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  #701  
Old Posted May 1, 2018, 1:17 PM
thistleclub thistleclub is offline
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Doug Ford assured developers he plans to open up Greenbelt to housing development
(Toronto Star, Robert Benzie & Kristin Rushowy, Apr 30 2018)

Doug Ford has privately assured developers he will “open a big chunk” of protected land in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area to housing if the Progressive Conservatives win the June 7 election.

In a video recorded Feb. 12 and shared with the media Monday by the governing Liberals, Ford said the 800,000-hectare swath of environmentally sensitive and agricultural land known as the Greenbelt is “just farmer fields.”

“It’s right beside a community. We need to open that up and create a larger supply,” he said, noting that will lead to “price drops” in housing in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area.

“I’ve already talked to some of the biggest developers in the country, and, again, I wish I could say it’s my idea, but it was their idea as well,” the PC leader said in February.…

It was unclear how Ford could expand the Greenbelt if the preserved land is paved over for development.

Housing Minister Peter Milczyn pointed out, that as a city councillor when his late brother Rob Ford was mayor, the Tory leader wanted to redevelop Toronto’s port lands and build a massive Ferris wheel.

“It’s very disturbing how Doug makes policy and the implications and the repercussions of that policy, but I’ve seen Doug do this at city hall — whoever whispers a business idea into his … ear, that’s what he runs with,” said Milczyn, who served on council with Ford.

Environment Minister Chris Ballard, who disclosed the existence of the video to reporters at Queen’s Park, said it is proof that “Doug Ford has made secret promises to big developers.”

“Once elected premier, he will bulldoze a great swath of the Greenbelt and turn it into the largest condo farm this province has ever seen,” said Ballard, who represents Newmarket-Aurora.

“Ford’s promise to pave the Greenbelt, not only encourages sprawl, but it puts farmland, wild land and wetlands, including ravines and rivers currently protected, at risk of being encroached and even replaced by new suburban development,” he said.

NDP MPP Peter Tabuns (Toronto Danforth) said “the Greenbelt has to be defended if we’re going to have liveable cities in Ontario.”

“You have to curb sprawl. It doesn’t strike me as a practical suggestion. It sounds like something that a land speculator would be very happy with,” said Tabuns.


Read it in full here.
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  #702  
Old Posted May 1, 2018, 2:01 PM
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https://twitter.com/samoosterhoff/st...57044055773184

Quote:
Sam Oosterhoff: To be clear: we believe in protecting the Greenbelt. Anything we look at to allow for much needed housing development, we will do in a measured and sustainable way: we will add the equivalent land to the Greenbelt. That means there will not be an inch less of protected land.
A lot of responses asking where this "equivalent land" will come from.
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  #703  
Old Posted May 1, 2018, 8:48 PM
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No thanks to opening up the greenbelt to development. If there is equivalent land as Oosterhoff says then just develop on that and keep the greenbelt as is. Although I suspect his equivalent land comment was just damage control and not an actual policy they're running on.
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  #704  
Old Posted May 1, 2018, 8:54 PM
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You can see why he ditched the media bus.

Under fire from Wynne and Horwath, Ford retreats from plan to develop Greenbelt
(Toronto Star, Robert Benzie, May 1 2018)

Doug Ford has made a rapid retreat from his controversial scheme to open up the Greenbelt’s protected land to housing development.

The Progressive Conservative leader backed down one day after it emerged he had privately assured property developers he would “open a big chunk” of the 800,000-hectare swath of environmentally sensitive land around the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area if the Tories win the June 7 election.

“The people have spoken — we won’t touch the Greenbelt. Very simple. That’s it, the people have spoken. I’m going to listen to them, they don’t want me to touch the Greenbelt. We won’t touch the Greenbelt. Simple as that,” Ford said Tuesday afternoon.

“There have been a lot of voices saying that they don’t want to touch the Greenbelt. I govern through the people; I don’t govern through government.”



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  #705  
Old Posted May 2, 2018, 2:20 AM
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Ford... more of a Pinto than a Mustang. Definitely no Fusion, though he's trying to seem like he's a Flex.
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  #706  
Old Posted May 2, 2018, 6:48 PM
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Originally Posted by ScreamingViking View Post
Ford... more of a Pinto than a Mustang. Definitely no Fusion, though he's trying to seem like he's a Flex.
Ford is going to discontinue the Fusion. Hopefully Rob is discontinued too.
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  #707  
Old Posted May 23, 2018, 1:35 PM
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Rental Crisis: It costs $18 an hour to afford average Hamilton apartment
(Hamilton Spectator, Teviah Moro, May 23 2018)

It takes at least $18 an hour to afford an average apartment in Hamilton, putting the city in league with others in the province where rent continues to outpace incomes.

