.’s River Station, West photographed soldiers who were preparing to take the train up to San Francisco, possibly during the Spanish-American War:



Military troops walking by Southern Pacific Railroad's River Station, Los Angeles, 1898


With these early photographs as an entry point, the H. H. West Collection is both an important document of Los Angeles history and a rich portrait of the West family’s life. A deeper exploration of the collection will allow you to see both the city and the family grow and change over the course of more than sixty years.



H. H. West and Mertie Whitaker stand in the Whitaker's front yard, Los Angeles, about 1898




H. H. West poses with his wife, Mertie Whitaker West, and son, Los Angeles, 1941


Link: http://www.library.ucla.edu/taxonomy/term/840/node/1942
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  #40569  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2017, 1:12 AM
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Marlowe chases after Eileen Wade in THE LONG GOODBYE.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CU0lA1M1_3I

Shot around Wilshire and Westwood Blvd in Westwood Village where Robert Altman had his production offices at that time.

At some point you see a Ship's Restaurant which was once across Wilshire from the AVCO Theatres (now the Pix).

Music by Johnny Williams (better known today as JOHN Williams).

Westwood in the 70's and 80's was a big part of my life. It was where 20-somethings went on Friday and Saturday nights -- over a dozen movie screens within walking, not to mention restaurants and bars -- in those days, it was where you went.
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  #40570  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2017, 1:26 AM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Originally Posted by HossC View Post
A view down the corridor.



All from Getty Research Institute





The wood theme evokes your post here: http://www.skyscraperpage.com/forum/...ostcount=32400





So much wood also reminds me of the Westwood and Palm Springs Chart House restaurants, among others. I believe they too have been mentioned on NLA.




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  #40571  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2017, 1:38 AM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Westwood in the 70's and 80's was a big part of my life. It was where 20-somethings went on Friday and Saturday nights -- over a dozen movie screens within walking, not to mention restaurants and bars -- in those days, it was where you went.

Dillons, 1081 Gayley Avenue ca. 1976
https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/99/255...3894cb7d33.jpg https://www.flickr.com/photos/alan-l...7594230520736/
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  #40572  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2017, 3:54 AM
Earl Boebert Earl Boebert is offline
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Originally Posted by Tourmaline View Post
And caught a rare car in the wild, a Citroen DS.

Cheers,

Earl
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  #40573  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2017, 5:21 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Originally Posted by riichkay View Post
Henry Hebard West (known as H. H. West) was an amateur photographer who documented his life in Los Angeles and his travels around California and across the United States from about 1895 until his death in 1958.
I tried to look West up, but the references state he married someone else in 1902, between the time of the two pictures with Mertie. Maybe oldstuff will sort it out, I can't.
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  #40574  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2017, 6:06 AM
ScottyB ScottyB is offline
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Originally Posted by riichkay View Post
UCLA Library has posted a wonderful series of photos circa 1896-1900, taken by amateur photographer H.H. West, who built his house in Lincoln Heights. I don't believe we've seen these. I copied the captions from the library's blog:


Henry Hebard West (known as H. H. West) was an amateur photographer who documented his life in Los Angeles and his travels around California and across the United States from about 1895 until his death in 1958. The H. H. West Collection consists of the negatives of his photographs, along with accompanying negative sleeves, which West himself annotated. His annotations are invaluable, as West documented the who, what, where, when, and why for almost every single photograph in the collection, giving catalogers an excellent jumping-off point for creating detailed metadata.


Thanks riichkay! Amazing photos, can't wait to find time to investigate the collection.
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  #40575  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2017, 6:59 AM
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Charles Forman house @ 1015 W. Pico, 1882-1913

Charles Forman, known as the founder of Toluca Lake, moved from Virginia City, Nevada, to Los Angeles in 1882.
He brought his Virginia City home, built in 1875, with him:



July 25, 1882, Los Angeles Times @ ProQuest via LAPL


Here it is on the 1894 Sanborn Map on the north side of Pico, between Sentous and Georgia Streets (a site now
under the LA Convention Center). There's a square water tower behind the house, with a windmill on top, and a
large barn farther back:



