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  #12601  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2020, 9:07 PM
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Originally Posted by jbssfelix View Post
I'll see what I can do.
Thanks that does add value.

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Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
Anyway, I appreciate your priority list. I like the Broadway/Leetsdale line, but disagree completely with leaving Colfax out to dry, and would unquestionably trade away the 225 line to get it. Other stuff, like making the W line faster, is worth talking about but maybe outside the scope of re-imagining where to put lines.
With respect to East Colfax I've thought so long and hard over it I've gotten headaches. I've had nightmares over Colfax.

But I still have to disagree and I believe that if they do BRT right, that it will do the job. I understand the historical ridership numbers but the City of Denver has never cared about East Colfax. They've even had trouble getting buy-in for BRT.

If you think about it, while East Colfax is seeing growth most of the density being added near downtown has been or will be in a different direction/area.

I'm familiar with two urban light rail projects: in Phoenix and the Twin Cities Green Line.

Phoenix light rail, originally 20 miles, had a north-south segment along with its primary east-west route. It goes between two hot spots when you consider that Tempe has 55,000 students at its main campus and now another 10,000 students in downtown Phoenix. Downtown Tempe is now where all the corporate decision makers want to be.

With respect to the Twin Cities Green Line it goes between downtown Minneapolis and downtown St Paul as well as as the University of Minnesota. East Colfax goes from the edge of downtown Denver to nowhere north Aurora.

The original I-225 route was the H Line and was built as a part of T-REX for ~$42 million per mile. The H Line has always had the best ridership of all the suburb to city lines. The SE Corridor, now with both the E and F Lines does carry more riders than the H Line extended to and ending at the Florida Station. The new Florida Station however does have the best ridership of any station with zero parking and Nine Mile Station is still one of the top three stations for ridership outside of downtown.

Yeah, they never should have built the R Line.
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  #12602  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2020, 9:31 PM
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TakeFive sure can't answer questions directly, can he? Even if you give him a yes or no choice, instead of saying yes, he'll go off on a tangent about picking crab apples as a kid in rural Kansas or some shit. I'll bite, though.

Q1: Where do you end the Colfax line? Do you end it by curving north to meet the A line, south to meet Aurora Town Center or Buckley, or something else? Where do you turn off Colfax
- You end it 2 blocks east of Peoria at Children's. Let the development along the line mature and increase ridership then let the line extend further east with short extensions over the decades, like they did in the olden days (TakeFive can relate).

Q2: Where do you end the Leetsdale line?
Monaco or Quebec... unless you're including the part where it turns into Parker Rd. If so, extended it to 9 Mile and turn it SW into the old 225 stub line and let it continue to the Tech Center.

Q3: Where do you end the Civic Center-Union Station subway? At Union Station, or do you carry it into Highlands somehow?
End it underneath the Union Station plaza on the SE side and connect it to the building via a tunnel and have escalators exit directly onto the plaza. Highlands isn't worth the cost to tunnel under the Platte River and I-25, especially since there's not a whole lot of density along 17th street. Highlands would have to allow to much denser development for it to be worth it, otherwise it just becomes a parking/commuter station.

Q4: Without changing them too much, are there any minor tweaks you'd make to lines we're keeping in order to make your new re-imagined system work better together (for example, maybe you find a way to connect the A line to the Colfax line that requires moving an A line station somewhere).
The A line suffers from a pretty slow turn around York, where the train slows to a crawl as the wheels scrape against the tracks. Figure out a way to reroute here a little, and now knowing what we know about the crossing signal system, have the line bridge or go under more of the intersections. Peoria is decades away from being anything other than a busy transfer station. Just run a frequent bus down Peoria within a dedicated lane from the Colfax line up to the A line Peoria station. Oddly, the best parts of the R line are the parts that go right along the highway (usually a bad idea) simply because they are the straightest and allow for the most speed. The whole jog around the Aurora Town Center / Aurora grassfields and all of the turns and bends around the University make that line completely noncompetitive with the automobile.
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  #12603  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2020, 9:35 PM
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I guess you admitted this already, but I wouldn't categorize Austin as a "higher level than Denver" on much of anything. Denver beats Austin in every meaningful way to measure population or density. Austin does have taller buildings under construction currently. It's biggest asset over Denver is probably that UT is one-mile from downtown, and so gigantic.