Nearly half of Ontario tenants earn less than $40,000 a year, and three out of four of those households pay "unaffordable rents," the Advocacy Centre for Tenants Ontario (ACTO) says in a new report.

Affordability is based on the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation's benchmark: shelter costs are less than 30 per cent of pre-tax household income.

The ACTO report, called "Where Will We Live? Ontario's Affordable Rental Housing Crisis," is released as provincial leaders jockey for support ahead of the June 7 election.

"We wanted to remind voters we are facing a crisis and to remind politicians they have a responsibility to make sure the crisis doesn't get any worse," Kenneth Hale, ACTO's legal services director, said Tuesday.

The report says rising rents are forcing tenants to sacrifice basic necessities, displacing them from their communities and driving them to homelessness.

Arguing "the status-quo is no longer an option," it makes five recommendations:

•Provincial matching of federal National Housing Strategy funds;

•More purpose-built housing with "deep affordability" meaning rent is no more than 30 per cent of income;

•Preservation of existing affordable units by reducing "financial incentives for landlords to push out sitting tenants";

•Recognition of the right to housing in law.

Based on 2016 census data, ACTO found 45.4 per cent of renter households in Hamilton pay unaffordable rates. (Factoring in Grimsby and Burlington, which are part of the census metropolitan area, it's 45.2 per cent.)

The average monthly shelter cost in Hamilton was $947 in 2016.

Someone earning $14 an hour, the current minimum wage, would have to work 52 hours a week to afford that, the report says.


Read it in full here.


Courtesy the aforementioned ACTO report, Hourly Wage Needed for Average Rent to Be Affordable:

Vaughan: $31/hr
Mississauga: $25/hr
Toronto: $24/hr
Barrie: $23/hr
Ottawa: $22/hr
Oshawa: $21/hr
Guelph: $20/hr
Kingston: $20/hr
Kitchener: $20/hr
Hamilton: $19/hr
London: $19/hr
Peterborough: $19/hr
Greater Sudbury: $17/hr
Thunder Bay: $16/hr
Windsor: $15/hr


So Hamilton fares better than most of its peers. Although the data is somewhat opaque in that the rental stock universe may include 3+ bedroom units, which is not something that a minimum wage earner would typically expect to be an affordable option.

The tension is also lopsided, since more than a third of the rental stock in Hamilton is located in what have historically been the wards with the lowest household income, Wards 2 & 3. As of 2011, according to the most recent Ward 2 Profile, 76% of Ward 2 residents rented; the Ward 3 Profile from the same year found that 48% rented. (Those profiles noted affordability as well. As of 2011, 48% of Ward 2 households and 51% of Ward 3 households were spending 30% or more of household total income on shelter costs, compared to a city-wide average of 43%.)
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Last edited by thistleclub; May 24, 2018 at 1:00 AM.
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  #708  
Old Posted May 23, 2018, 2:23 PM
LRTfan LRTfan is offline
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Hey I have a solution...let's turn down dozens of mid/high-rise rental proposals city-wide!! That'll surely help things out! NIMBYs FTW!
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  #709  
Old Posted May 23, 2018, 6:32 PM
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The problem in almost everyone of these cities is that a lot the older affordable buildings have been bought up by large property management companies whose entire business plan is to get cheap units and increase the rent.
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  #710  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2018, 9:51 PM
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Hamilton seeing “notable traction” in new condo sales
An Altus Group market update shows 360 newly built condominium units were sold locally in the first six months of 2018

NEWS Aug 10, 2018 by Natalie Paddon The Hamilton Spectator
https://www.thespec.com/news-story/8..._F_Tb0.twitter

A growing workforce and expansions in transit are two driving factors behind "notable traction" in new condominium sales in Hamilton over the first half of the year.

A Greater Golden Horseshoe market update from Altus Group released this week shows 360 new units were sold in Hamilton between January and June 2018.

"I don't think there's any surprise how much interest Hamilton is getting from a residential standpoint," said Ray Wong, vice-president of data operations at Altus Group.


Altus Group reported a "spike" in new condominium apartment sales in the first quarter of the year, which they said is largely attributed to the first phase of Television City, a proposed 30-storey condo tower by developer Brad Lamb.

