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  #341  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2018, 8:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Keith P. View Post
The poll illustrates the overall ignorance of the populace. BC has areas with a decent climate but lots of rain in those spots while others are very snowy in the winter and still others are like deserts. The prairies have that same hot/cold split summer to winter while the east coast is a great place to live except for the climate. Interesting that NS is favored by more than 3 times the number of those who favor our neighbor NB. Canada really has no places that have San Diego-like good weather most of the year.
The east coast climate is bad by global standards but good by Canadian standards (and even okay compared to large parts of the US that get too hot in summer). You are right that there is no San Diego. I find that most people on the east coast overestimate how nice the weather is in other parts of Canada. I don't like living in hot summer weather for weeks on end and the stretches of socked-in rain and cloud BC gets in the winter are unreal. Unfortunately even most of the BC interior is very cloudy in winter. Kelowna gets a brutal 35 hours of sun in December on average. People think Halifax is bad and it gets 105 hours.

The bigger factor is that the cost of living in most of Canada has gone through the roof lately. A mediocre condo in Toronto or Vancouver can easily be above $500,000, and renting is precarious in cities with < 1% vacancy rates. I think most young people trying to establish themselves in Vancouver or Toronto right now are making the wrong decision and would have a much higher standard of living in a more affordable city.

The problem with NB is almost all of the growth and opportunity is in larger metropolitan areas. Halifax is borderline. The NB cities are much smaller and don't have as many services to offer.
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  #342  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2018, 9:02 PM
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The problem with NB is almost all of the growth and opportunity is in larger metropolitan areas. Halifax is borderline. The NB cities are much smaller and don't have as many services to offer.
The main problem with NB is that it's by far the most anonymous province in the country. In a survey like this, I'm surprised as many as 4% of the respondents would choose NB as a place to live. This is still double the actual percentage of NB's population within Canada.

If more people actually knew that NB existed, I think our survey results would be even higher........
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  #343  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2018, 9:09 PM
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The problem with NB is almost all of the growth and opportunity is in larger metropolitan areas. Halifax is borderline. The NB cities are much smaller and don't have as many services to offer.
The problem with NB is, as MonctonRad said, it's completely anonymous on the national stage. Anything that NB might be known for stereotypically as an East Coast province is better done by NS/PEI/NFLD. NB excels in nothing of any note that would bring others from across the country to it in favour over its neighbours.

And, as you said, its cities are smaller than Halifax, which cuts most appeal for those coming from larger urban centres elsewhere.

It's an online poll, so it's weight is practically zero, but it's not at all surprising.
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  #344  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2018, 9:19 PM
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When checking the weather this morning on the Weather Network website, they had one of their typical polls, this one entitled: "Other than the current province or territory you live in, where would be your next choice to call home?"

When I clicked on it, I was not surprised to see that British Columbia was #1 on the pie chart at 38%, but I was surprised that #2 was Nova Scotia (13%), followed by Alberta (9%) and PEI (8%).
I think Nova Scotians underestimate the positive image the province (and the Maritimes in general) engenders elsewhere in the country. People see it as a beautiful, livable, friendly, relaxed. Some people might also see it as podunk or poverty-stricken, but I think less and less.

I was on a business call to Toronto recently, and the woman I was talking to asked where I was calling from. When I said "Halifax," she said, "Oh, some some place nicer than here!" (I told her I liked Toronto just fine, but the point was made. Toronto was dull and workaday to her, the east coast represented something almost exotic.)

East coasters themselves are very self-deprecating about the place, to the point of irrational negativity, as we've discussed on this forum. But people who haven't been steeped in that cultural baggage (say it now, "culture of def...") are much quicker to see the positive, even if it is a bit idealized or romanticized.
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  #345  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2018, 10:17 PM
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Oh, I'm fiercely proud of the Maritimes in general (having lived in all three provinces), and firmly believe the region is one of the best places to live in the country.

This however doesn't take away the fact that NB is nearly completely anonymous in the rest of the country.

