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  #721  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2018, 12:57 AM
drpgq drpgq is offline
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Originally Posted by TheRitsman View Post
Brad Clark is against LRT, but for infill. ?Que?
I kind of wonder if Clark is really for LRT, but just said he's against it to get elected. Maybe when the time comes for a vote, he can be sick or something.
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  #722  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2018, 1:45 AM
TheRitsman TheRitsman is offline
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Originally Posted by drpgq View Post
I kind of wonder if Clark is really for LRT, but just said he's against it to get elected. Maybe when the time comes for a vote, he can be sick or something.
I think he either:

1) Thought Vito was actually going to win (which I thought may happen too, so no hate there even though I wanted Fred to win)

2) Figured Ward 9 was going to vote for Vito, and he may as well jump on that train (badumtiss). He was right if this is what he guessed.

Both are very possible, and likely.
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  #723  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2018, 3:24 AM
thistleclub thistleclub is offline
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Growth in Hamilton: Drones and self-driving cars enter the sprawl-curbing conversation
(Hamilton Spectator, Teviah Moro, Nov 26 2018)

If it's possible to prepare Hamilton for flying cars, city planners will hear you out and not call you crazy.

"We talk about it in the 'world of what if,'" says Joanne Hickey-Evans, the city's manager of policy planning and zoning bylaw reform.

It's game as the city plans for a boom that's expected to increase Hamilton's population to 780,000 by 2041, up from its current 537,000.

City staffers recently hosted open houses to gather feedback on how to handle the influx. In addition to population, Hamilton must also meet provincial employment targets, which means a total of 350,000 jobs by 2041.

Housing types, parks and streets are the bread and butter of planning, but attention should also be paid to technology, Hickey-Evans said.

Take, for instance, the prospect of drone-to-door delivery, which Amazon has been testing in various countries.

"From a land-use planning perspective, the drone itself is not affected, but the employment is; you would have big distribution warehouses," Hickey-Evans said.

There has already been a surge in online retail, meaning more packages at door steps and warehouses, even without the flying robots.

Enter self-driving cars — with hovering ones also on the horizon — and questions about parking emerge.

"Because the car's picked you up, dropped you at the door, you're not driving your own car. Your parking standards decrease," Hickey-Evans said.

The city is updating its Growth Related Integrated Development Strategy (GRIDS) to 2041, with the last version contemplating up to 2031.

It turns out those drones and flying cars will have to negotiate much denser neighbourhoods if the city is to meet provincial targets.

"You'll have to change the built form," Hickey-Evans said. That means fewer detached homes and more townhouses and apartments.



Read it in full here.

Open house display panels can be found here.
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  #724  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2018, 4:30 AM
CaptainKirk CaptainKirk is offline
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Originally Posted by TheRitsman View Post
Brad Clark is against LRT, but for infill. ?Que?
He's flip flopped on L:RT.

Now that he's elected, let's see if he goes back to supporting it.
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  #725  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2018, 2:00 AM
king10 king10 is offline
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Hamilton has been nowhere close to hitting its places to grow targets from the 2006 report. We wont be hitting that 780k target in 2041. Those same projections based on the 2011 census had us at 584k in 2019 which we wont come close to reaching.
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  #726  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2018, 3:58 AM
LRTfan LRTfan is offline
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Originally Posted by king10 View Post
Hamilton has been nowhere close to hitting its places to grow targets from the 2006 report. We wont be hitting that 780k target in 2041. Those same projections based on the 2011 census had us at 584k in 2019 which we wont come close to reaching.
funny how the population doesn't grow when no new housing is built. Who knew.....
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  #727  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2018, 4:51 AM
thistleclub thistleclub is offline
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Ministry of Finance
Fall 2014 / Spring 2017 / Spring 2018

2011: 535,600 / 535,600 / 535,600
2016: 558,800 / 561,000 / 561,000
2021: 581,600 / 597,800 / 599,400
2026: 606,400 / 630,300 / 634,300
2031: 631,500 / 662,900 / 669,900
2036: 655,300 / 694,000 / 705,300
2041: 677,600 / 723,500 / 740,700


Hemson Consulting Ltd.
Nov 2012 / June 2013

2011: 540,000 / 540,000
2016: 568,000 / 568,000
2021: 601,000 / 601,000
2026: 640,000 / 640,000
2031: 683,000 / 683,000
2036: 733,000 / 732,000
2041: 778,000 / 776,000


Hamilton’s population is basically five years behind where it was envisioned… around 25K off the Ministry of Finance forecasts and 30K off the Hemson forecasts.