That phase has since reached 80 per cent sold, according to the report, which includes information collected by developers, Wong said.

The second phase has seen 50 per cent of units sold, the market update reads.

People are heading down the highway from Toronto because they're able to get more "bang for their buck" but also because they're finding an increasing employment base in Hamilton, Wong said.

The city is well-positioned for commuters because of access to GO Transit, but it's also attractive to those with flexible working arrangements and people wanting to work in town, according to the market update.

Hamilton's planned LRT is also key to revitalizing the downtown and improving accessibility, the blog post notes.

Looking ahead, Altus Group predicts Hamilton will become "an increasingly attractive place to live," given its walkability and drawing in from the graduating student population.
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  #711  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2018, 1:02 AM
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LOL....too bad City Hall is trying to kill any hints of growth or momentum
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  #712  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2018, 11:40 AM
thistleclub thistleclub is offline
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Via CMHC:

New Housing Construction Starts, 2001-2017, Hamilton (C)

HOUSES
17,924 single
995 semi-detached
6,432 row

CONDOS
3,794 row
1,632 apartment
40 single
26 semi-detached

Downtown Core, Jan-July 2018: 54 starts (all apartment)
Downtown Core, Jan-July 2017: 103 starts (102 apartment, 1 single freehold)
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  #713  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2018, 12:44 PM
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Quote:
A Greater Golden Horseshoe market update from Altus Group released this week shows 360 new units were sold in Hamilton between January and June 2018.…

Altus Group reported a "spike" in new condominium apartment sales in the first quarter of the year, which they said is largely attributed to the first phase of Television City, a proposed 30-storey condo tower by developer Brad Lamb.

That phase has since reached 80 per cent sold, according to the report, which includes information collected by developers, Wong said.

The second phase has seen 50 per cent of units sold, the market update reads.
Since Television City is 618 units, almost all of new condo sales in Hamilton in the first half of the year would presumably be attached to that project.
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  #714  
Old Posted Aug 16, 2018, 3:50 PM
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"Altus Group reported a "spike" in new condominium apartment sales in the first quarter of the year, which they said is largely attributed to the first phase of Television City, a proposed 30-storey condo tower by developer Brad Lamb."

So Television CIty is now for sure only a max of 30 stories?
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  #715  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2018, 3:34 AM
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Which neighbourhoods have seen large spikes in rent? The Star mapped 5 years of rental data in 15 Canadian municipalities
(Toronto Star, Emily Mathieu, Nov. 22, 2018)

A conversation about housing has to start with numbers.

Whether you’re a tenant struggling to find a home or a government crafting new policy during a nationwide housing crisis, you need to have a grip on good data.

The hunt for rental housing, particularly in Toronto and Vancouver, has become increasingly competitive and confusing as the number of people looking to live in cities continues to outpace what is actually being built.

“Renters going to shop for a place to rent have almost no information,” said David Hulchanski, a housing and community development expert at the University of Toronto, who maps and studies the factors that drive neighbourhood change. “Most consumers shop blindly, they don’t know what is going on in different geographic areas.”

To try to cut through that confusion and provide renters with a bit more insight on where neighbourhood prices are heading the Toronto Star built an interactive map showing how a big slice of the complex market — purpose-built rentals — have gone up in price. The yearly average rents were provided by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, which tracks and reports information on rental prices and vacancy rates. The Star used those numbers to calculate how much average market rent for purpose-built rentals in the 15 largest metropolitan areas across the country changed between 2012 and 2017.


Read it in full here.

+

Derived from the Star's data visualization, here's how Hamilton's lower city stacks up, from Dundas to Stoney Creek.

Average Rent, 2017 (% change 2012-2017)

Overall
Dundas: $1,050 (18.9%)
West End A: $1,033 (24.0%)
West End B: $934 (15.7%)
Downtown A: $864 (18.2%)
Downtown B: $1,037 (30.8%)
Downtown C: $875 (29.2%)
Central A: $981 (23.6%)
Central B: $905 (23.0%)
Central C: $710 (4.6%)
Central East A: $801 (14.1%)
Central East B: $786 (20.4%)
East End A: $930 (30.3%)
East End B: $1,058 (42.0%)
Stoney Creek: $892 (13.6%)

1BR
Dundas: $981 (21.3%)
West End A: $911 (23.4%)
West End B: $863 (16.9%)
Downtown A: $784 (15.8%)
Downtown B: $960 (31.7%)
Downtown C: $826 (30.9%)
Central A: $813 (24.7%)
Central B: $856 (19.9%)
Central C: $664 (4.7%)
Central East A: $743 (13.1%)
Central East B: $726 (17.5%)
East End A: $805 (21.4%)
East End B: $926 (36.0%)
Stoney Creek: $760 (13.7%)