Anyway, I appreciate your priority list. I like the Broadway/Leetsdale line, but disagree completely with leaving Colfax out to dry, and would unquestionably trade away the 225 line to get it. Other stuff, like making the W line faster, is worth talking about but maybe outside the scope of re-imagining where to put lines.
I would agree. Austin definitely has the tech boom going for it, but it's downtown is only as tall as it is because it's core downtown acreage is more geographically limited compared to Denver (bounded by the river, and MoPac/I-35), so a lot of space tries to cram into those confines.

Denver has a lot of open land within the urban core, so there isn't as much incentive to build tall when you can still build out.
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  #12604  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2020, 9:47 PM
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Originally Posted by The Dirt View Post
TakeFive sure can't answer questions directly, can he?
I won't necessarily disagree but I would point out I typed my previous comment before seeing/reading Cirrus' new post.

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You know what, let's play the armchair re-imaging game a little more.
Before I go there I want to make one key point.

I previously posted the data and IIRC Austin makes up over 80% of the Cap Metro district (population) so for the most part Austin residents will be funding transit.

In Phoenix, the city paid for their light rail; Tempe paid for it's portion of the original project and Mesa paid for the eastward extension into Mesa.

Minneapolis/St Paul is more fortunate in that the State has carried a lot of the financial burden.
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  #12605  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2020, 10:18 PM
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That's relevant. I'm on board with the political necessities to give coverage to enough places to win funding. This is one of the reasons why, in our re-imagined FasTracks, I wanted to talk about where we might end the two lines that go to Aurora.
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  #12606  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2020, 11:14 PM
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That's relevant. I'm on board with the political necessities to give coverage to enough places to win funding. This is one of the reasons why, in our re-imagined FasTracks, I wanted to talk about where we might end the two lines that go to Aurora.
The Dirt is partly right in that I can't let you write All The Rules but I can come close enough.

With respect to the G (Gold) Line I would have had Phase One construction stop at Olde Town Arvada. Instead I'd add a (Phase One) segment of the N Line (only) up to 104 Ave.

From my "Third Priority" I'd still include the H Line extension to add the Iliff Station and ending at the Florida Station.

I'd still do the Parker Road to E. Iliff segment to the (new) Iliff station east of I-225.

Note: Leetsdale becomes Parker Rd at So Quebec St. which is where Denver turns into unincorporated Arapahoe County (and not Aurora) and in Cherry Creek School Dist. That area to the south called Indian Creek as well as the area east of Parker Rd has solid (urban-suburban) density. Turning east on Iliff ave (at Parker) which is Aurora, would also run through solid density whereas Parker Rd SE of Peoria St would be 7-lane light rail unfriendly.

At the end of Phase One, RTD should still have ~$1 billion to play with plus any additional FTA grants.

Next, I have RTD offer City of Denver a 50-50 split of costs for a Colorado Blvd LRT from the Colorado Station on the south up to the A Line 40th Street Station.

Similarly, RTD should offer Westminster a 50-50 cost sharing to extend the B Line up to the new Westminster downtown at U.S. 36.
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  #12607  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2020, 7:08 PM
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FasTracks - a ten year retrospective of a visionary plan

When the N Line opens this September it will put a wrap on the FasTracks construction - for now (and forever?).

The vision of RTD's suburb to city spoke and wheel design was intended to direct future development along lines to create more TOD density instead of sprawl. (Life is what happens when you're making other plans).

With the N Line opening, downtown Denver will have six light/commuter rail spokes or routes into the city. Nobody anticipated back in the early 2000's the phenomenal development in the city's core and surrounding neighborhoods.

Is the City of Denver getting its share of benefit from FasTracks?

The short answer is "Yes, in spades". To a degree all you have to know is the A Line - train to the planes and the Denver Union Station Neighborhood.

