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  #581  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2017, 3:19 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Originally Posted by terrynorthend View Post
I've been racking my brain on that one too. Ziobrop says the article is from 86. I worked at Delta Barrington in '89, (not sure when it was built) but it was definitely not new at that time. I also feel like I remember the CIBC building being there for quite a time too. That's all the corners of Duke and Barrington.

EDIT: I see that 1986 is the date of the DA link, not the Herald article. This fire was clearly earlier than this then. Google tells me the CIBC bank went up in 77, still not sure about the Delta. Seems likely it was in the 70's or early 80's though based on the style.
The date on the photos of the burnt building was Dec. 19, 1974, and the date of the city council minutes (that fenwick posted) tendering for its demolition was Feb. 13, 1975, so I'd say the fires must have happened sometime in Nov-Dec. 1974.

Additionally, I searched for when Barrington Place/Delta Barrington were built and found that it opened in 1980 (from Crombie Reit's site: http://www.crombie.ca/PDF/factsheet_6.pdf), therefore it must have been built around '78-'79. As you mentioned, the CIBC building was built in 1977 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank_o...erce_(Halifax)).

So the building that was burnt on the corner of Duke and Barrington in 1974 would have been on one of those sites.

It's hard to find pics online of those buildings, and the best I've been able to come up with so far has been this one from 1973 on the Spacing Atlantic site:



http://spacing.ca/atlantic/2009/12/0...scotia-square/

Here's one that just shows part of one of the buildings on May 27, 1969, from the Municipal Archives site.



search: Scotia Square Construction

I also ran across a little info on the construction of Barrington Place, but it's not much: http://astint.on.ca/delta-hotel-halifax/

I'll post more if I find anything else.

Edit: Found another photo (from 1962) on the Municipal Archives, still not a great view of the buildings, though:

Last edited by OldDartmouthMark; Apr 16, 2017 at 3:42 PM.
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  #582  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2017, 9:15 PM
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Keith P. Keith P. is offline
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No idea that the Delta Barrington had over 200 hotel rooms. I would have guess half that many.
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  #583  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2017, 11:33 PM
terrynorthend terrynorthend is offline
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Cool! Thanks for the legwork Dartmouth Mark!

Keith, yes Delta Barrington is a surprisingly large hotel. The floorplates are huge, housing 50 or so rooms apiece.
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  #584  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 1:48 AM
fenwick16 fenwick16 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terrynorthend View Post
I've been racking my brain on that one too. Ziobrop says the article is from 86. I worked at Delta Barrington in '89, (not sure when it was built) but it was definitely not new at that time. I also feel like I remember the CIBC building being there for quite a time too. That's all the corners of Duke and Barrington.
I worked at Scotia Square for a couple of summers as a teenager and I remember that all of the Barrington Street buildings where the Delta is, were torn down by 1975 or 1976 (only the buildings on the Granville Street side remained). I am not sure how long it remained that way.

I remember looking down at the Delta site from the top of one of the buildings, and a permanent Scotia Square employee told me that Halifax Developments had originally proposed a 30 story tower for the site. At the time Halifax Developments was also thinking of tearing down the Granville Street buildings, fortunately they decided not to (with urging from heritage groups).
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  #585  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 12:21 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Originally Posted by terrynorthend View Post
Cool! Thanks for the legwork Dartmouth Mark!
No problem... it's a great excuse to try to learn more about the downtown!
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  #586  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 1:18 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fenwick16 View Post
I worked at Scotia Square for a couple of summers as a teenager and I remember that all of the Barrington Street buildings where the Delta is, were torn down by 1975 or 1976 (only the buildings on the Granville Street side remained). I am not sure how long it remained that way.

I remember looking down at the Delta site from the top of one of the buildings, and a permanent Scotia Square employee told me that Halifax Developments had originally proposed a 30 story tower for the site. At the time Halifax Developments was also thinking of tearing down the Granville Street buildings, fortunately they decided not to (with urging from heritage groups).
Thanks for posting your memories on this. Here are a couple of photos of the site after demolition had occurred that I had downloaded from the Halifax Municipal Archives website a few years ago. They were dated April 1978.