2BR
Dundas: $1,091 (17.7%)
West End A: $1,153 (25.3%)
West End B: $992 (15.1%)
Downtown A: $1,000 (19.0%)
Downtown B: $1,166 (27.7%)
Downtown C: $1,002 (28.6%)
Central A: $1,071 (26.7%)
Central B: $1,064 (22.3%)
Central C: $884 (19.4%)
Central East A: $843 (11.1%)
Central East B: $892 (21.4%)
East End A: $979 (36.2%)
East End B: $1,132 (50.5%)
Stoney Creek: $938 (13.7%)



Ordered from highest to lowest average rents…

Overall
East End B: $1,058
Dundas: $1,050
Downtown B: $1,037
West End A: $1,033
Central A: $981
West End B: $934
East End A: $930
Central B: $905
Stoney Creek: $892
Downtown C: $875
Downtown A: $864
Central East A: $801
Central East B: $786
Central C: $710

1BR
Dundas: $981
Downtown B: $960
East End B: $926
West End A: $911
West End B: $863
Central B: $856
Downtown C: $826
Central A: $813
East End A: $805
Downtown A: $784
Stoney Creek: $760
Central East A: $743
Central East B: $726
Central C: $664

2BR
Downtown B: $1,166
West End A: $1,153
East End B: $1,132
Dundas: $1,091
Central A: $1,071
Central B: $1,064
Downtown C: $1,002
Downtown A: $1,000
West End B: $992
East End A: $979
Stoney Creek: $938
Central East B: $892
Central C: $884
Central East A: $843


Ordered from highest to lowest relative increases…

Overall
East End B: 42.0%
Downtown B: 30.8%
East End A: 30.3%
Downtown C: 29.2%
West End A: 24.0%
Central A: 23.6%
Central B: 23.0%
Central East B: 20.4%
Dundas: 18.9%
Downtown A: 18.2% 
West End B: 15.7%
Central East A: 14.1%
Stoney Creek: 13.6%
Central C: 4.6%

1BR
East End B: 36.0%
Downtown B: 31.7%
Downtown C: 30.9%
Central A: 24.7%
West End A: 23.4%
East End A: 21.4%
Dundas: 21.3%
Central B: 19.9%
Central East B: 17.5%
West End B: 16.9%
Downtown A: 15.8%
Stoney Creek: 13.7%
Central East A: 13.1%
Central C: 4.7%

2BR
East End B: 50.5% 
East End A: 36.2%
Downtown C: 28.6%
Downtown B: 27.7%
West End A: 25.3%
Central B: 22.3%
Central East B: 21.4%
Central C: 19.4%
Downtown A: 19.0%
Dundas: 17.7%
West End B: 15.1%
Stoney Creek: 13.7%
Central East A: 11.1%
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Last edited by thistleclub; Nov 23, 2018 at 11:49 AM.
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  #716  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2018, 6:32 AM
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Wow, East end seeing HUGE increases there. Probably mostly around Crown Point neighborhood, I'd imagine.
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  #717  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2018, 12:12 PM
thistleclub thistleclub is offline
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Wow, East end seeing HUGE increases there. Probably mostly around Crown Point neighborhood, I'd imagine.
Crown Point is actually classified as Central East B.

Dundas: Dundas
West End A: Westdale North + Westdale South + Cootes Paradise + Ainslie Wood North + Ainslie Wood East + Ainslie Wood
West End B: Ainslie Wood West
Downtown A: Central + Beasley + Landsdale (above Cannon)
Downtown B: Durand (below Aberdeen)
Downtown C: Corktown + Stinson
Central A: Cannon/Queen/Sherman and north to the water
Central B: Chedoke Park + Kirkendall + Strathcona + Dundurn
Central C: St. Clair
Central East A: Blakely to Glenview East and south to the escarpment
Central East B: Stipley to McQuesten West and north to the water
East End A: Corman + Greenford + Vincent + Red Hill
East End B: Kentley + Nashdale + Riverdale (E/W) + Grayside + Lakely + Confederation Park
Stoney Creek: Stoney Creek
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Last edited by thistleclub; Nov 24, 2018 at 6:57 PM.
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  #718  
Old Posted Nov 26, 2018, 1:16 AM
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Over a third of GTHA residents in one-bedroom apartments live in unsuitable housing: Report
(Toronto Star, Jason Miller, Nov 25 2018)

When she prepares a meal for her family, Martha Lozada has to negotiate her way around her teenage son’s bed.