Developers and/or the City have impressive TOD planned along all six of the routes (into downtown) with 8 stations identified for current and future intense development. More $billions of TOD projects have already been identified/planned by developers.

What's the panic?

The W Line opened in April of 2013 so 7 years ago. The A and B Lines opened in April and July of 2016 or 4 years ago; the N Line hasn't even opened yet, but soon.

Comparing Denver's transit rail system to cities with multiple times the density and rail lines that have been there for decades is a bit premature.

Denver is the heartbeat of the whole metro area
  1. The four major sports teams all play in or on the edge of downtown Denver? Check!
  2. The City of Denver has some amazing cultural arts facilities? Check!
  3. Denver is where most of the state and city government facilities are? Check!
  4. Denver downtown needs/wants to minimize vehicle traffic and parking? Check!
Your standards are not my standards

There's great value added when all parts of the metro area can access the sports and cultural facilities by rail as apposed to driving. I'm less concerned with ridership metrics (per mile) given the length of the various rail lines. With completion of FasTracks in September, give the whole system another decade before judging too harshly. I still expect more TOD to evolve along most of the lines in the suburbs as well as the city center. Much of it is already known.

The City of Denver versus RTD ??

Re-imagining RTD? That's fine; we'll wait and see. (I've ranted about the bus service enough already).

If the City of Denver wants much better transit within the City then they need to put on their Big Boy britches and plan/pay for it, just like other cities have done. Whining about RTD makes (Streetsbloggers) sound as bad as Trump who blames everybody but himself.
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  #12608  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2020, 6:50 PM
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The future of transit in Denver is 'tricky'

I know what we should do; let's form a Blue Ribbon Panel.

Gov. Polis announces new accountability board to oversee RTD
June 18, 2020 by Meghan Lopez - 7News Denver
Quote:
Over the next year this independent committee will conduct a top to bottom review and recommend the steps that are needed systemically, Gov. Polis promised during the press conference.

“The work is going to include a review of recent financials and recent audits, the structure of RTD governance and leadership, a review of the short term and long term use of resources,” Gov. Polis said.
Why this could be a good thing

As is typically the case there is no shortage of uninformed opinions. One of RTD's biggest issues is there are too many demands from divergent groups and interests.

To RTD's credit they have lots and lots of data and studies to inform the analysis and debate by such an esteemed group of people. Let them do a deep dive into every crook and cranny and we'll see how their collective wisdom focuses (or not).

My hope is that by studying all the budgetary issues they'll learn better the economic challenges and limitations. It's good that 'the state' is getting involved; learning should be enlightening. We will see.
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  #12609  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2020, 7:03 PM
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Gov Polis, as the state's Top Dog set the tone for moving RTD forward

Polis Says RTD Still Must Build Boulder Train In Spite Of Coronavirus Cuts
June 17, 2020 By Nathaniel Minor - CPR News
Quote:
Gov. Jared Polis said Wednesday that the Regional Transportation District must follow through on its promise to build a rail line from Denver to Boulder and Longmont.

That’s in spite of RTD’s looming budget shortfall. The agency is now projecting a cumulative $1.3 billion hit to its budget through 2026, which will likely lead to deep and long-lasting cuts to service. Meanwhile, the most recent cost estimate for the train is about $1.5 billion.
Governor Polis, Sir, are you sure that dog can hunt?
Quote:
“The train has to come. It was part of the 2004 ballot initiative,” Polis said, referencing the FasTracks vote that approved a tax increase for a massive rail expansion. “It’s a binding vote of the people,” he said, adding that another vote would be required to alleviate RTD of its obligation to deliver the project.
Hoo Boy; nothing like getting off to a fast start.

There's no guarantee that a Blue Ribbon Panel is a good idea. Let's hope the collective wisdom doesn't go down hill from here.
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  #12610  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2020, 8:00 PM
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Is the City of Denver getting its share of benefit from FasTracks?