For interest's sake, here's a 'before' photo of the southeast corner of Barrington and Buckingham from the early 1960s:



On a side note, I would love to have seen the lighted sign in action. It looks like there would have been some animation of the beverage flowing from the bottle to the glass...
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  #587  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 2:42 PM
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I would love to see pics of the interior of the Buckingham Tavern but have never come across any. I just love the name and the interior signage. I agree, the sign would very likely have been animated although I have no memory of it. I do seem to recall the even larger but similar "Peppermint Lounge" sign down the street on Barrington also being animated.
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  #588  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 5:14 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Just found another view of The Buckingham Tavern in the background of a demolition photo from 1967 on the Municipal Archives site:



Source - search for "5216-5218 Buckingham St."

I haven't seen any pics of the inside of it either, but will be sure to post them if I do.

Along a similar line, though, is (curiously) a photo of the men's room at the Hollis Tavern from 1958...


Exterior:


Source - search for "10-116 Hollis St."

One thing I've noticed that all those old taverns have in common is structural glass - presumably to let light in but not allow the public to view the 'immoral' consumption of alcoholic beverages... Having read about the extremely restrictive liquor laws in Nova Scotia in the early-mid 20th century, this falls right in line.

On another topic, I'd love to see the resurgence of neon-type signage using the latest LED technology. One thing I've noticed about older city night photos is how much more bright and colourful the streetscapes were with that type of signage...
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  #589  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 7:05 PM
terrynorthend terrynorthend is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDartmouthMark View Post

For interest's sake, here's a 'before' photo of the southeast corner of Barrington and Buckingham from the early 1960s:


Neat photo! I wonder if that Barber Shop had any signage "troubles" with City Inspectors...lol
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  #590  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 8:52 PM
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No memory of the Hollis Tavern but from the address I think it was in the block across from The Maple and the Ralston Bldg, on the west side of the street.
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  #591  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 9:09 PM
RoshanMcG RoshanMcG is online now
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"The asphalt of Spring Garden Road peels away to reveal the cobblestone of an old city beneath."


Source
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  #592  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 10:29 PM
fenwick16 fenwick16 is offline
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Fascinating picture RoshanMcG. I am glad that I am not driving over those potholes though.
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  #593  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 12:53 AM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Originally Posted by RoshanMcG View Post
"The asphalt of Spring Garden Road peels away to reveal the cobblestone of an old city beneath."


Source
Neat pic!

Further down the street, I believe but...



https://novascotia.ca/archives/EastC...ves.asp?ID=192
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  #594  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 4:48 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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There was a news story about it on CTV yesterday:

Quote:
CTV Atlantic
Published Monday, April 17, 2017 7:55PM ADT

Some Halifax history is being unearthed in an unlikely place this spring, along one of the busiest roads in Atlantic Canada.

The new pothole season has revealed cobblestones and rails from the old Halifax trolley system.

“The cobblestones were pretty much a fixed image in that part of the town," says 82-year-old Ralph Henneberry.

Potholes along Spring Garden Road have revealed old cobblestones from bygone era.

Henneberry used to drive one of those electric trollies. He says they were packed during peak times, with their top speed reaching 45 km/h.

He says drivers used to race each other to pass time during the quiet evening shifts.

“We used to brag to one another, 'I had this one going 48,' and 'I had this one going to 51,'” says Henneberry.

Dartmouth historian Harry Chapman isn't particularly surprised by the recent discovery, but notes the new generation would require a certain degree of patience to live in those days.

“If the trolley thing came off the wires then the tram stopped, and the driver had to get off and put it back up on the wires again to get the electricity in and drive off again," says Chapman.

Though Henneberry’s trolley days are behind him, the memories remain close to his heart. Thumbing through photo albums is about the only time he'll allow himself to reminisce.

"You know, life was so much simpler then," Henneberry says.

He says the recent discovery is another reminder of the old days, which can sometimes be far closer than we think.