That translates as a 2041 population of 705K-745K, an increase equivalent to adding a city the size of Sudbury or Windsor to 2016 Hamilton.

The Elfrida scenario alone would basically be like dropping a city the size of Peterborough at the top of the Red Hill.
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Last edited by thistleclub; Nov 29, 2018 at 6:11 AM. Reason: Wonky Columns
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  #728  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2018, 5:32 AM
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  #729  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2018, 3:32 PM
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Home buyers move east in Hamilton and are turning to condos
(Hamilton Spectator, Mark McNeil, Nov 30 2018)

Hamilton's housing market has been going through a major retrofit.

Parts of the city that have tended in the past to be sluggish for sales — such as the east end and central areas — have become hot. Whereas popular areas in the southwest and the Mountain are simmering down.

And there is movement away from detached houses, with sales of new condo-apartments going through the roof.

That was the message from Anthony Passarelli, senior market analyst for CMHC, at the annual Hamilton-Burlington Economic Outlook Thursday, a gathering for local realtors to learn about housing market trends.

Major price hikes over the past decade, partly fuelled by Toronto buyers, have pushed Hamilton house prices to a point that increasing numbers of families are bidding down their dreams into more affordable alternatives.

And they are looking to neighbourhoods such as St. Clair, and Blakely in the south-central part of the city and Homeside, McQuesten, Parkview in the east.

Conversely, Passarelli said, sales underperformed in Mountain neighbourhoods Mountview, Westcliffe and Buchanan. Underperforming with prices were neighbourhoods between the brow and Stone Church Road and Upper James and Upper Gage.

Sections of west Hamilton did well when it came to sales, but not so much on price. Passarelli said it was because of high inventory relative to the number of sales. Dundas and Waterdown were about average whereas Ancaster underperformed when it came to price.

Read it in full here.
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  #730  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2018, 12:00 PM
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Growing population in Toronto and Hamilton need housing’s ‘missing middle,’ report says
(Toronto Star, Tess Kalinowski, Dec 11 2018)

The Greater Toronto and Hamilton Region could be short 165,600 homes by 2041 if it doesn’t rightsize its housing supply to give families more space and build places that will induce seniors to downsize. Failure to do so could skew the population to an older demographic and impede its prosperity by discouraging younger, skilled workers, says a new study...

The risk of not reaching the 7,200 homes a year the growth plan suggests are needed would equate to a $1.95-billion loss in GDP connected to housing construction, says the Canadian Centre for Economic Analysis (CANCEA).

Only 15 per cent of the region’s homes are the lowrise apartments and townhomes, a housing category known as the “missing middle,” that provide affordable alternatives to the polarized mix of highrises and single-detached houses that dominate Toronto’s housing mix, says the study prepared by CANCEA for the Residential and Civil Construction Alliance of Ontario (RCCAO).
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  #731  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2018, 3:45 AM
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GTA buyers behind 70 per cent house price increase in Hamilton area in past five years
(Hamilton Spectator, Mark MacNeil, Dec 17 2018)

Real estate prices in the Hamilton area have jumped by 70 per cent over the past five years largely because of the westward exodus of Greater Toronto Area buyers competing for a limited supply of homes, according to the Canadian Real Estate Association.

A new CREA report says the price increase in the Hamilton-Burlington market — with the average home costing $581,900 — is the fourth highest in Canada.

And the spike was even greater in Niagara Region, with a whopping 79 per cent rise over the same period, although the average cost of a home there — $393,500 — is almost $200,000 less than in Hamilton.

“Niagara was a little late to the party, but certainly they have experienced similar price growth to other markets in the Golden Horseshoe region,” said Greg Klump, CREA’s chief economist.

The price jumps in Hamilton-Burlington and Niagara Region are especially interesting when considering the GTA saw an increase of only 58.5 per cent over the same period and the national average was 43 per cent.


Read it in full here.
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  #732  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2018, 3:46 AM
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CREA Updates Resale Housing Market Forecast
(CREA, Dec 17 20180

The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) has updated its forecast for home sales activity via the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) Systems of Canadian real estate Boards and Associations in 2018 and 2019.

While economic and demographic fundamentals remain supportive for housing demand in many parts of the country, policy headwinds together with rising interest rates are limiting access to mortgage financing and negatively impacting homebuyer sentiment. At the same time, growth in home prices has slowed sharply in some regions. Indeed, home prices are declining in parts of the country where the supply of homes available for purchase is elevated relative to sales.

National home sales are projected to post a double-digit decline in 2018, falling to the lowest level in five years despite supportive population and job growth. In 2019, home sales activity and prices are expected to be held in check by recent policy changes from different levels of government, in addition to additional interest rate increases.