Your standards are not my standards
This does put our differences into focus. I'm not concerned about Denver getting its "fair share." I'm am concerned about having a transit system that supports the most people who would use it, and enables the most possible people to start using it. Because transit is a means to having good urbanism, not an end in and of itself. I really don't care about political boundaries at all, except to the extent that I recognize the practical necessities of planning a system that gets the votes it needs to be approved.
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  #12611  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2020, 8:47 PM
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This does put our differences into focus. I'm not concerned about Denver getting its "fair share." I'm am concerned about having a transit system that supports the most people who would use it, and enables the most possible people to start using it. Because transit is a means to having good urbanism, not an end in and of itself. I really don't care about political boundaries at all, except to the extent that I recognize the practical necessities of planning a system that gets the votes it needs to be approved.
Fair points; cleanly stated. I have no problem respecting your thinking and can lean-in to a degree.

For example I have suggested that both the G Line and N Line's initial (Phase One) build-out should have been shorter stopping at Olde Town Arvada for the G Line and stopping at 104th ave for the N Line. I've also stated the R Line should never have been built - except for extending the H Line two stations.

It's get tricky though. IMO Denver didn't really have any ideal light rail routes except for the A Line to DIA. In theory the SE Corridor - not a part of FasTracks but built as a part of T-REX - connecting downtown with Denver Tech Center including a stop for Denver University seems to fit ideal but primarily First and Last Mile issues have diminished the return.

Modifying the above, I have endlessly promoted both the Urban Signature Line plus a Colorado Blvd Line. With these examples I blame the City of Denver. They should have stepped up and said: "Heh, we'll pay 50% of the cost to partner with you (RTD) on these two lines." The U/S line would also have included pieces of unincorporated Arapahoe County and Aurora.

One Big Picture issue is the City of Denver hardly had any more density than many parts of the suburbs - though that varies - until the explosion of growth downtown starting about the same time as the Great Recession.

Just released by the Downtown Denver Partnership employment downtown has grown a healthy 4.7% to 145,000 people. Still this is less than 10% of the total metro employment even if downtown does have the best employment density. How does this impact what a good light rail (or bus) system should look like?
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  #12612  
Old Posted Jun 23, 2020, 5:34 AM
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I'm am concerned about having a transit system that supports the most people who would use it, and enables the most possible people to start using it. Because transit is a means to having good urbanism, not an end in and of itself.
If we were to go back in time and if I were to list my three top corridors for light rail - all of which would be textbook - they would be:
  1. From Denver Union Station to DIA
  2. My Urban Signature Line (and for simplicity we'll run down Parker Rd all the way to Nine Mile Station).
  3. Colorado Blvd from Colorado Station on the south to 40th ave and Colorado Station on the north.
The cost of those in comparable $'s to FasTracks would be
  1. $1.5 billion
  2. $700 million
  3. $450 million
Let's be generous and assume that RTD would agree to fund the operating costs for all three lines - but not the capital costs or infrastructure maintenance costs The obvious question now is "How do we fund the damn thing?"

The Urban Signature Line could be divided equally between Denver and Aurora (and technically unincorporated Arapahoe County north of Hampden Ave). Assuming an FTA grant for $315 million (45%) would those voters agree to fund the other $385 million? They might have.

The Colorado Blvd Line would be up to Denver obviously.

With respect to the train to the planes there ought be some creative way to fund that but I have no clue what it would be.

The irony is (if you will) that I'm not aware that City/County of Denver had any inclination or desire for funding any of the above.
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  #12613  
Old Posted Jun 24, 2020, 2:40 PM
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Smile N Line opening in September

Not sure how much ridership it's going to have during the pandemic, but nice to see some progress....

https://www.9news.com/article/news/l...2-ce5607221404
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  #12614  
Old Posted Jun 26, 2020, 9:38 PM
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Not sure how much ridership it's going to have during the pandemic, but nice to see some progress....

https://www.9news.com/article/news/l...2-ce5607221404
Thanks for finding that.

