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Old Posted Dec 1, 2006, 5:23 PM
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Gibbs Street Pedestrian Bridge | Complete

Tram neighbors pick favorite bridge design
Thursday, November 30, 2006
Fred Leeson
The Oregonian

Standing like a giant modern-art scarecrow, the 195-foot-tall tram tower greets motorists sweeping north on Interstate 5 past the gentle curve at Corbett Avenue.

That iconic view at downtown's portal could have another striking element in three years: a 700-foot-long pedestrian bridge crossing over the freeway between Southwest Kelly Avenue and the burgeoning new South Waterfront condo village. It would be the first overpass to meet motorists' eyes heading into downtown.

As the bridge design unfolds, residents leery of the tram are worried about the span, too: Will there be cost overruns? Will there be money left to improve other traffic snags?

The City Council approved the bridge concept as an accommodation to a neighborhood that vehemently opposed the tram. The council also considered it a step in atoning for past transportation sins.

"In the beginning, there was a neighborhood that was thriving," says John Breshears, an architect for the Zimmer Gunsul Frasca firm designing the bridge. "Slowly, it began to get cut to pieces."

South Portland's street grid started changing with the Ross Island Bridge in 1926. It suffered more damage from Barbur Boulevard, I-5, Interstate 405 and an extension of Naito Parkway. "Slowly but surely, it began to look like a mess," Breshears says.

The bridge won't solve all those problems. But it will allow walkers and bicyclists to safely cross the freeway to reach the Willamette River, the tram and a new park. "It's the first time we're building something for the neighborhood and not for someone else," says Greg Baldwin, a ZGF partner who has studied transportation projects since the early 1970s.

At two public workshops, residents said they prefer an open, airy design with clean lines. Of three proposed designs, the front-runner is a box-girder structure in which slanting triangular girders would sit below the 14-foot-wide deck, leaving the top to be protected by simple screens.

Breshears calls the box-girder model "an exquisite piece of infrastructure" that would complement the tram tower. Residents at a second workshop preferred the box-girder model nearly 2-to-1 over two steel truss structures.

The Portland Design Commission also weighed in with a strong preference for the modernistic design.

But the box-girder bridge is probably the most expensive. Some fear it would eat up most of the $11 million in federal transportation funds. Presumably, anything left could help implement a South Portland Circulation Study aimed at untangling the neighborhood streetscape.

"We don't want the bridge to take all of it," says Jim Gardner, a director of the South Portland Neighborhood Association. "The circulation study is our number one priority, not the bridge."

Baldwin notes that the bridge allocation was never intended to solve all the neighborhood problems. Bill Hoffman, project manager for the Portland Office of Transportation, says, "It's going to be a challenge to get the bridge built for what we have. If we can squeeze more out of it, great."

The City Council is expected to select a bridge design sometime next year. Tentative bridge completion date: 2010.

Fred Leeson: 503-294-5946; fredleeson@news.oregonian.com
http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/o...830.xml&coll=7



detailed rendering here:
http://www.portlandonline.com/shared....cfm?id=136477
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2006, 11:45 PM
zilfondel zilfondel is offline
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Interestingly, the pedestrian bridges in London that traverse busy rail lines and highways do not allow any views except where you are going (along the street or path). Both sides of the bridge are always completely solid, usually up to about 6-8 feet high. At least this is typical of the older 100+ year old steel bridges.
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Old Posted Dec 2, 2006, 12:53 AM
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there was a article about the pedestrian bridge in the inportland section a couple days ago if anyone wants to find it and post/read it. it even has a rendering!
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Old Posted Dec 2, 2006, 1:00 AM
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^hey Dougall, I posted that story and a link to the rendering in the 'SoWa readies for 2006 debut' thread...
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Old Posted Jan 12, 2007, 2:10 AM
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Gibbs Street Pedestrian Bridge | Complete

http://www.portlandonline.com/transp...ex.cfm?c=43035
Quote:
Prospectus review and approval is anticipated to be complete by late summer of 2007 and right-of-way analysis should be completed the following summer. Right-of-way acquisition includes 25 foot easements on the north and south sides of Gibbs on the east side of Interstate 5. Final design and construction documents are projected to be complete by the beginning of 2009. Construction should be from late winter of 2009 to late fall 2010. As the design of the bridge progresses, every effort will be made to accelerate the schedule.

Quote:
Sixty-one attendees completed comment cards and forty-four of these expressed a design option preference:
Option A: Continuous Truss 17
Option B: Simple Truss 1
Option C: Box Girder 30

the LED lighting would be very interesting
Quote:
The following general comments were received:
- incorporate LED lighting
- use pollution absorbing materials, ie. titanium dioxide coating
- provide places to stop and sit on the bridge to rest or look at the view
- opt for low life-cycle maintenance costs; bridge maitenance money is scarce
and some renders:















i like the look out area it has on all of them but i'm going to have to vote for the box girder design
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Old Posted Jan 12, 2007, 2:11 AM
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sorry guys ignore the other one if a mod can delete the other thread that would be great
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  #7  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2007, 6:16 AM
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nice..

definitely option C gets my vote. it seems to be in good keeping with the progressive form of the tram and landings. love or hate them they do really have a nice attention to form. this area could become very active if they could repair the bridgehead of ross island - bike, auto, pedestrian, mass transit.
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Old Posted Jan 14, 2007, 6:28 AM
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box girder, box girder, box girder!

This won't even start until 2009?
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Old Posted Jan 14, 2007, 12:10 PM
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i like option c
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Old Posted Jan 14, 2007, 12:13 PM
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i like option c
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Old Posted Jan 14, 2007, 7:04 PM
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Box girder for sure
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Old Posted Jan 15, 2007, 12:19 AM
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Which design would allow you to enjoy the view walking

Which design would allow you to enjoy the view while walking?

Would the interesting view be above?
Would you be more interested in being shielded from inclement weather?
Would you be in a hurry or thinking about what you need to do that day and merely look straight ahead?
Would any of the designs have a higher maintenance cost in the future?

Just wondering The triangles look pretty cool. They are similar to the triangles in the tower.
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Old Posted Jan 15, 2007, 8:09 AM
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I think all of you can agree, that the renderings show a laughable amount of people on the bridge and ramps, if that many people cross it in a week I would be shocked.
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Old Posted Jan 16, 2007, 3:17 AM
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westsider, that's what it'll look like every day when they bulldoze lair hill and put up a slew of boutiques and starbucks.

Of course people will us it, then!
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Old Posted Jan 16, 2007, 6:19 AM
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Box Girder, although I prefer the continuous truss's switchback to the landing on the Tram Tower. The irregular shape is pretty interesting, and helps reflect the geometry in the rest of the Tram architecture.
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Old Posted Jan 16, 2007, 7:15 PM
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Box Grider gets my vote but I too like the switchback (cantilever effect) of the continuous truss. Maybe the switchback can be used in the Box Grider.


EP
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  #17  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2007, 11:34 PM
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Option C - I like the way it plays up to the existing tower design.
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Old Posted Jan 17, 2007, 6:24 AM
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Box girder + switchback gets my vote, too.
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  #19  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2007, 10:12 PM
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^didn't the neighborhood already agree to option C? Which is also the most expensive option...I've read somewhere that option C was preferred, but the neighborhood is weighing using a cheaper option so they can have more neighborhood improvements from the left over money...in any case...I cast my vote for C.
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Old Posted Jan 18, 2007, 10:15 PM
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i remember that article but i think it just said that they liked C the best, but there were still concerns about the cost of C. so i don't think they have made a final decision yet
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