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Old Posted Aug 6, 2007, 8:31 PM
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The New Colorado Economy Thread

The old thread managed to corrupt itself somehow. I was able to fix it so that all the replies can be viewed, but I believe the corruption will continue every time responses roll over onto a new page. Therefore I’ve closed and archived the old thread, which is accessible HERE.

Please use this for future Colorado business & economy topics.

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  #2  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2007, 8:52 PM
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thats good....

...but what is the beast banana man is riding? Kind of looks like a llama and a slug mated.
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Old Posted Aug 6, 2007, 10:37 PM
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T.O.T.P., that may well have been the best way to write your 1000th post. Congrats!!!! I will celebrate with a beast of my own.
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Old Posted Aug 6, 2007, 10:47 PM
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Maybe the beast is the mascot for UC Santa Cruz? The Banana Slugs!

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Old Posted Aug 7, 2007, 3:07 AM
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not sure where to put this, so it goes here....

I-70 corridor meetings beginning
By PETER MARCUS - August 5, 2007
A panel of stakeholders interested in relieving congestion along the Interstate 70 west corridor will begin meetings this week to come up with a 50-year solution for the highway.

The Colorado Department of Transportation regional transportation director for the corridor said he is optimistic that the panel of stakeholders will have a final environmental impact study plan to present to the public within a year and a half. There currently exists a preliminary environmental impact study that planners are using as a starting point.

“We’re pretty clear that the solution to meet that demand has to be a multi-modal approach of both highway widening and some kind of elevated fixed guideway train or monorail,” said Jeff Kullman, region transportation director for CDOT.

The panel, comprised of community groups across the corridor, government representatives from Clear Creek and Summit counties, environmental advocacy groups and motor clubs, to name a few, are charged with developing a universal plan to alleviate congestion on the highway.

Costly congestion

The process was given a jump start in April when a report was released by a Littleton-based research group indicating that congestion along I-70 between Denver and Grand Junction costs taxpayers nearly $1 billion each year. The study said Colorado loses $839 million each year from congestion on the highway and focused on tourism, residents, businesses and government.

While there is a general consensus amongst stakeholders that the solution involves both highway widening and a public transit system, the debate surrounds how to go about implementing those solutions.

“The challenge is paving. How do we go about where to pave? That’s going to be the real crux of what happens during the collaborative process,” explained Kullman. “Do we build the highway first or the fixed guideway, or a combination thereof?”

The panel is also charged with looking into the future and analyzing population growth not only in the mountains, but also in the Denver metro area. The goal is to come up with a plan that goes beyond the original 20-year solution and instead develop a solution for 50 years worth of growth.

The corridor saw 1.2 million vehicles passing through the Eisenhower Tunnel in July, the equivalent of 40,000 vehicles per day, Kullman said. Traffic is up 6 percent on the corridor with 8 percent being truck traffic.

Difficult fix

Dealing, however, with 300 inches of snow per year and points that go as far up as 11,000 feet, Kullman said no matter what the solution, implementation is going to be difficult.

“I-70 is the most challenging highway in the State of Colorado and even beyond that because of extreme traffic volumes,” he said.

Meanwhile, improvements to two projects are expected to get started shortly, with planning to expand the “Twin Tunnels” just east of Idaho Springs beginning as soon as September or October, Kullman said.

CDOT is waiting for final approval to turn the “Twin Tunnels” into six lanes instead of the two that exist there now.

The other project that will get attention sooner than later is at Empire Junction on I-70 near where U.S. Highway 40 heads over the Berthoud Pass, Kullman said.

CDOT has already received permission to establish a preliminary site plan to determine how to use the space there to develop multi-modal transit options that involve both highway and trains.

Privatize the road

Some infrastructure analysts, including researchers with the conservative think tank The Independence Institute, have recommended that planners privatize the highway system with a toll system.

Dennis Polhill, senior fellow of public infrastructure for the Independence Institute, is calling for establishing a system similar to high-occupancy toll lanes that were installed along Interstate 25 from U.S. Highway 36 into downtown Denver.