It's now an official threat that the the N Line will open on September 21st. There's been a few delaying issues along the way which nobody cares about now that it's set to open. Construction started in March of 2014 so yeah that's a tortuous period of time. As you suggest, under current COVID conditions ridership is likely to be lighter than whatever it would have been. I mean those folks can't even take in a Rockies game. Bleh.
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  #12615  
Old Posted Jun 26, 2020, 10:30 PM
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Coming out of the closet

Seems like PLANSIT has been alluding to this for couple of years but things are now going public. We have seen the 1st fruits of his efforts with the bus and bike lanes on 15th street.

The future of downtown Denver’s transportation system:
Jun. 19, 2020 By David Sachs - Denverite
Quote:
Many of Denver’s downtown streets aren’t organized for the people who use them most... And demand on those streets will only grow over the next two decades.

That’s the thinking behind “Denver Moves: Downtown,” the latest transport-focused plan from the city planners... Like its cousins, the downtown mobility scheme (which is still in production) has mounds of information about how people move around... and a lot of ideas on how to prioritize the cleanest, most efficient modes of travel... Also like its cousins, most of the stuff in the downtown transport plan is unfunded with no guarantee of realization.
City now has it's own Denver Moves Downtown website page which has lots of information and is also designed to engage the public. For example, a virtual open house was held on June 10th and they have an invitation to take a public survey.

Conflating Issues
Quote:
By 2030, the city government aims to reduce car commutes from around 70 percent to 50 percent in part because vehicle emissions are the city’s second-largest contributor to climate change-causing greenhouse gases.
Hopefully by 2030 we'll be well on the way to zero emission vehicle adoption.

Not a biggie but that "50% car commutes" goal is for the whole city while this downtown plan will only address and impact some of that. But with respect to downtown commutes, the Downtown Denver Partnership recently released the results from last year's survey so let's have a look:


Source: DDP

As you can see, at least in 2019, people commuting by driving their own car was down to less than 33%.
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  #12616  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2020, 4:48 PM
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It's looking more and more like my common-sense predictions may just happen

These 4 Maps Show How RTD’s Bus Service Could Change (And Shrink) Next Year
July 1, 2020 By Nathaniel Minor - CPR
Quote:
“I’ll be frank, not everybody is going to like the tradeoffs,” Bill Sirois, RTD’s senior manager of transit-oriented communities, told the board earlier this year. “There will be winners; there will be losers.”

Each scenario takes into account an 8 percent cut from pre-pandemic service levels. The final product will almost certainly include greater cuts...
Hardly a surprise.
Quote:
It’s entirely possible that the board will choose none of the above. In a brief discussion after the presentation, some board members said they wanted to see hybrids of them.
Now this sounds a whole lot like what I had suggested.
Quote:
And an informal poll by the board showed clear support for prioritizing a regional transit backbone while supporting partnerships where communities pay for and operate local service — at least in the more immediate future when RTD’s budget is tightest.

That would mark a significant change for the way metro transit has worked since RTD’s formation about 50 years ago. It’s been the dominant provider since then.

"It's pretty obvious to all of us that we are not able to do the kind of service that we have done in the past, and that we need to look at ways to partner to provide service to areas that need it,” said Denver board member Kate Williams.
Kate Williams is assuming that City of Denver is more than willing to support transit within the city. She may be right and that's how it should be.

My gratitude to the Pandemic

Instead of a painfully slow process of a decade or longer, the Pandemic has forced the Board to think in terms of a whole new reality. There is this obvious potential problem:
Quote:
But that could be politically difficult unless RTD sends some of its own money to local governments, said board member Natalie Menten of Lakewood. “The taxpayers may view this as double taxation,” she said.

