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  #161  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2019, 3:38 PM
WildCowboy WildCowboy is offline
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Originally Posted by viewguysf View Post
That’s really puny for well known observation wheels! I was at the Singapore Flyer today and it’s just over 541 feet. The London Eye is 443 feet.
Those are of course permanent installations. The SkyStar coming to GGP is the largest portable one in the country.

https://www.skystarwheel.com
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  #162  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2020, 12:06 AM
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Treasure Island residents sue to halt 8,000-home megaproject over contamination
By Laura Waxmann – Real Estate Reporter, San Francisco Business Times
Jan 21, 2020, 12:17pm PST Updated 13 minutes ago

Current and former residents of Treasure Island filed a class-action lawsuit Tuesday saying they were misled about the island's toxic history

The lawsuit seeks $2 billion in damages, according to attorney Stanley Goff, who filed the suit in San Francisco Superior Court on behalf of 47 named plaintiffs. Goff said as many as 2,000 residents could be added and eligible for damages if they prevail in court.

The lawsuit alleges that the U.S. Navy did not properly assess “the levels of cesium-137, a fission byproduct, in soil samples dating back to the 1970s” before entering into an agreement with San Francisco to allow civilians — many of whom were formerly homeless — to move to the island after the Navy ceased its operations there in 1997 . . . .

Named as defendants are developer Lennar and its offshoot, Five Point Holdings, and two Navy contractors involved in the island’s remediation, Tetra Tech E.C. and Shaw Environmental.

The lawsuit alleges that the defendants were aware of the extent of the island’s contamination and that it was not safe for habitation, but failed to warn residents . . . .

“In reality, contamination levels are some three times higher than the Navy reported, and 60 percent higher than the Navy's own safety guidelines,” the lawsuit alleges.

A Department of Toxic Substances Control spokesperson confirmed previously that dioxin, lead, petroleum and radioactive isotopes are among the chemicals of concern on the island . . . .

. . . the Navy . . . used the island for naval training exercises that included detecting and cleaning radioactive contamination from ships . . . .
https://www.bizjournals.com/sanfranc...9LNlRlajZJaCJ9

I actually worked on Treasure Island in the 1980s in the field of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. I worked directly with the Industrial Hygienists responsible for surveying for environmental hazards. I'm not aware of any radioactive materials in use or existing on the island. What the Navy did there was firefighting training including, I imagine radioactive cleanup but they didn't use actual radioactive material other than, perhaps, sealed samples to teach the students how to detect them. Treasure Island was very different from Hunters' Point which was an active shipyard where nuclear-powered ships were drydocked and repaired at one time. Everybody was well aware of the potential hazards in that activity which are many. But Treasure Island just had schools, barracks, family housing, the firefighting facility and piers where a reserve frigate squadron (not nuclear armed) docked. This latter activity might have led to some minor petroleum contamination (akin to any gas station) and the old buildings may have contained some asbestos and/or lead paint (like any WW II vintage neighborhood).

So I think this lawsuit is BS but undoubtedly it has the potential, like any lawsuit, to delay the project for years.
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  #163  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2020, 6:16 PM
gillynova gillynova is offline
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There's plenty of new screenshots/renderings (or ones I've never seen) in this article

https://www.sfgate.com/living/articl...photo-19035601
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  #164  
Old Posted Jun 1, 2020, 4:18 PM
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Treasure Island

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  #165  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2020, 5:51 AM
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Treasure Island

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  #166  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2020, 9:39 PM
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First affordable homes break ground in Treasure Island redevelopment plan
By Laura Waxmann – Staff Reporter, San Francisco Business Times
Sep 18, 2020, 4:23pm PDT Updated 5 hours ago

The first segment of thousands of new homes planned as part of Treasure Island’s massive redevelopment effort broke ground on Friday.

Sixty-five of the 104 new units will be reserved for veterans currently experiencing homelessness, while the remaining units will house formerly homeless veterans. Construction is expected to wrap up in 2022.

The six-story, modular construction building is designed by Mithun and co-developed by the Chinatown Community Development Center and the Bay Area nonprofit Swords to Plowshares, which focuses on supporting veterans with social services including supportive housing and employment . . . .

Maceo May will feature a mix of studios, one-bedroom and two-bedroom units, and include a meal program and common open space that includes a forested “healing garden,” a playground and solar-powered community room.

Following on Maceo May, the next vertical construction will be four market rate rental communities, all of which include inclusionary BMR housing; they are set to break ground next year,” said Treasure Island Community Development spokesperson P.J. Johnston. “Treasure Island is getting closer to its promise of becoming one of the nation’s most socioeconomically diverse neighborhoods” . . . .


https://www.bizjournals.com/sanfranc...FyeWVpUGoxUSJ9
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  #167  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2021, 7:33 PM
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Concrete Starts Rising On Treasure Island In Regions Largest Residential Development
BY: ANDREW NELSON 5:30 AM ON APRIL 6, 2021

While sales for housing on Yerba Buena Island are underway, the first sign of concrete is finally visible on Treasure Island. The first of many buildings to come is rising at parcel C3.2, a 100% affordable housing development called the Maceo May Apartments. Its 105 units are a fraction of the largest master plan for residential construction in the Bay Area. The approximately 8,000-unit plan for the two islands is being developed by Treasure Island Community Development (TICD), a partnership with Stockbridge Capital Group, Wilson Meany, and Lennar Corporation.

The Maceo May Apartments is a $75 million six-story modular building. The structure spans 104,500 square feet for 105 units, ranging from studios to two-bedroom units for formerly homeless veterans and their families. The project will be delivered to the Chinatown Community Development Center and Swords to Plowshares, a Bay Area-based developer.

