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  #59241  
Old Posted Sep 30, 2022, 3:01 PM
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MichaelRyerson MichaelRyerson is offline
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Sincerest condolences CaliNative.
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  #59242  
Old Posted Sep 30, 2022, 3:44 PM
Mstimc Mstimc is offline
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Originally Posted by CaliNative View Post

Been a very rough week, lost my mother last Saturday. She was almost 102. She was born on Christmas Day, 1920. Wilson was still President. She remembered the 1920s. Very few left who do. Why I love the 1920s. She had lots of memories, even though she was a kid. I love you mom and will miss you terribly, but I will remember you and your stories of the "Roaring 20s" and the "Dirty 30s", and may share them soon so your memories are not forgotten.
So sorry, Cali. My mother was born in 1920 as well and died in 2000. She moved here as a small child and grew up across the street from Echo Park. One of my most cherished possessions is a letter she wrote to her travelling salesman dad about riding out the 1932 earthquake. Its great your mom had a chance to share her stories with you. We can honor them by sharing their stories with others. Take care.
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  #59243  
Old Posted Sep 30, 2022, 6:44 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Pioneer Chicken and the Egyptian Theater, playing They Only Kill Their Masters,
at Hollywood Blvd. & McCadden Place, 1973.

The film opened in November, 1972. So an early 1973 date with Christmas decorations could be correct.

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  #59244  
Old Posted Yesterday, 5:14 AM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Originally Posted by sadykadie2 View Post
The picture titled " 1716 N. Western (1964, Joyce Miller)" I believe is from the early 70's. The cars appear to be more from that era
I'm gonna guess 1984 due to the Olympic logo on the sign.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1984_Summer_Olympics

An odd thing about that photo is that the Pinto station wagon is obviously photoshopped into the pic. Weird.
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  #59245  
Old Posted Yesterday, 7:42 AM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post


The image is mirrored! Thanks, CaliNative, that's why I was having trouble recognizing the location. Here's an approximation of the same view today:


Google Maps
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mstimc View Post
So sorry, Cali. My mother was born in 1920 as well and died in 2000. She moved here as a small child and grew up across the street from Echo Park. One of my most cherished possessions is a letter she wrote to her travelling salesman dad about riding out the 1932 earthquake. Its great your mom had a chance to share her stories with you. We can honor them by sharing their stories with others. Take care.
Thank you, Hoss and the others with kind words. In the end she was in pain, so at least she is free. But I can't believe she is gone, but almost 102 years is a long mostly happy life and she saw so many things. From the Roaring Twenties to the Internet Age. She used a tablet computer until her eyes no longer allowed it and her mind began to fade. She enjoyed life until the last few months. A good long life well lived.

Last edited by CaliNative; Yesterday at 9:04 PM.
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  #59246  
Old Posted Yesterday, 7:49 AM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
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Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post
Sincerest condolences CaliNative.
Thank you
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  #59247  
Old Posted Yesterday, 12:31 PM
Lwize Lwize is offline
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  #59248  
Old Posted Yesterday, 9:06 PM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post
Pioneer Chicken and the Egyptian Theater, playing They Only Kill Their Masters,
at Hollywood Blvd. & McCadden Place, 1973.

The film opened in November, 1972. So an early 1973 date with Christmas decorations could be correct.


I wonder if people tried to smuggle chicken into the Egyptian? Nothing like fried chicken, fries, later popcorn, candy and a movie. The ushers were probably told to look for food smugglers, since theaters made most of their profits from the food stand out front.

The street side of the Egyptian is so ordinary and modest. Unless you knew, nobody would suspect a big and famous premier movie palace was there. The Chinese Theater doesn't hide it. Grand even on the street.

Did they premier the 1963 Taylor/Burton film "Cleopatra" at the Egyptian? That film almost bankrupted the studio that produced it...was it MGM? Can't recall.

Another Taylor/ Burton film from that period is much better..."The Sandpiper". Still worth watching. Set in Big Sur, and filmed there. Tells the story of a private school master and minister, Burton, who has an affair with a bohemian artist (Taylor) who has her son enrolled in the school, and all the consequences that ensue. Really captures the mid 1960s feel, in the transition era from the beats to the hippies. A good film.

An even better film with the two is 1967's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolf?", based on an Albee play. Liz is fantastic as Martha, a foul mouthed tenured English Professor's wife in constant real/mock/play battle with her boozing hubby George (Burton) over issues in their long marriage. You can't say George is the henpecked victim, because he can inflict as well as receive pain. In many respects this is Taylor's best acting performance, and Burton shows his acting chops as well. Personally I like the Sandpaper just as much, maybe more. The Big Sur setting is gorgeous and the story is gripping. Watch them both.

"Cleopatra" is just a big sprawling cesspool of a film. Rex Harrison doing Julius Caesar with a British accent is a hoot. Never do you believe for one moment this is Julius Caesar. I almost expect Caesar to blurt out "The Rain in Spain", and Aubrey Hepburn who starred with Rex in "My Fair Lady" might have made a more bewitching Cleopatra than Liz. And come to think of it, Burton as Mark Antony (Marcus Antonius) is unconvincing, just going through the motions. The whole film straddles the camp boundary. The 1930s Cleopatra with Claudette Colbert is better, and mercifully much shorter. You don't feel like you've just wasted 4 hours of your life.

