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  #18461  
Old Posted Yesterday, 8:41 PM
Taeolas Taeolas is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dengler Avenue View Post
I wonder how though. Did people get too complacent? Did people sneak in via the back route QC-289 and N.B.-120? Like, what was it?
There would still be a lot of traffic on the TCH, just naturally for trucking, so Edmundston is basically the Guardian of the Gate for the Maritimes. So it's not surprising that they have an outbreak. The Holiday surge didn't help; sadly the dashboard doesn't give historical data for the traffic counts, but just yesterday there were 1100 commercial vehicles that entered via the TCH.

That "back route" you mentioned IS monitored and tracked; looks like they tend to have about a hundred personal vehicles cross a day, if yesterday's stats are normal.

Edmundston's luck ran out at a bad time, and for whatever reasons they weren't careful and its burning them bad.
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  #18462  
Old Posted Yesterday, 9:06 PM
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Nunavut has a new case today, the first since December 28. However it is in Arviat so it’s likely connected to the previous outbreak there and not a new outbreak.
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  #18463  
Old Posted Yesterday, 11:19 PM
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theman23 theman23 is offline
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Originally Posted by whatnext View Post
BC has also opened three clinics dedicated to helping Covid Longhaulers, so obviously it's not just a speculative condition.

B.C. opens 3 clinics dedicated to recovery for COVID-19 long haulers
Preliminary research shows some patients suffer permanent damage to lungs caused by coronavirus
CBC News · Posted: Jan 22, 2021

Three clinics devoted to helping COVID-19 patients recover from the long-term effects of the disease are now open in B.C.'s Lower Mainland.

The clinics, located at St. Paul's Hospital and Vancouver General Hospital in Vancouver and the Jim Pattison Outpatient Care and Surgery Centre in Surrey, will provide specialized care while also helping doctors learn more about the lingering effects of infection with the novel coronavirus.

"We know some people who recover from COVID-19 experience long-term health effects. Through the dedication of a large team of experts and health leaders across the province, we are working to ensure that specialized care is available to British Columbians, when they need it," Health Minister Adrian Dix said in a news release.

So-called COVID-19 long haulers have reported an array of symptoms that last for months after they've recovered from their illnesses, including shortness of breath, debilitating fatigue, body aches, coughing, loss of taste or smell, joint pain and headaches.

Health officials say an early study conducted by Vancouver General Hospital, St. Paul's Hospital and the University of B.C. found that more than half of hospitalized COVID-19 patients had abnormal breathing tests three months after they became sick, and one in five had permanent lung scarring....


https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/briti...nics-1.5883302
Two clinics in Vancouver? Really? This is starting to become a parody.
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  #18464  
Old Posted Yesterday, 11:51 PM
whatnext whatnext is offline
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Originally Posted by theman23 View Post
Two clinics in Vancouver? Really? This is starting to become a parody.
How so?
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  #18465  
Old Posted Today, 12:02 AM
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theman23 theman23 is offline
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Originally Posted by whatnext View Post
How so?
The majority of covid cases (and BCs population) are not easily served by VGH or SPH. The allocation of health care resources in BC is excessively Vancouver centric.
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  #18466  
Old Posted Today, 12:06 AM
CivicBlues CivicBlues is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theman23 View Post
The majority of covid cases (and BCs population) are not easily served by VGH or SPH.
Except they are.

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  #18467  
Old Posted Today, 12:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theman23 View Post
The majority of covid cases (and BCs population) are not easily served by VGH or SPH. The allocation of health care resources in BC is excessively Vancouver centric.
Maybe they can add one at UBC to mix it up a bit.
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  #18468  
Old Posted Today, 12:33 AM
whatnext whatnext is offline
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WTF, why are flights like this even running if travel is supposed to be limited to "essential"?

Third flight from Haiti lands with many COVID-infected passengers
-Bryan Passifiume 1 day ago

For the third time in 10 days, so many passengers on an Air Transat flight from Port-au-Prince to Montreal tested positive for COVID-19 that Health Canada deemed the entire plane impacted by the virus.

On Wednesday, Health Canada added TS663 — which landed in Montreal on Jan. 17 — to its online list of COVID-impacted flights. Two other flights from Haiti earlier this month — TS663 and TS665 — were deemed to have all rows affected by passengers who subsequently tested positive for the virus.

All three flights used Airbus A330s, capable of holding between 345 and 375 passengers.

Health Canada doesn’t list how many infected people were on each flight....


https://www.msn.com/en-ca/lifestyle/...ehp&li=AAggFp5
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  #18469  
Old Posted Today, 1:07 AM
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The prevalence of the new UK variant has been falling for the last few weeks according to the UK ONS (UK equivalent of Statistics Canada). The rise (imagine the charts cut off at December 25 or so) was the evidence Boris Johnson originally relied on to claim that the new variant was 70% more transmissible, and this led to a bunch of knee-jerk UK-related travel restrictions (while travel is less restricted to the countries that simply don't do sequencing to detect new variants).


https://twitter.com/ONS/status/1352589226878107648
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  #18470  
Old Posted Today, 2:01 AM
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theman23 theman23 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CivicBlues View Post
Except they are.
map
23,000 in Fraser South vs 9,000 in Vancouver. Come again?

Quote:
Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
Maybe they can add one at UBC to mix it up a bit.
Are you being facetious?

It would make more sense to set up clinics in south Surrey, the tri cities, and Abbotsford (in addition to the one at SMH).
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  #18471  
Old Posted Today, 3:11 AM
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Loco101 Loco101 is offline
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
The Maritimes (well New Brunswick mostly) already did that and it seemed to pass muster. So far.
I still can't believe that NB and the other Atlantic provinces have been able to do that for so long. I also don't get why so many still want to see outsiders as the problem when the much bigger cause of spreading originates from people returning home after having visited or working outside of the region.