PEI = Anne of Green Gables & the Cradle of Confederation
NS = Halifax & the Bluenose
NB = ???? (in the Canadian imagination)
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  #346  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2018, 10:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Drybrain View Post
East coasters themselves are very self-deprecating about the place, to the point of irrational negativity, as we've discussed on this forum. But people who haven't been steeped in that cultural baggage (say it now, "culture of def...") are much quicker to see the positive, even if it is a bit idealized or romanticized.
Culture of defeat is true, but I think it stems from a larger culture of negativity here. The news media deserves much of the blame for that, I think, by giving every activist, every victim real or otherwise, every person with an axe to grind a platform. It is seen in things like the planning conference underway this week where all of the social media about it was basically "we should do THIS (whatever the THIS may be) because what we have now is so awful".

Now, I have been a constant critic of HRM and the many things they waste money on, and also have been a long-time skeptic of the usefulness of urban planning as practiced here. But recently I had occasion to check out Durham, NC, which is not too much different in population than Halifax. It is the home of Duke University, part of the Research Triangle area around Raleigh, and I expected much of what I had seen in similar southern cities, a vibrant streetscape, a bustling downtown, etc.

While there is a lot of economic activity and development going on, and there are pockets of lovingly-restored old buildings that put many of ours to shame, the city was hit hard by the decline of the tobacco industry and a lot of the property in the older part of the city that was devoted to that for warehouses, factories, etc. still lies dormant with run-down old housing still found nearby. In addition they seemed to have undergone some extensive but very poorly executed urban renewal in the '80s or '90s that was astoundingly bad. Lots of parking structures with no presence at all at street level, or surface parking lots servicing industrial-park style office buildings set well back from the street that got nice brick-and-iron fencing next to the sidewalk but which are still parking lots. The downtown also has a surprising number of 1960s single-floor commercial buildings with drive-up access and surface parking. The older buildings in downtown have a mix of the usual restaurants, boutiques and cafes but many if not more are either vacant and run-down or used by low-end commercial like tattoo parlors or head shops. I was astounded by how poorly it came off. We gripe about car-oriented development here but Halifax is a shining star in that regard by comparison, yet we seldom seem to hear that kind of thing.

Last edited by Keith P.; Mar 4, 2018 at 2:36 PM.
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  #347  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2018, 11:32 PM
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I have lived in Toronto, Moncton, Vancouver and Halifax. I currently live in central Florida. I sell relocation (moving) to people across the continent. I find there is a lot of my customers moving to the Maritimes these days from all across Canada - They are tired of the high prices in other parts of the country and so are moving east. I have traveled the whole continent and I feel that Halifax is the NICEST small city in North America; when I mention that I have seldom if ever had anybody disagree. Most people LOVE the city and rave about it.
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  #348  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2018, 10:50 PM
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  #349  
Old Posted Jun 8, 2018, 12:07 AM
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Will be interesting to see the total numbers. I know there are a lot of older people moving back to/to Halifax as well.

EDIT: Also interesting is a lot of sources site Halifax's population at ~403k for 2016 but statscan puts it at ~425 for 2016 and ~432 for 2017. Must be due to different calculation areas?
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  #350  
Old Posted Jun 8, 2018, 4:02 PM
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EDIT: Also interesting is a lot of sources site Halifax's population at ~403k for 2016 but statscan puts it at ~425 for 2016 and ~432 for 2017. Must be due to different calculation areas?
The annual population estimates are corrected for the census undercount. That is the source of the difference. They use the latest census boundaries.
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  #351  
Old Posted Jun 9, 2018, 2:08 AM
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It's come up before but it's also interesting to note that Hants County is borderline in terms of being included in the Halifax CMA. A lot of people commute from Hants to Halifax. The Windsor and Enfield areas are quasi suburbs.

The commuter shed is probably already around 500,000 or so. The CMA boundaries just don't match that area very well because of how the census divisions are drawn up. Ecum Secum's included because it's in one large district that encompasses suburban Dartmouth plus a huge area to the east. North of the city the census divisions are more compact because the population densities are higher.