It’s also possible that some areas that lose service could leave RTD and subsequently stop paying the agency’s 1 percent sales tax like Castle Rock did in 2005.
I disagree with that last sentence. AFAIK, those counties and areas that voted for .4 tenths sales tax increase in FasTracks - I assume are obligated by that vote, especially since all counties are now served by light or commuter rail (or BRT). As to other .6 tenths that is likely an entirely different question.
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  #12617  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2020, 11:13 PM
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Your standards are not my standards

New study pans airport rail lines in Utah, Denver, Dallas as pricey boondoggles
Published: May 5 By Lee Davidson - The Salt Lake Tribune
Quote:
A new study says light rail lines to airports may be popular politically, but they don’t make sense economically.
https://media4.manhattan-institute.o...ht-rail-CH.pdf
Quote:
This paper aims to help planners and citizens evaluate when new light rail lines are justified. First, we will explore the economics behind the choice between light rail and buses, as well as how to determine the best locations of lines. Our analysis of ridership on 23 U.S. light rail systems shows that proximity to development and jobs is necessary for success. Unfortunately, very few places that are not already served by light rail systems have the features necessary to make them viable and would be better served by expanded bus service.
Guilty as charged
Quote:
Further, we highlight several common errors that light rail planners have made: overexpansion of systems into low-density areas; overvaluing certain classes of destinations such as airports; and the use of low-quality rightsof-way that sacrifice ridership to avoid political controversies during construction. These errors have led to the construction of many existing light rail systems in fundamentally unviable areas.
The above is a good summary of good textbook stuff. It's not wrong. But one of us lives in fantasy land, the other in the real world.

The source for the piece in the Salt Lake Tribune was a 'paper' by Connor Harris of the Manhattan Institute, a conservative think tank so there's a couple of things going on. For starters, they are a part of an anti-tax crowd who argues for (cheaper) bus service over costly light rail as a matter of principle. The other thing of note is that the Manhattan Institute is appropriately located at 52 Vanderbilt Avenue, New York City, NY.

Did anybody else get a good laugh at some 'expert' from Manhattan who's never been to Denver, knows little to nothing about Denver concluding that the A Line train to the planes is a boondoggle?

How about a real world example

The city of Nashville and Davidson County brought in a transit planner-expert from NYC to help create a transit plan to take to the voters. They did indeed come up with a very good plan; it was a transit planner's wet dream. Problem was when they went to the voters they not only failed, they got beat like a drum. That was two years ago. So now Nashville has no money for transit improvements and No Plan.

My point about textbook standards is not that they are wrong but most of the well-done plans end up being tomes sitting on a shelf. What is there value if they lead to absolutely nothing other than being a shelf filler.

Some of you might argue that doing nothing would have been better but that's a topic needing further examination. We've already discussed the literally $billions of TOD that will come. Does any of that yet show up as ridership? A silly rhetorical question of course.
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  #12618  
Old Posted Jul 4, 2020, 11:23 PM
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A Tribute to Trains

by necessity this is historical and any good tribute starts with a classic.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_of_New_Orleans_(song)
Quote:
"City of New Orleans" is a country folk song written by Steve Goodman... Goodman got the idea while traveling on the Illinois Central line for a visit to his wife's family. The song has been recorded by numerous artists both in the US and Europe, including two major hit versions: first by Arlo Guthrie in 1972, and later by Willie Nelson in 1984.
Video Link


The end of the video explains its creation. Amazing visuals and if you have the time, it's worth your time to read thru the comments. This song/video brought a lot of grown men to tears.

Everybody loves trains and I was like a kid with a new toy

It's been two years since I rode the rails of FasTracks. With limited time I rode the W Line, the H Line, the A Line (a few times) and the B Line.

The day was Sunday, June 24, 2018

On my return trip into downtown on the W Line I was surprised by the number of riders. Leaving Golden about 11:30 a.m. there was already a number if people heading to the Rockies game. Likely, they intended to catch something to eat beforehand. Some appeared to bring their own picnic lunch. There was also a number of young riders presumably headed to the 16th Street Mall dressed up in some pretty funky clothes.

That Federal Station is really nice. I'll assume that it acts in many ways like an 'end of line' station appealing to 'park 'n riders' from an extensive area.

Riding the H Line

When a heavy downpour hit downtown I cancelled any notion of going to the Rockies game and once the rain let up I found my way over to the 18th and Stout Station. Lots of people waiting at that station. A couple of other trains stopped before an H Line train arrived. I'd guess at least 20 passengers boarded at that one stop. Cars looked to be mostly full of seated riders after a couple of more stops.