Mithun is responsible for the architecture. The facade will feature a sleek design with a white facade, and bronze-toned highlights sat on top of a recessed base with curtain wall and dark panels. The project is expected to be finished by 2022.







The property is opposite from C2.1, which is expecting a 345-foot mixed-use tower with design by Handel Architects. The building will produce 265 dwelling units and parking for 189 vehicles across 545,480 square feet.



The Maceo May Apartments is a part of phase one in construction, which has a combined 3,571 unit build-out, the largest of the four phases. Phase one will also introduce the adaptive reuse of existing buildings, 202,000 square feet of office, 67,000 square feet of retail, and 42,000 square feet of circulation space.

There will be 140,000 square feet of retail, 300 new hotel rooms, and 100,000 square feet of new offices for new buildings. 72.4 acres of public and open space will reshape what is currently the very inaccessible Yerba Buena Island. There will be 31.2 acres of open public space on Treasure Island.



The current approximate target to finish phase one is around 2026 to 2027, after existing residents move into new housing and ferry services begin in 2023. Bus services to Oakland and the East Bay will start in the summer of 2023, with MUNI services increasing by 2027.
https://sfyimby.com/2021/04/concrete...velopment.html
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  #168  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2021, 8:28 PM
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Sweet! A little taste of South Beach to complement North Beach, although I guess there technically is already a South Beach in SF.
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  #169  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2021, 9:51 PM
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It would be nice if they could add to the waterline of Treasure Island using landfill to make it look more natural and less geometric.
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  #170  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2021, 10:40 PM
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Sweet! A little taste of South Beach to complement North Beach, although I guess there technically is already a South Beach in SF.
East Beach?
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  #171  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2021, 10:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Busy Bee View Post
It would be nice if they could add to the waterline of Treasure Island using landfill to make it look more natural and less geometric.
I was working on Treasure Island in 1989 and saw the sand boils and water spouts. Frankly, I wouldn't want to live in any construction there. I suppose adding some natural contouring could be done to the shoreline but don't expect anything not strongly buttressed by rock to last long. Between the strong tides and liquifaction it'll disappear soon enough.
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  #172  
Old Posted Apr 7, 2021, 5:47 PM
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^Wow... I had no idea it had those kinds of issues... Yikes...
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  #173  
Old Posted Apr 7, 2021, 8:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Busy Bee View Post
^Wow... I had no idea it had those kinds of issues... Yikes...
It not only had that but the utility lines travel in the causeway ramp down from the Bay Bridge and those all broke in 1989.

Quote:
Treasure Island sinking into Bay
Rachel Gordon, OF THE EXAMINER STAFF
July 27, 1995
Updated: Feb. 7, 2012 9:07 p.m.

It's not going down as fast as the Titanic, but it's slipping into the Bay at a steady pace, according to a study for the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency. That raises the possibility that as much as half the island could be put off-limits to development when the Navy leaves in 1997.

At its creation in 1939 for the World's Fair, Treasure Island stood 14 feet above sea level; today it's at 9 feet, thanks, in part, to the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake.

If another big quake hits, the 404-acre landfill may ooze into the Bay even faster, unless the crumbling dikes and levees surrounding the island are shored up or replaced before then. The scenario is outlined in a new seismic study of the island commissioned by the Redevelopment Agency.

"If there were an earthquake, there'd be lateral spreading - the island would move, split apart," said Larry Florin, director of project development for the Redevelopment Agency.

But with the right amount of money and engineering ingenuity, the island - or at least part of it - can be saved, city officials say. The estimated cost to fix up the island's riprap frame: $69 million to $500 million, depending on the extent of the work . . . .

"The real news out of this report is that we're considering stabilizing a smaller portion of the island," said Gloria Root, chairwoman of the Treasure Island Citizens Reuse Committee.

In the short run, she said, the dikes and levees could be strengthened to protect perhaps half the island. In the longer run, she said, when more money becomes available and the will is there, the rest could be shored up.

What isn't protected, she said, could be converted to parkland or other recreational uses that don't require buildings . . . .

During the Loma Prieta earthquake, the dikes and levees - a series of boulders and rocks intended to keep the Bay out and the landfill from drifting away - sustained significant damage.

Treasure Island, which had been slowly eroding even without the earth shaking, fell between 6 inches and 2 feet closer to sea level in 1989
, depending on the location, Root said.
https://www.sfgate.com/news/article/...ay-3139267.php

One assumes quite a bit of bolstering is being done as part of the construction now ongoing. I watched the Navy build a new medical clinic after 1989 and they "densified" the soil with tons and tons of rock. The new construction must involve pilings and bolstering the island perimeter. But Mother Nature has a way of winning these fights.
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  #174  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2021, 7:12 AM
timbad timbad is offline
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In the short run, ... the dikes and levees could be strengthened to protect perhaps half the island. ...

What isn't protected ... could be converted to parkland or other recreational uses that don't require buildings . . . .
just looking at the site plan, this seems to be what they are doing?



source
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  #175  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2021, 5:13 PM
aahuatzi aahuatzi is offline
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correct me if I'm wrong, but I heard that there were plans to build a Ferris wheel on treasure island that would be 700 feet tall and named the Golden Gate Flyer
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  #176  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2021, 4:43 AM
gillynova gillynova is offline
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Originally Posted by aahuatzi View Post
correct me if I'm wrong, but I heard that there were plans to build a Ferris wheel on treasure island that would be 700 feet tall and named the Golden Gate Flyer
I don't think they're moving forward with that anymore and instead, they built a temporary 150' tall ferris wheel in Golden Gate Park for their 150th anniversary. I believe it's staying there until 2023-2024?
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