As I had mentioned before, New Brunswick and Northern Ontario have about the same population. NB has more cases per capita than Northern ON yet Ontario welcomes everyone. Was it really worth it for NB to restrict visitors? Northern Ontario has many people travelling through it form other provinces and Southern Ontario and that hasn't led to outbreaks. Any outbreaks I've heard about originate from someone living here who travelled down South and hung out with people in hot spots then returned home and tested positive.

Interestingly, the region with the lowest COVID cases per capita in all of Ontario is North Bay - Nipissing which has both Highways 17 and 11 (Trans-Canada routes) going through and many people from elsewhere who stop in North Bay at hotels, restaurants, shopping, etc..
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  #18472  
Old Posted Today, 3:49 AM
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Loco101 Loco101 is offline
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Originally Posted by Taeolas View Post
Rough news for New Brunswick.

30 new cases today; we've had very few days under 10 new cases since the new year.
8 in Moncton, which is a bit of a concern but not so much as Edmundston...
1 in Saint John
1 in Freddy/River valley
19 in Edmundston
1 in Miramichi.

MIRAMICHI HAS BEEN BREACHED! MIRAMICHI HAS BEEN BREACHED! After no new cases for the year to date, Miramichi now has a new case. The province is doomed!

More seriously, Edmundston is the story of the day. 19 new case, 129 active cases at the moment. The province has basically declared the virus out of control in the zone, and the zone is now moving into full lockdown for 2 weeks as of Midnight tomorrow (they are giving the zone an extra day since we haven't had a full lockdown since the early days of COVID).

A few days ago here, I mentioned my worry that they were seeing something in the numbers that wasn't publicly announced when they moved Zones 1,2 and 3 to Red. I was worried that Freddy, Moncton and SJ's numbers were going to spike hard; but they've mostly stayed stable and been dropping.

I now believe they did see something, but that something was Edmundston burning up. The big cities were pushed to red (because our numbers while lowish were still a bit of a concern) to free up resources so they could be sent up to Edmundston.

As is, with the trends we're seeing in SJ and Freddy, there are rumblings we might go back orange next week. Moncton's numbers are still a touch high so they may need to stay red a bit longer to try and get them down to under 5 a day basically.

Hopefully Edmundston's lockdown will help fast and we'll see a fast drop in their numbers.
We had 28 active cases in Timmins (population 42,000) two weeks ago and ALL of them have been resolved!! No reported active cases right now!

But the news has been bad further North. The Extendicare long term care facility in Kapuskasing (population 8,200) is having an outbreak with 19 cases among staff and residents and unfortunately one resident, a 93 year old male just died of COVID. I don't believe we've had a death in the region since August of last year. Word is that a worker at that Extendicare location who is a young adult who had been gathering with friends and had travelled during the Christmas/New Years holiday and caught it and unknowingly passed it on at her workplace.

The other outbreak is in Constance Lake First Nation (population 872) near Hearst. There are 12 active cases there.
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  #18473  
Old Posted Today, 5:46 AM
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SkahHigh SkahHigh is offline
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Interesting video explaining the data from Israel and the efficacy of the first dose for the Pfizer/Moderna vaccines by Dr Don Sheppard of McGill University.

Basically, the « 33% efficacy » reported in Israel is in the first 14 days after the first dose is administered and it’s a positive sign, because vaccines don’t usually start working before that period.

https://fb.watch/3bskrM9eTI/
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  #18474  
Old Posted Today, 7:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loco101 View Post
I still can't believe that NB and the other Atlantic provinces have been able to do that for so long. I also don't get why so many still want to see outsiders as the problem when the much bigger cause of spreading originates from people returning home after having visited or working outside of the region.
Our Chief Medical Officer of Health explained our position well.

To our knowledge, we have no community spread. The virus can only move when people move and importation is the only way it can arrive in the province.

We have 16,000 families with at least one parent commuting to work outside the province, most on rotations of a few weeks in mainland Canada, a few weeks home. As they are residents of the province, they should and must be allowed to return. Some of them test positive for coronavirus and this is where we are investing our resources in testing and contact tracing, quarantine enforcement and healthcare, etc. Should we have an outbreak resulting from rotational workers - well, people have to work. That’s easier for Newfoundlanders to accept than having an outbreak because Joe from Ajax wanted to see an iceberg. We are very nearly the most effective in the world at contact tracing and containment. This is why.

The rest of our restrictions are intended to ensure this process continues to work. Every restriction offers an added layer of protection. Most Canadians need a travel exemption to come at all or they are turned back at point of entry. Those with an exemption or residents of the Maritimes are allowed in but need to self isolate for 14 days. This is actually enforced.

If the virus slips through those cracks, we have everything else protecting us - this is why we still have mandatory masks, reduced capacity at indoor public venues, etc. We’ve seen in other provinces how quickly it spreads when any link in that chain is missing. All it takes is one visitor at one hockey game - if they’re allowed to go without self-isolating, if it’s at capacity and not everyone has a mask, if the public transit is full going there, etc. That’s potentially hundreds of cases in a week. Some provinces are allowing that to happen every day. We choose not to do because it’s important for us as a society with very little anonymity to protect ourselves and each other.

Lifting our restrictions won’t just be based on local epidemiology, it’s based on other jurisdictions as well. We know if we allow tourists in, most will come from Ontario and the northeast United States, so we need to see those regions get things under control as well before we open the borders. We also want a sufficient percentage of our population vaccinated, etc. We’re in the home stretch now provided vaccines remain effective long enough to get the virus under control worldwide.
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