Riding the R Line

I exited the H Line at Florida to wait for an R Line train. Only a few waiting and I asked this young attractive black girl a question. She had to remove her ear buds to say "Wut". I asked if we have to wait nearly 20 minutes for the next train headed north. She responded "Nah, those signs are screwed up; there should be a train arrive in a few minutes." She was correct.

The Peoria Station

Another impressive station I boarded heading back into downtown. Again, at least two-thirds of the seats were occupied.

Boarding the B Line

Not as busy; maybe a third of the seats were occupied. I love that Westminster Station and once all that TOD gets built it will be nice.
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  #12619  
Old Posted Jul 16, 2020, 7:49 PM
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Photo courtesy RTD via Mass Transit Mag - Englewood Station

Denver RTD's Southwest Light Rail Line turns 20 years old
Jul 16th, 2020 - Mass Transit Mag courtesy RTD
Quote:
The Regional Transportation District (RTD) of Denver marked the 20th anniversary of the opening of the Southwest Light Rail Line from I-25 and Broadway to Englewood and Littleton on July 14.

The line was the first to serve the south metro suburbs by rail. The Southwest Rail Line – an extension of the D Line – added five new stations, at Evans, Englewood, Oxford, Littleton•Downtown and Littleton•Mineral.
As a result of great collaboration they built this first suburb to city line for the cost of a song.
Quote:
The Southwest Line is one of RTD's great examples of regional collaboration between RTD, the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT), the Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) and local governments. Elected officials along the Southwest Corridor joined RTD officials in Washington, D.C., to advocate for federal funds to help build the line.
Speaking of songs, according to Billboard in 2000, Santana had two of the top three songs of the year with their Smooth ft Rob Thomas with cool video coming in second.

This was the project that seeded FasTracks as opening TV coverage of their Park N Ride overflowing and spilling into the neighborhood had other cities drooling. The naysayers had loudly and proudly proclaimed that the cowboys in Highlands Ranch would never ride a choo choo. They hit their ten year projections for ridership within the first week of operation.

I can't keep up so I'm glad somebody else is keeping time
Quote:
Since RTD opened its first light rail line, the Central Corridor, in 1994, the agency’s rail system has grown to include 60.1 miles of light rail track and 40 miles of commuter rail track, with 73 stations. The opening of the N Line will add 13 new miles of commuter rail track and six new stations.
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  #12620  
Old Posted Jul 23, 2020, 3:57 AM
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Source

Metro 'gets moving' on $5 billion transportation measure
Jul 20, 2020 By Maddie Pfeifer – Contributing writer, Portland Business Journal
Quote:
The Metro Council unanimously voted last week to send the “Get Moving 2020” measure to voters on the Nov. 3 ballot. The measure would help fund such major projects as the Southwest Corridor MAX line as well as safety and accessibility improvements in Washington, Clackamas and Multnomah counties.

Come November, residents across the Portland metro region will get the chance to vote on a $5 billion transportation measure that would fund investments in 17 corridors across the area and funnel $1 billion over 20 years into 10 major transit-related programs.

The measure has been in the works for more than 18 months. A 35-member task force met with community members and made recommendations to the Metro Council before an official council vote on July 16 solidified the measure’s future.
The hope is that raising $5 billion would result in as much as $8 billion including Federal Grants.

So how you gonna raise all that tax revenue and how do you entice the voters to approve this?
We don't want to burden all of our hard-working residents so we'll let businesses pay for this.
Quote:
The $5 billion of funding would come from a payroll tax on businesses up to 0.75 percent of their wages paid in the Metro region. According to Metro, businesses with 25 or fewer employees along with state and local governments would be exempt from the tax.
Easy Peasy!
Quote:
"These programs ensure that everyone in the region has an opportunity to benefit from the transportation measure," Margi Bradway, the deputy director of Metro's planning department said in a press release.

According to the analysis, 60 percent of the total investments in the corridors are in areas where a high concentration of people of color live.
Dream now; pay later. In a nod to the Pandemic, the tax wouldn't start until 2022.
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