The national forecast has been revised lower since CREA’s September forecast as an anticipated rebound in sales in British Columbia has so far failed to materialize, the recovery in Ontario sales this summer has now run its course and sales activity in Alberta has edged lower. These developments were partially offset by stronger than expected sales activity in Quebec. National sales are now projected to decline by 11.2% to 458,200 units in 2018.

British Columbia and Ontario will account for the lion’s share of the national sales decline in 2018.


Read it in full here.


Canadian home sales will fall to 9-year low next year, CREA forecasts
(Canadian Press, Dec 17 2018)

National home sales are projected to fall to a near decade low in 2019, as rising interest rates and strict mortgage stress-test rules continue to put a damper on homebuyer sentiment, according to the Canadian Real Estate Association.

The group, which represents more than 125,000 realtors, is projecting that home sales across the country will decline to the lowest point in nine years but stay little changed from 2018, falling only by 0.5 per cent to 456,200 units.

CREA is projecting that the national average price for a home sold through its multiple-listing service system will rise 1.7 per cent to $496,800 in 2019.…

CREA attributed 2018's price drop to a 2.6 per cent year over year decline in Ontario as fewer higher-price homes were put up for sale in Toronto, especially during the spring market, which often sees a price surge.

In Toronto, the decline in average home prices this year is stark in contrast because the housing market in Canada's largest city had been "unusually strong" in 2017.

"As we look to 2019, the major battle lines seem fairly clearly drawn, with the market still supported by strong population growth on the one side, and challenging affordability (past price gains and rate rises) on the other," said Doug Porter, chief economist at BMO Economics in an analyst note.

"While we expect sales activity to stabilize next year... we nevertheless anticipate that prices will slow even further to gains likely below that of inflation."


read it in full here.
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Last edited by thistleclub; Dec 18, 2018 at 2:42 PM.
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  #733  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2018, 3:20 PM
LRTfan LRTfan is offline
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Originally Posted by thistleclub View Post
GTA buyers behind 70 per cent house price increase in Hamilton area in past five years
(Hamilton Spectator, Mark MacNeil, Dec 17 2018)

Real estate prices in the Hamilton area have jumped by 70 per cent over the past five years largely because of the westward exodus of Greater Toronto Area buyers competing for a limited supply of homes, according to the Canadian Real Estate Association.

A new CREA report says the price increase in the Hamilton-Burlington market — with the average home costing $581,900 — is the fourth highest in Canada.

And the spike was even greater in Niagara Region, with a whopping 79 per cent rise over the same period, although the average cost of a home there — $393,500 — is almost $200,000 less than in Hamilton.

“Niagara was a little late to the party, but certainly they have experienced similar price growth to other markets in the Golden Horseshoe region,” said Greg Klump, CREA’s chief economist.

The price jumps in Hamilton-Burlington and Niagara Region are especially interesting when considering the GTA saw an increase of only 58.5 per cent over the same period and the national average was 43 per cent.


Read it in full here.

Nothing worse than reading an entire article only to have the final sentence completely blow up the whole premise. What a waste of space.
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  #734  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2019, 3:53 PM
thistleclub thistleclub is offline
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Funding for 1,100 subsidized housing units in Hamilton goes unused
(Hamilton Spectator, Matthew Van Dongen, Jan 10 2019)

The money for nearly one-in-eight subsidized housing units required by law for Hamilton went unused last year, despite a growing affordable housing wait list of 5,500 people.

The conundrum has spurred the city to look at reallocating that unused housing subsidy cash - $2.1 million this year - to pay instead for "portable" rent supplements linked to specific tenants, rather than specific units.

Provincial housing legislation requires Hamilton to distribute subsidy cash for 8,403 rent-geared-to-income (RGI) units in the city. This is done via agreements with 27 housing providers, the largest being CityHousing Hamilton.

But a new report says those housing providers are "falling short of meeting RGI targets" by 1,100 units. That means nearly one-in-eight of those planned subsidized units were not available last year - or at least not as rent-geared-to-income housing.
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  #735  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2019, 11:56 PM
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  #736  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2019, 12:33 AM
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anactualalien anactualalien is offline
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Originally Posted by HamiltonForward View Post
I wasn't sure what thread to put this in, but this one seemed appropriate enough.

Planning and Economic Development Manager Jason Throne was on some sort of panel at Ryerson University espousing the 'great' effects of the height limit:



source

Any basic look at land economics in Hamilton says that no, speculation is indeed not being reduced let alone being completely removed. Just look at the likes of Malleum et al betting on small buildings in this city.