I'm not sure how likely it is that the CMA boundaries will be updated in 2021. This would depend on the commuting trend in Hants. I'd imagine it's going up though. If the last 2 years are representative and there are no adjustments to the boundaries the CMA will cross the half a million mark in about a decade. With adjustments that would happen 5 or 6 years from now.
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  #352  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2018, 5:00 AM
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Record low apartment vacancy rate:
https://signalhfx.ca/apartment-vacan...it-record-low/

This is good news in that it will mean that more rental projects will move forward. Hopefully the city will keep on top of this though, adding lots of new supply and making sure the new supply goes to the right areas. Some other Canadian cities are in a rental crisis with < 1% vacancy rates.
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  #353  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2018, 4:57 PM
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Record low apartment vacancy rate:
https://signalhfx.ca/apartment-vacan...it-record-low/

This is good news in that it will mean that more rental projects will move forward. Hopefully the city will keep on top of this though, adding lots of new supply and making sure the new supply goes to the right areas. Some other Canadian cities are in a rental crisis with < 1% vacancy rates.
Great news! I've been really happy to see how many residents are not only moving to Halifax but also how many are staying here. It seems like recently there have been a lot more people from Asia choosing Halifax as their home instead of just coming here for university.

In regards to rentals I think there are quite a few buildings that will be able to be occupied soon. I know that close to where my house is in Rockingham South there are 5 buildings that are nearing completion each with ~90+ units. I hope we get to see more dense developments which will also help with the transportation issue as well.
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  #354  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2018, 8:12 PM
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Great news! I've been really happy to see how many residents are not only moving to Halifax but also how many are staying here. It seems like recently there have been a lot more people from Asia choosing Halifax as their home instead of just coming here for university.

In regards to rentals I think there are quite a few buildings that will be able to be occupied soon. I know that close to where my house is in Rockingham South there are 5 buildings that are nearing completion each with ~90+ units. I hope we get to see more dense developments which will also help with the transportation issue as well.
One of my son's best friends is a real estate agent whose entire business/clientele is dedicated to Asian immigrants looking to move here and buy a home.
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  #355  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2018, 9:03 PM
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One of my son's best friends is a real estate agent whose entire business/clientele is dedicated to Asian immigrants looking to move here and buy a home.
Better get some RE laws done up quick before your prices sky-rocket.
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  #356  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2018, 10:46 PM
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Better get some RE laws done up quick before your prices sky-rocket.
It's an interesting thing to think about. Halifax naturally has a much more elastic supply of housing because there is so much cheap developable land nearby. However, it tends to be planned in a pretty heavy-handed way and the municipal government tends to move at the leisurely pace of a small town. The Centre Plan has been in the works for, what, a decade or so?

I don't think it's far-fetched to imagine a situation where Halifax real estate prices go up a lot because not enough new housing is approved. There may even be pressure to create this situation artificially because it benefits existing homeowners. If this happens it will hobble the growth of the city and hurt a lot of younger people and newcomers.
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  #357  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2018, 11:02 PM
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I have said so many times that the Federal Government needs to set up a national policy, rather than just have city vs city and province vs province deal with the same influx and market manipulation. Montreal is in it now and most people there think nothing of it and refuse to listen to people from Vancouver or Toronto who tell them to put tough rules in place now, and not wait until its too late. But that buzzing real estate market is so appealing to the ones who profit from it, so nobody wants to slow down the train.

I would have a totally different opinion of Justin Trudeau if he took initiative and made tight real estate rules and foreign buyer laws national, but won't happen
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  #358  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2018, 1:45 PM
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Nova Scotia grew by 10,319 in one year!



https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1...pid=1710000901

Maritimes 1,891,681 Q4 2018
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  #359  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2018, 2:33 PM
IanWatson IanWatson is offline
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Here it is sorted by percentage:

Nunavut.....................................2.32
Prince Edward Island..................2.16
Ontario.......................................1.82
Alberta.......................................1.59
Canada.......................................1.44
British Columbia.........................1.43
Yukon.........................................1.39
Manitoba....................................1.20
Quebec......................................1.10
Nova Scotia...............................1.08
Saskatchewan............................0.94
New Brunswick...........................0.52
Newfoundland and Labrador.....(0.64)
Northwest Territories...............(1.45)
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  #360  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2018, 2:06 AM
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Nova Scotia grew by 10,319 in one year!



https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1...pid=1710000901

Maritimes 1,891,681 Q4 2018
90% of it in the last six months!
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