The Express Lanes allow solo drivers to utilize lanes that were previously designated only for carpool vehicles. A toll, that varies based on time of day, is charged to solo drivers.

Polhill said if a similar system were established along the I-70 corridor from Denver to Grand Junction, travelers would plan their trips based around peak hours. Some people might not want to pay higher toll fees during peak hours and so they would delay their trip to avoid those fees.

Others might value time more than money and feel comfortable paying the higher tolls during peak hours, Polhill concluded.

Space problem

Kullman said the panel of stakeholders is not currently pursuing the toll lanes because it would take additional space that he said is limited by steep canyons and other mountain terrain.

“It would be a challenge. I’m not going to say that it’s not going to happen, but there’s definitely a space challenge,” he said, adding that such a system would be most practical at the Eisenhower Tunnel.

In the meantime, Kullman is pleased with the direction the planning process is headed in.

“I see a whole lot of activity and interest and cooperative spirit by everyone along the corridor,” he said. “I’m cautiously optimistic that all the things are in place and that we can get through this collaborative process.”

To become involved in the planning process for the I-70 mountain corridor, visit www.i70mtncorridor.com, or call 303-365-7041.
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  #6  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2007, 3:08 AM
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It's a Bunchie. You'd know that if you played CyberNations because it is the mascot of an alliance called Genmay. Look at their nifty flag:

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Old Posted Aug 11, 2007, 3:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Denver Bear View Post
not sure where to put this, so it goes here....

I-70 corridor meetings beginning
By PETER MARCUS - August 5, 2007
A panel of stakeholders interested in relieving congestion along the Interstate 70 west corridor will begin meetings this week to come up with a 50-year solution for the highway.

The Colorado Department of Transportation regional transportation director for the corridor said he is optimistic that the panel of stakeholders will have a final environmental impact study plan to present to the public within a year and a half. There currently exists a preliminary environmental impact study that planners are using as a starting point.

“We’re pretty clear that the solution to meet that demand has to be a multi-modal approach of both highway widening and some kind of elevated fixed guideway train or monorail,” said Jeff Kullman, region transportation director for CDOT.

The panel, comprised of community groups across the corridor, government representatives from Clear Creek and Summit counties, environmental advocacy groups and motor clubs, to name a few, are charged with developing a universal plan to alleviate congestion on the highway.

Costly congestion

The process was given a jump start in April when a report was released by a Littleton-based research group indicating that congestion along I-70 between Denver and Grand Junction costs taxpayers nearly $1 billion each year. The study said Colorado loses $839 million each year from congestion on the highway and focused on tourism, residents, businesses and government.

While there is a general consensus amongst stakeholders that the solution involves both highway widening and a public transit system, the debate surrounds how to go about implementing those solutions.

“The challenge is paving. How do we go about where to pave? That’s going to be the real crux of what happens during the collaborative process,” explained Kullman. “Do we build the highway first or the fixed guideway, or a combination thereof?”

The panel is also charged with looking into the future and analyzing population growth not only in the mountains, but also in the Denver metro area. The goal is to come up with a plan that goes beyond the original 20-year solution and instead develop a solution for 50 years worth of growth.

The corridor saw 1.2 million vehicles passing through the Eisenhower Tunnel in July, the equivalent of 40,000 vehicles per day, Kullman said. Traffic is up 6 percent on the corridor with 8 percent being truck traffic.

Difficult fix

Dealing, however, with 300 inches of snow per year and points that go as far up as 11,000 feet, Kullman said no matter what the solution, implementation is going to be difficult.

“I-70 is the most challenging highway in the State of Colorado and even beyond that because of extreme traffic volumes,” he said.

Meanwhile, improvements to two projects are expected to get started shortly, with planning to expand the “Twin Tunnels” just east of Idaho Springs beginning as soon as September or October, Kullman said.

CDOT is waiting for final approval to turn the “Twin Tunnels” into six lanes instead of the two that exist there now.

The other project that will get attention sooner than later is at Empire Junction on I-70 near where U.S. Highway 40 heads over the Berthoud Pass, Kullman said.