ProQuest via LAPL


I made a screen shot of this page at the Islandora/UCLA site (it's often not available):



UCLA


Here is a closer view of that photo from the Huntington Digital Library (where it's currently unidentified;
it's undated other than c. 1890-1908, but it has to be a lot closer to 1908 than 1890):



489245 @ HDL


This is also unidentified, but it must be the west side of the house, with the water tower in back:



489246 @ HDL


And this should be the east side of the house, with the barn in back:



489247 @ HDL


This biography of Forman says that the house "stood in the midst of an orange grove, and was the scene of many
pleasant social gatherings." The bio also discusses moving the house.


Here is another currently unidentified photo of the Forman house, in the midst of that orange grove, c. 1890 (or
perhaps a bit earlier; the photographer moved to LA in 1885):



CA State Library (William Henry Fletcher Collection, "House, View 24 of 39")


The Formans moved to 1719 S. Flower Street in 1901. Their old home on Pico, alone on its block on the 1894 Sanborn
except for a single house on Sentous Street, had neighbors by 1906:



1906 Sanborn Map @ ProQuest via LAPL


1910 Baist Map; those streetcar tracks are pretty close to the house:



Historic Mapworks


Forman's biography mentions that the home was torn down in early 1913 for additional streetcar tracks. There's a
demo permit dated February 19, 1913, for a two-story frame house at 1035 W. Pico, which has to be the same house.
Streetcar tracks cover the site of the house on the 1914 Baist Map.


The June 16, 1889, Los Angeles Times mentioned one of the "many pleasant social gatherings" at the Forman
home on Pico. It seems like a lot of the big names in town were in attendance:




ProQuest via LAPL

Last edited by Flyingwedge; Mar 15, 2017 at 7:51 AM. Reason: specify early 1913
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  #40576  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2017, 11:03 AM
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MichaelRyerson MichaelRyerson is offline
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Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
I'm still stuck at W 4th and S Olive:


And ProphetM has the whole line-up from the front except for the elusive corner building (someone's running a laundry/tailors out of the space under the Mumford's flag-festooned porch):



If anyone has an image of that corner building, I'd love to see it.
.

Okay, this may be the best I've got...


Looking southeast from the Mira Hershey property at 4th Street and Grand Avenue, ca.1910


I believe we're looking southeast from the now-vacant property from which Almira Hershey's house was moved back in '06. The house in the lower foreground is on the NW corner of 4th and Olive Streets. Hence, I think we're on the elevated Hershey property which is destined to remain vacant basically until Bunker Hill is leveled, serving as little more than a parking lot. We have a nice, out-of-the-ordinary view of the entryway to the Fremont with the curved stairs which will also survive to the bitter end. At the lower left, the building with the essentially blank wall sporting only two vertical windows is the little Hotel Antlers on the NW corner of Clay and 4th Streets. The prominent back of the Wright and Callender Building (11 stories) is here on the left in the middle distance at 4th and Hill Streets and at the upper-center we can see the back of the Hotel Alexandria on the SW corner of 5th and Spring Streets. The Occidental Hotel is clearly visible due to the P.E. subway building being as yet un-built and next to it, on the left, we can see the itty-bitty Hotel Leroy which will give way to the coming of the enormous Hotel Clark. I believe the building with the profusion of signs and handbills (beyond the Fremont) is the side of the Los Angeles Pacific Railway building at 435 S. Hill Street.

ebay
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  #40577  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2017, 3:21 PM
Ed Workman Ed Workman is offline
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Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post
Okay, this may be the best I've got...