Last edited by CaliNative; Today at 3:09 AM.
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  #59249  
Old Posted Today, 12:15 AM
riichkay riichkay is offline
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I would like to add my condolences to CaliNative on the passing of your mother.


A photo from pinterest.com....




A dapper young fellow and his '65 Ford Galaxie, apparently purchased at Jim Fisk Ford, which was at Manchester Blvd. and Florence Ave. in Inglewood.


I tried enlarging to read the street name, no luck it's just too blurry....our best clue is the Pronto Market sign....this was the chain's Downey location....




I could not turn up a list of all Pronto locations, but in addition to Downey I found references to stores in Pacific Palisades, South Pasadena, Culver City, West Covina, and Garden Grove.  


I'd never heard of the store, turns out they were started by Rexall Drugs as a competitor to 7-Eleven, and were the predecessor to Trader Joe's....excerpt from a history of Trader Joe's....


"Although Trader Joe's was not officially founded until 1967, its origins can be traced back to the Pronto Markets chain of food stores that were started in the late 1950s. Pronto Markets was initiated by the Rexall Drug Co. in 1958. The venture reflected the intent of Rexall, an operator of a chain of drugstores, to get in on the burgeoning convenience and corner food-stand market. Rexall appointed Joe Coulombe to head up the new division. Coulombe was only 26 years old at the time and had been with Rexall for only three years. Nevertheless, his managers were impressed with his performance and believed that he could handle the job. During the late 1950s and early 1960s, Coulombe managed to build Pronto into a chain with a considerable presence in Los Angeles and Orange Counties.

Despite its expansion, Pronto was experiencing growing profit pressures by the mid-1960s as a result of increased competition. Southland Corp.'s successful 7-Eleven chain, in particular, was bearing down on smaller competitors like Pronto and was even planning an aggressive expansion in Pronto's region. Rexall elected in 1966 to jettison its Pronto Markets division and escape the convenience store industry. Coulombe, still at the helm, was faced with a choice--attempt a buyout of the chain that he had built and remain as chief executive, or bail out and look for a new niche in the retail industry. Coulombe took an extended Caribbean vacation before deciding to stick with Pronto. With the financial backing of Bank of America, he purchased Pronto from Rexall and went to work.

Coulombe knew when he bought Pronto that the strategy he had used to grow the business in the past would be ineffective in the face of growing competition. 7-Eleven was targeting his customers, and his organization lacked the resources to compete with the national chain. The ever-innovative Coulombe considered two prevalent social trends as he devised a new marketing scheme. First of all, consumers were becoming increasingly educated and sophisticated, and were expecting more from their shopping experiences. Secondly, the surge in global travel, made possible by plummeting jumbo-jet airfares, was exposing Americans to new foods. Coulombe decided to develop a food store at which well-educated, well-traveled, but not necessarily wealthy, people could buy foods that would impress themselves and their friends. "I wanted to appeal to the well-educated and people who were traveling more," he explained in the October 2, 1989 issue of Forbes, "like teachers, engineers and public administrators. Nobody was taking care of them." Coulombe opened the first Trader Joe's outlet in South Pasadena in 1967--the rest of the Pronto chain would soon become transformed into other Trader Joe's outlets."
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  #59250  
Old Posted Today, 12:22 AM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
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Thank you Riich and thank you Hoss for your condolence message. I tried to reply but not sure if it went through. Anyway, I enjoy your posts here. I will try to post her stories and memories here and on my modest 1920s/30s blog as I get more time. Cheers.

Last edited by CaliNative; Today at 1:09 AM.
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  #59251  
Old Posted Today, 1:40 AM
Noir_Noir Noir_Noir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riichkay View Post

A photo from pinterest.com....




A dapper young fellow and his '65 Ford Galaxie, apparently purchased at Jim Fisk Ford, which was at Manchester Blvd. and Florence Ave. in Inglewood.


I tried enlarging to read the street name, no luck it's just too blurry....our best clue is the Pronto Market sign....this was the chain's Downey location....


Nice work riichkay. You found the location in one.

It is the Pronto Market in Downey - 10846 Downey Ave.

The dapper fellow was parked on 4th Street with the Pronto behind him at the junction with Downey Ave.

The view nowadays with the old Pronto location arrowed.



GSV
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  #59252  
Old Posted Today, 2:06 AM
fullpower fullpower is offline
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Originally Posted by Noir_Noir View Post
Nice work riichkay. You found the location in one.

It is the Pronto Market in Downey - 10846 Downey Ave.

The dapper fellow was parked on 4th Street with the Pronto behind him at the junction with Downey Ave.

The view nowadays with the old Pronto location arrowed.



GSV
with a pick-up truck parked in the same location in both photos.
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  #59253  
Old Posted Today, 3:57 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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CaliNative, I'm so sorry to hear that your mother passed... It should be a great comfort to you that she is no longer in pain.




A mystery pocket park.

The seller believes this is Los Angeles and I tend to agree.


eBay

At first glance there doesn't appear to be many clues but if you closer there are several. . .including a bridge in the far distance.

Hmm. .perhaps the amazingly tall palm tree will help us find the location if it's still alive.

.
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