CDOT has already received permission to establish a preliminary site plan to determine how to use the space there to develop multi-modal transit options that involve both highway and trains.

Privatize the road

Some infrastructure analysts, including researchers with the conservative think tank The Independence Institute, have recommended that planners privatize the highway system with a toll system.

Dennis Polhill, senior fellow of public infrastructure for the Independence Institute, is calling for establishing a system similar to high-occupancy toll lanes that were installed along Interstate 25 from U.S. Highway 36 into downtown Denver.

The Express Lanes allow solo drivers to utilize lanes that were previously designated only for carpool vehicles. A toll, that varies based on time of day, is charged to solo drivers.

Polhill said if a similar system were established along the I-70 corridor from Denver to Grand Junction, travelers would plan their trips based around peak hours. Some people might not want to pay higher toll fees during peak hours and so they would delay their trip to avoid those fees.

Others might value time more than money and feel comfortable paying the higher tolls during peak hours, Polhill concluded.

Space problem

Kullman said the panel of stakeholders is not currently pursuing the toll lanes because it would take additional space that he said is limited by steep canyons and other mountain terrain.

“It would be a challenge. I’m not going to say that it’s not going to happen, but there’s definitely a space challenge,” he said, adding that such a system would be most practical at the Eisenhower Tunnel.

In the meantime, Kullman is pleased with the direction the planning process is headed in.

“I see a whole lot of activity and interest and cooperative spirit by everyone along the corridor,” he said. “I’m cautiously optimistic that all the things are in place and that we can get through this collaborative process.”

To become involved in the planning process for the I-70 mountain corridor, visit www.i70mtncorridor.com, or call 303-365-7041.

Hahaha I hate to say I told you so, but that is exactly what will happen, and I am almost 100% sure that the monorail will find it's way up near BlackHawk/Central City "along I-70 only" then continue all the way up to Vail!!!

DAMN I LOVE COLORADO/DENVER!!!!!
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  #8  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2007, 8:24 PM
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Colorado adds 45,000 jobs

The Denver Business Journal - 10:05 AM MDT Friday, August 17, 2007

Colorado added 45,000 jobs during the past year, according to preliminary numbers released Friday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The seasonally adjusted numbers show that between July 2006 and July 2007, Colorado's work force has increased to 2.32 million.

The state's unemployment rate fell to 3.8 percent from 4.4 percent during that same period. The U.S. unemployment rate last month was 4.6 percent.

But Colorado lost 200 jobs between June and July 2007, even as the portion of the civilian labor force made up by the unemployed dropped to 4.8 percent from 4.9 percent.

The numbers for July are preliminary.

Of the eight industry sectors tracked by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, five added jobs in Colorado between June and July. Two other sectors showed no growth and one lost jobs.

Construction; trade, transportation and utilities; professional and business services; education and health services; and leisure and hospitality all added jobs. Manufacturing and financial activities reported flat employment numbers. The government sector lost jobs.
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  #9  
Old Posted Aug 18, 2007, 3:10 AM
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you better believe the government sector lost jobs here. That HUGE building at Quebec and Alameda is almost empty now.....
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  #10  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2007, 11:21 PM
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Colorado a more popular place to consider

The Denver Business Journal - 2:39 PM MDT Monday, September 10, 2007

Colorado moved up two places in a listing of best states to live in the United States while Denver dropped two places in a list of the best cities.

A Harris Poll released Monday asked 2,694 adults nationwide where they would most like to live apart from their own state or city. The survey was conducted online in early August. Harris said easy access to the beach appeared to be a key factor in deciding which state people would choose to live in.

Colorado ranked No. 5, moving up from No. 7 in 2006. In the past, Colorado ranked as high as No. 2 in 1998 and again in 2000.

Denver fell two places, to No. 9, and tied with Los Angeles. Denver's highest ranking was No. 4, in 1997 and again in 2000.