A makeshift curtain across the kitchen’s entrance barely serves as a privacy screen for Rafi, 14, and does little to shield his ears from the clinking and clanging in the kitchen.

Her two children used to share a room in their two-bedroom Flemingdon Park apartment, but now, with both having hit puberty, her son stays in the living room while her 16-year-old daughter occupies the second bedroom.

“I want to move into a bigger apartment, but I’m not able to do it because it’s too expensive,” Lozada said. “My son has to stay in the living room.”

Lozada’s family lives in what Statistics Canada classifies as unsuitable housing — lacking enough bedrooms for the number of people it houses.

Some 36 per cent of households living in one-bedroom dwellings in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area are not suitably housed, according to Statistics Canada data in a recent study from Malone Given Parsons, a planning consultant firm.

The figure dips to 21 per cent for those like Lozada, living in two-bedroom accommodations.

Housing suitability refers to whether a private household is living in appropriate accommodations, according to the National Occupancy Standard. Developed by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, the suitability requirement hinges on whether the dwelling has enough bedrooms for size and composition of the household, and assesses the required number of bedrooms per household based on the age, sex and relationships among household members.…

The National Occupancy Standard stipulates that there should be no more than two persons per bedroom. Children less than five years of age of different sexes may reasonably share a bedroom; Children five years of age or older of opposite sex should have separate bedrooms; Children less than 18 years of age and of the same sex may reasonably share a bedroom; and single household members 18 years or older should have a separate bedroom, as should parents or couples.

Using this measure, households that would require at least one additional bedroom are experiencing some degree of overcrowding.

The problem is more common among those who rent, according to another study by the Evergreen Housing Action Lab’s Missing Middle Working Group.

That study, also released this week, based on census data and numbers from the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp., found the number of households in unsuitable housing to be 31 per cent for those who rent, three times higher than those who own, at 8 per cent.


Read it in full here.

+

Here's the MGP report Greater Toronto and Hamilton and Area, Simcoe County, Barrie & Orillia Land Supply Analysis

Here's Evergreen's report What is the Missing Middle?
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  #719  
Old Posted Nov 26, 2018, 1:34 AM
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Hamilton plans long-term growth strategy for a future with 780,000 residents
(Stoney Creek News, Mike Pearson, Nov 23 2018)


Hamilton will need to plan for higher density development, including in designated greenfield areas like Elfrida as it prepares for an expected increase of 100,000 residents between 2031 and 2041.

According to the Elfrida Growth Area Study existing conditions report, finalized last year, the provincial density target for designated greenfield areas is 80 residents and jobs per hectare over the entire designated greenfield area.

For the Elfrida Growth Area, that would translate to over 80,000 people and jobs over the 1,250-hectare land mass.…

Ward 9 councillor-elect Brad Clark worries about plans to pave over farm fields in Elfrida, especially when the infrastructure is already struggling to keep up in the existing built-up areas of the ward.

“I still don’t understand why we haven’t done more infill development in the urban area along transit routes,” said Clark, who takes over as the city councillor for upper Stoney Creek on Dec. 3.

Development in existing urban areas is always the most prudent, said Clark, because hard costs, like sewer and water infrastructure, are already in place.

“The actual true cost to the municipality is very small compared to greenfield development. There are real significant burdens put on the taxpayer with greenfield development,” said Clark.

Clark said he spoke to several people over the course of the recent municipal election campaign that were surprised Rymal Road hadn’t been widened east of Fletcher Road. On the afternoon of Nov. 22, as the city was conducting an open house at the Heritage Green Baptist Church, traffic was gridlocked on Rymal due to the temporary closure of the Red Hill Valley Parkway.

With more people moving to Hamilton from the Greater Toronto Area in search of cheaper housing, Clark said the city is struggling to meet expectations.

“They’re coming from municipalities like Mississauga, where the infrastructure is there before you do your development. Ideally, we’ve got to put the cart back behind the horse. Let’s get the infrastructure, get it ready and then move forward with development.”


Read it in full here.
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  #720  
Old Posted Nov 26, 2018, 5:14 PM
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“I still don’t understand why we haven’t done more infill development in the urban area along transit routes,” said Clark, who takes over as the city councillor for upper Stoney Creek on Dec. 3.
Brad Clark is against LRT, but for infill. ?Que?
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