Looking southeast from the Mira Hershey property at 4th Street and Grand Avenue, ca.1910


I believe we're looking southeast from the now-vacant property from which Almira Hershey's house was moved back in '06. The house in the lower foreground is on the NW corner of 4th and Olive Streets. Hence, I think we're on the elevated Hershey property which is destined to remain vacant basically until Bunker Hill is leveled, serving as little more than a parking lot. We have a nice, out-of-the-ordinary view of the entryway to the Fremont with the curved stairs which will also survive to the bitter end. At the lower left, the building with the essentially blank wall sporting only two vertical windows is the little Hotel Antlers on the NW corner of Clay and 4th Streets. The prominent back of the Wright and Callender Building (11 stories) is here on the left in the middle distance at 4th and Hill Streets and at the upper-center we can see the back of the Hotel Alexandria on the SW corner of 5th and Spring Streets. The Occidental Hotel is clearly visible due to the P.E. subway building being as yet un-built and next to it, on the left, we can see the itty-bitty Hotel Leroy which will give way to the coming of the enormous Hotel Clark. I believe the building with the profusion of signs and handbills (beyond the Fremont) is the side of the Los Angeles Pacific Railway building at 435 S. Hill Street.

ebay
I believe you are correct as to direction of view, but that puts the LAP terminus and the Hill ST stations and the site of the Subway Terminal out of the view, to the right, due south and southwest
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  #40578  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2017, 3:23 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Originally Posted by riichkay View Post
Most interesting.

My attention was drawn to the wiring from the light fixture to the table lamp, and the rug (or similar) seemingly out of place under the table. Was it covering something (dead cat), or perhaps it was a foot or lap warmer. The curtains may have been the purely decorative, or may have been room dividers for privacy or dust reduction. But with gas or other forms of flame lighting - - yikes. Is there a fire under the mantle or just an exposure issue?



Are we to assume Mr. Rogers did not swim or the boat pinned him under water? I thought Lake Hollenbeck was standing depth. Being fully clothed in water absorbent materials probably did not add to Will's buoyancy.



Family goldfish?




Couple of others from the West Collection.


Wearing worsted wool to the beach seems like fun, but not for the person tasked with removing all of the sand. "Who cloged the zanja? Maybe it deterred moths.


Santa Monica - 1895


Minimized danger from sunburn.




The West Collection contains almost 2000 images. Maybe it is beyond my capabilities but except for a few select images - I am only able to view them in a small format.

Example: 165 South Harvard Blvd. about 1916. 1. Ambrose Cline in the tub http://digital2.library.ucla.edu/dlc...8_1854_003.jpg

Last edited by Tourmaline; Mar 15, 2017 at 5:38 PM.
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  #40579  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2017, 4:17 PM
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HossC HossC is offline
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

Star Map 'mystery' location #2


https://www.theguardian.com/film/201...ollywood#img-3

Anyone recognize this spot?
Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post

I don't know where it is, but isn't that a Richfield station design marked "Shell" here? Massive neo-classical building in the background.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tourmaline View Post

A possible clue/clew is the fact that the light colored barn like structure to the right reads "Hollywood La Brea . . ."
It took me a while to confirm it, but this is indeed Hollywood Boulevard at La Brea Avenue - hence the wording on the barn. The 1956 CD lists Buds' Sightseeing Tours & Limousine Service at 7091 Hollywood Boulevard, with Jim Fuqua's Shell Service across El Cerrito Place at 7095 Hollywood Boulevard. The "massive neo-classical building in the background" is the old Fifth Church of Christ, Scientist building at 7107 Hollywood Boulevard. The view below is from 1952.


Historic Aerials

Here's a better view of the church. According to the caption, it was re-designed by Howard Elwell in 1959 to create the current building.


LAPL

More recently, 7107 was known as the Mosaic Church. Joe Vogel mentioned that the church was on an endangered list in post #20174. You can read a 2015 LAT article about the site's possible redevelopment here.
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  #40580  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2017, 4:47 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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I going to need help with today's Julius Shulman post. It's "Job 5412: Marshall Lewis, Franciscan Development Company Building (Manhattan Beach, Calif.), 1976". The full set includes a couple of other angles in color, and a similar range of images in black & white.

Does anyone know if this 41-year-old building is still standing?
_________________________________________________________________
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Originally Posted by odinthor View Post
It's still at 1112 Ocean Drive. I can't seem to get a good full view in the Googlemobile; but here's a bit:


gsv
_________________________________________________________________

I love the reflection of the coastline in the window. At first, I thought that was a dog with it's legs up on the glass peering out of said window.
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