Baby Boomers rated Colorado No. 5 for where they would most like to live, giving higher marks to Hawaii, Florida, California and North Carolina.
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  #11  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2007, 11:23 PM
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Colorado a more popular place to consider

The Denver Business Journal - 2:39 PM MDT Monday, September 10, 2007

Colorado moved up two places in a listing of best states to live in the United States while Denver dropped two places in a list of the best cities.

A Harris Poll released Monday asked 2,694 adults nationwide where they would most like to live apart from their own state or city. The survey was conducted online in early August. Harris said easy access to the beach appeared to be a key factor in deciding which state people would choose to live in.

Colorado ranked No. 5, moving up from No. 7 in 2006. In the past, Colorado ranked as high as No. 2 in 1998 and again in 2000.

Denver fell two places, to No. 9, and tied with Los Angeles. Denver's highest ranking was No. 4, in 1997 and again in 2000.

Baby Boomers rated Colorado No. 5 for where they would most like to live, giving higher marks to Hawaii, Florida, California and North Carolina.
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  #12  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2007, 11:26 PM
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Colorado a more popular place to consider

The Denver Business Journal - 2:39 PM MDT Monday, September 10, 2007

Colorado moved up two places in a listing of best states to live in the United States while Denver dropped two places in a list of the best cities.

A Harris Poll released Monday asked 2,694 adults nationwide where they would most like to live apart from their own state or city. The survey was conducted online in early August. Harris said easy access to the beach appeared to be a key factor in deciding which state people would choose to live in.

Colorado ranked No. 5, moving up from No. 7 in 2006. In the past, Colorado ranked as high as No. 2 in 1998 and again in 2000.

Denver fell two places, to No. 9, and tied with Los Angeles. Denver's highest ranking was No. 4, in 1997 and again in 2000.

Baby Boomers rated Colorado No. 5 for where they would most like to live, giving higher marks to Hawaii, Florida, California and North Carolina.
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  #13  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2007, 6:50 PM
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Colorado Becomes Largest Beer Producing State in the Nation
PR Newswire
Article Last Updated: 09/27/2007 11:27:09 AM MDT


Beer Industry Contributes $12.4 Billion Annually to State's Economy


DENVER, Sept. 27 /PRNewswire/ -- In 2006, the state of Colorado officially became the largest beer producing state in the country, according to newly released data from the Beer Institute. The Colorado brewing industry produced over 23.3 million barrels or 724.5 million gallons of beer. This makes the state tops in production, edging out second place California and other large states such as Texas and New York.


A recent study commissioned by the Beer Institute and the National Beer Wholesalers Association (NBWA) also found that the beer industry, made up of brewers, beer importers, beer distributors, brewer suppliers, and retailers, directly and indirectly contributes $12.4 billion annually to Colorado's economy. The industry's economic impact includes 67,918 jobs - paying $3 billion in wages - as well as $1.6 billion in federal, state, and local taxes.


"Colorado is tremendously important to the beer industry and produces a number of high quality brews enjoyed by adults around the country," said Jeff Becker, president of the Beer Institute. "With a strong beer culture and a rich brewing history, it's no surprise the state has become number one."


"The beer industry has been a positive force in our state for many years, providing a number of important economic benefits including good jobs and a steady source of revenue for our local communities," said United States Senator Ken Salazar. "We're extremely proud to be the nation's leader in beer production and share this great product with the rest of the country."


"As a state widely recognized around the country for our natural beauty, rich history, and extensive cultural attractions, we're pleased to now also be known as the beer brewing capitol of the United States," added Colorado Governor Bill Ritter. "Colorado breweries are also increasingly using and producing renewable energy, which is good for the industry, good for the environment, and good for developing more home-grown sources of energy."


Colorado is also home to other major industry trade groups such as the Brewers Association, based in Boulder, representing America's small brewers since 1942. The state also plays host to the annual "Great American Beer Festival" in Denver.


"In addition to housing many long established large brewers, Colorado is also leading the way among small, independent craft brewers," said Charlie Papazian, founder and president of the Brewers Association. "We invite beer lovers from every state to visit us and sample firsthand some of the many fine varieties of craft beer produced here."