With files from CTV Atlantic’s Bruce Frisko.
http://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/potholes-...-era-1.3372461



Here's another photo next to the old Dominion store on Spring Garden, around the location of Park Lane today. This is from 1941.





https://novascotia.ca/archives/EastC...es.asp?ID=2153
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  #595  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 7:29 PM
JET JET is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fenwick16 View Post
I worked at Scotia Square for a couple of summers as a teenager and I remember that all of the Barrington Street buildings where the Delta is, were torn down by 1975 or 1976 (only the buildings on the Granville Street side remained). I am not sure how long it remained that way.

I remember looking down at the Delta site from the top of one of the buildings, and a permanent Scotia Square employee told me that Halifax Developments had originally proposed a 30 story tower for the site. At the time Halifax Developments was also thinking of tearing down the Granville Street buildings, fortunately they decided not to (with urging from heritage groups).
The Granville Street building were torn down, the facades on the West side of Granville were dismantled, the stones were numbered and then replaced when the 'new' building went up, a nice job for facadism.
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  #596  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 9:17 PM
fenwick16 fenwick16 is offline
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The Granville Street building were torn down, the facades on the West side of Granville were dismantled, the stones were numbered and then replaced when the 'new' building went up, a nice job for facadism.
Considering how run down the buildings were, preserving the facade while building a new structure behind it, was the only practical solution.

In this case I agree, it was a nice job for facadism.
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  #597  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 9:46 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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From the link posted earlier:

Quote:
Original plans to build the block-square, five-storey hotel and shopping mall without disturbing the Granville Street west facade had to be abandoned when the walls were determined to be unstable.

Halifax Developments Limited resolved to fulfill its commitment to retain the original appearance of this block of Granville Street. Services of an artisan mason were contracted.

The stones from the front of each building were removed individually, numbered, and carefully stored. The result of this care was to make this block of Granville Street once more the gem of the provincial capital’s architecture.
http://astint.on.ca/delta-hotel-halifax/

This was also covered in Stephen Archibald's most excellent blog "Noticed In Nova Scotia":

http://halifaxbloggers.ca/noticedinn...future-passed/

It's interesting to note that his pic from 1977 shows that The Trading Post had moved from the corner of Duke and Barrington (torn down to build Scotia Square) to Duke and Granville, which was then torn down and 'facaded' (if that's a word...) to build Barrington Place.

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  #598  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2017, 9:26 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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I know I've been beating the newly-uploaded Municipal Archives photo site to death lately, and I see no reason to stop now...

I was reading Ziobrop's excellent Built Halifax blog about the Canada Permanent Building lately (link below), and noticed some photos on the Municipal Archives site that fill in some of the blanks.

http://halifaxbloggers.ca/builthalif...nent-building/

Firstly, the extruded aluminum solar screen which existed on the Sackville Street side (at the Starbuck's) was removed at some point.

The drawing (from Built Halifax):


I don't remember seeing it in person (or at least paying attention to it), but I stumbled upon a couple of photos of sidewalk repair that shows what it looked like around the 1967-70 period:




Source - search for "Barrington St. [corner of Sackville St.]"

Here's a photo from the mid-1950s of the building that was located on that site (looks like it was the home of Maritime Life among others at the time):


As Ziobrop mentions in his blog, the previous Canada Permanent Trust headquarters were destroyed by fire, necessitating construction of a new building on the site. Here is the previous building post-fire (again from the Municipal Archives):





In case you were wondering what was at the Argyle Street side (where Durty Nelly's is now), just an empty lot with billboards:



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  #599  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2017, 10:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDartmouthMark View Post

I don't remember seeing it in person (or at least paying attention to it), but I stumbled upon a couple of photos of sidewalk repair that shows what it looked like around the 1967-70 period:
I remember that applique on the windows. I think it went away when Tim Horton's went in there.

I find it interesting that the Vogue Optical Building across the street apparently also had a much more interesting window treatment than it does now:



https://www.google.ca/maps/@44.64625...8i6656!6m1!1e1
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  #600  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2017, 10:26 PM
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You can see a lot of detailing on the Tramway Building that isn't present anymore. There was also some kind of addition or separate building next door that looked interesting.

The Tramway Building is, architecturally, pretty unique in Halifax. I hope it gets restored. Theoretically that's what should happen since it's more than a century old and is in the middle of a heritage district..
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