I just wish they'd stop pushing the damn thing with fake economics and false policy and be honest: this exists to please height NIMBYs.
I'm not the biggest fan of him but take a look at his extensive past work in this province sometime. I'd sooner defer to his expertise than someone who probably hasn't even graduated highschool yet. Maybe you'll go far in your planning/development career someday but implying that he's just full of shit is way off the mark and unfair.
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  #737  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2019, 1:10 AM
king10 king10 is offline
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Jason Thorne is well accomplished with a diverse track record. To say his views are based on fake economics and false policy is insulting and uncalled for. He didn’t build up his entire portfolio of work as a public planner to become GM of planning at a major city just so he could appease NIMBYs.
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  #738  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2019, 1:19 AM
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lachlanholmes lachlanholmes is offline
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Originally Posted by anactualalien View Post
I'm not the biggest fan of him but take a look at his extensive past work in this province sometime. I'd sooner defer to his expertise than someone who probably hasn't even graduated highschool yet. Maybe you'll go far in your planning/development career someday but implying that he's just full of shit is way off the mark and unfair.
Meh. Fair enough, I suppose.

I'm not really in the mood for another debate tonight so I got rid of my post.
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  #739  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2019, 5:22 PM
thistleclub thistleclub is offline
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The film Push shows how housing has become a commodity for the benefit of the wealthy
(Toronto Star, Christopher Hume, April 22 2019)

In cities around the world, housing is becoming a dwelling place for money rather than people.

Toronto is no exception; for buyers and renters finding somewhere to live here grows harder every day. As costs go through the roof, an increasing number of Torontonians, especially the young, find themselves forced out of town.

In London, U.K., whole neighbourhoods have been hollowed out as they are bought up by foreign investors and private equity firms. The new owners, who have little or no interest in letting their properties, would rather leave them empty than deal with the hassle of tenants and their endless demands for basic services.

As Swedish director Fredrik Gertten makes clear in his compelling documentary, Push, the financial sector has turned housing into a commodity, one that can be bought and sold dozens of times in the course of an hour. The notion, established by the United Nations, that housing is a basic human right now seems an antiquated nicety, a leftover from a more ambitious age. What remains now is the right of the rich to get richer.

“Finance is an extractive sector,” notes Dutch-American sociologist Saskia Sassen in one of several on-camera interviews. “It might as well be mining.” Finance, she points out, exists to squeeze every last drop of value out of any given asset.

“This is not at all about housing,” Sassen explains. “Buildings function as assets.” Gentrification, she points out, is the least of it. “It’s much deeper than that,” she argues. It’s more a wholesale appropriation of cities and the accompanying displacement of the poor and the middle classes to make way for the wealthy.

Sassen’s dire insights are echoed by economist, author and Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz, who also speaks on camera. As he said recently, since the 1980s, “…the income share of the top 0.1 per cent has more than quadrupled and that of the top 1 per cent has almost doubled, that of the bottom 90 per cent has declined. Wages at the bottom, adjusted for inflation, are about the same as they were some 60 years ago. Wealth is even less equally distributed, with just three Americans having as much as the bottom 50 per cent.”

….

As Gertten follows a special UN housing rapporteur on her research trips around the world, it becomes clear that similar scenarios are playing out in every corner of the planet. Globalized financial markets mean capital moves at the speed of an electrical impulse. From Berlin and Barcelona to Valparaiso and Toronto, corporate actors are turning cities into enclaves for the rich.

It doesn’t have to be this way. Berlin, for example, has started to buy land in vulnerable neighbourhoods. Vancouver has implemented a vacant home tax.

Across Canada, however, let alone Toronto, many governments would rather sell “surplus” land to developers than use it for affordable housing.

But, Stiglitz notes, “You can make money by destroying the world.”

That’s why change is so necessary and so hard.


Read it in full here.


Market Trivia: In 1989, the average housing sale price for the Hamilton CMA was $168,458. Eleven years later, it was $164,993.

Related: Opacity: Why Criminals Love Canadian Real Estate (And How To Fix It)
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Last edited by thistleclub; May 8, 2019 at 1:24 PM.
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  #740  
Old Posted May 1, 2019, 11:35 PM
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Tomorrow at 10:30 a.m., @SteveClarkPC is making an announcement about “Ontario’s housing crisis”. We have no further details but there is much talk this will be several changes to Planning Act and other legislation affecting development process and possibly rental. Stay tuned.
from Jennifer Pagliaro of The Star

I really really really hope they include bringing back the OMB tomorrow.
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