The state's wholesalers also serve an important role delivering product to communities far and wide. "Colorado's beer distributors are local, independent family businesses that help provide a wide selection of fresh, quality beer to retailers ensuring consumers enjoy a great beer experience," added Steve Findley, president of the Colorado Beer Distributors Association.


The brewing industry also takes its role as good neighbor seriously in the towns and communities across the Rocky Mountain state, playing a significant role in promoting responsible consumption of its products and protecting and improving our natural environment. Brewers, importers, and independent beer distributors have invested hundreds of millions of dollars in communities across the country to develop and implement numerous programs to promote responsibility and help fight alcohol abuse. These efforts, along with those of parents, law enforcement, federal and state alcohol beverage regulators, educators, and other community groups, have all contributed to declines in illegal underage drinking and drunk driving over the past two decades, according to a variety of independent and government data.


Brewers and beer importers have also devoted great resources towards the development of energy and water conservation techniques, reusing byproducts and waste, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, establishing comprehensive recycling programs, and supporting environmental organizations around the country.


For more information about beer's economic impact in Colorado, please visit www.beerservesamerica.com or www.beerinstitute.org for a complete list of state production rankings.



The Beer Institute, established in 1986, is the national trade association for the brewing industry, representing both large and small brewers, as well as importers and industry suppliers. The Institute is committed to the development of sound public policy and to the values of civic duty and personal responsibility: www.beerinstitute.org.




SOURCE The Beer Institute
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  #14  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2007, 7:44 PM
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WTF Colorado has been the largest beer producer in the WORLD for years...
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  #15  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2007, 8:34 PM
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^No, obviously not.
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  #16  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2007, 9:23 PM
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I've always walked around with the knowledge that Colorado has been the union's largest beer producer...maybe there were descrepencies here and there? Switching of the lead? Regardless, it's fact now!!!
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  #17  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2007, 9:32 PM
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I had understood that Denver had the most microbreweries in the country and that per capita the state by far brewed the most beer. Now it's also in absolute quantity...
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Old Posted Sep 27, 2007, 9:39 PM
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From GlobeSt.com
Callahan JV Sells 70% Stake in Office Portfolio
By Brian K. Miller

DENVER-For $228 million, a partnership of Callahan Capital Partners and Morgan Stanley's Special Situations Fund III has sold a 70% equity interest in a 2.8-million-sf, five-building Downtown office portfolio here that it acquired from Equity Office in March for $770 million in cash and debt. A source with Callahan tells GlobeSt.com that the value of the portfolio remained unchanged for the syndication, which brought in two pension funds, Canada’s national pension fund and “a major US pension fund” whose identity was not immediately available.

Callahan Capital Partners did not reveal the percentage of the equity interest that it sold, but did say it generated gross proceeds of $228 million that it will use to pay down the acquisition debt on the property, which was provided by Morgan Stanley. Given that CPP Investment Board, which invests Canada’s national pension fund, says it paid $125 million for a 39% stake of the equity in the deal, then the total equity in the deal is approximately $321 million, or 42% of the total value of the portfolio, and the $228 million in gross proceeds represents a 70% equity stake.

The CPP Investment Board’s SVP of real estate investments Graeme Eadie says the investment helps the pension fund diversify its portfolio by increasing exposure to top tier US office properties. The other investor in the portfolio is a “major US pension fund” whose identity was not revealed by the parties involved and could not otherwise be obtained prior to publishing.

The portfolio includes Tabor Center, US Bank Tower, 1560 Broadway, 410 17th St. and Dominion Plaza. All but 1560 Broadway are located along 17th Street. The Tabor Center property includes land for an additional building. CB Richard Ellis has the leasing and property management assignments. Vacancy in the Downtown class A office market was approximately 5% at mid-year, according to Grubb & Ellis.
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  #19  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2007, 12:09 AM
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Wow, 5% for class A office space downtown?!!
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  #20  
Old Posted Sep 28, 2007, 4:47 AM
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All the more reason to get Tabor II going soon!
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