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  #46901  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2020, 11:58 AM
marothisu marothisu is offline
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The caterer we used for our wedding has their office at Damen & Lake. Had not been over there in a long time but we had our tasting there in the late spring before the wedding. Things in that area looked a bit nicer than the last time I had been there. Definitely was being upgraded. After the tasting, we had walked over to the Goose Island Taproom and noticed a handful of other breweries over there as well as a distillery nearby. Was surprised how busy these places were on a Friday at 5pm in that area. It reminded us a little bit of a less built up version of where we currently live in Long Island City in NYC (Queens - close to Brooklyn). Our block is all luxury high rise apartments and condos, but a block away turns pretty industrial and there are still those businesses that operate there who haven't been priced out yet somehow. We have a few breweries pretty close too as well as art stuff (not mainstream commercial galleries) operating. The industrial part of this area in Chicago reminds me of the industrial part of a block or two from where we live except the part in Chicago has even more breweries.

To be quite honest, I could totally see that area filling in as long as those breweries and a few of the other businesses aren't priced out. I think that is a big draw to some people as well as having a small music venue like Cobra Lounge pretty close and a good restaurant like Eden right there. Other great restaurants like Elske and Loyalist are close too with other places like Kaiser Tiger. The area in a way kind of has conditions you'd see in "freshly up and coming parts of Brooklyn" to it. You have a handful of breweries and a few art organizations, and attract people to live close by because of that. I could see it at first attracting people in their 30s who aren't going out all the time, but want some options around - and the green line stop will make it easy for people to just go to Halsted pretty quickly if they don't want to hop in a car (uber, lyft, or otherwise)

Will be interesting to see what happens but with the West Loop/Fulton Market boom pushing west and filling in to Ashland, there's no reason that it can't continue to Damen. The area already has things that would attract some more people to live there IMO.The green line station will just make it much easier IMO, but things will probably fill in around Ashland first.
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  #46902  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2020, 2:49 PM
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* Moderator Edit *

Aon Center discussion moved to the Aon Center thread: https://forum.skyscraperpage.com/sho...d.php?t=154966
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  #46903  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2020, 3:55 PM
west-town-brad west-town-brad is offline
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Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Will be interesting to see what happens but with the West Loop/Fulton Market boom pushing west and filling in to Ashland, there's no reason that it can't continue to Damen. The area already has things that would attract some more people to live there IMO.The green line station will just make it much easier IMO, but things will probably fill in around Ashland first.
I think the breweries over there are trying to brand themselves as the Brewer's District or some such. Which is kinda cool.

One big reason the development will be constrained in the area is that it's a very large PMD. Breweries allowed, residential is not aside from the limited grandfathered buildings that exist.
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  #46904  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2020, 4:24 PM
west-town-brad west-town-brad is offline
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the western ave development boom continues, as reported by Block 'Development' Club Chicago:

https://blockclubchicago.org/2020/02...to-california/
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  #46905  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2020, 5:35 PM
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Originally Posted by west-town-brad View Post
the western ave development boom continues, as reported by Block 'Development' Club Chicago:

https://blockclubchicago.org/2020/02...to-california/
Car Town Inc by Harry Carmichael, on Flickr

Car Town Inc by Harry Carmichael, on Flickr
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  #46906  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2020, 6:30 PM
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  #46907  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2020, 6:58 PM
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Funny you mention this. The parcel at the NW corner of Damen/Lake went up for sale in June, but as of this Saturday, the sign on-site indicated that it's already been sold.

https://www.crexi.com/properties/222...eet-chicago-il

I wonder if some developer is planning a more intensive development there? $16M is a pretty high price to pay if you're just gonna lease out a few single-story bow truss buildings... with the PMD zoning there, though, you can only do office.

Also, CTA just edited the routing of the California bus so folks in Logan and Humboldt can now ride to a direct Green Line connection instead of going to the Blue Line. That should throw a little more fuel on the fire of the Lake St/Fulton corridor...
Interesting. The asking price does seem high...big site though. I agree doesn’t seem like they intend on keeping the existing buildings. If office can survive this far west it’d mean great things are happening in Chicago.

The downtown office market is centralizing around the river though. Not sure how viable of an office market this is in the short term, even for start-ups/tech companies. Even with the Damen station up and running (hopefully) next year, it’s still very isolated.
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  #46908  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2020, 7:49 PM
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Interesting. The asking price does seem high...big site though. I agree doesn’t seem like they intend on keeping the existing buildings. If office can survive this far west it’d mean great things are happening in Chicago.

The downtown office market is centralizing around the river though. Not sure how viable of an office market this is in the short term, even for start-ups/tech companies. Even with the Damen station up and running (hopefully) next year, it’s still very isolated.
totally not scientific, but I have noticed a LOT more people exiting at the Morgan station in the mornings - not from the outbound platform, which would suggest downtown residents or North Siders, but from the inbound platform - residents of Pilsen, LV, and the Near West Side. It bodes well for future growth at Damen.

I think Ashland/Lake is an even stronger location for office since it has two train lines instead of one, plus Ashland bus to the North Side, and the new revisions to the PMD include a carveout for new midrises at that exact spot.
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  #46909  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2020, 9:45 PM
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Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
I think Ashland/Lake is an even stronger location for office since it has two train lines instead of one, plus Ashland bus to the North Side, and the new revisions to the PMD include a carveout for new midrises at that exact spot.
Flashback about 17 years or so, but the idea of a secondary office district along Ashland from Lake to the Ike/Medical District basically summarizes the more compelling vision of the Circle Line as an integrated land use and transportation initiative (as opposed to the "avoid riding all the way downtown with the ease of only transferring at least twice" pitch that ended up guiding the weak demand modeling and project descriptions). The whole thing only worked as something more than just a CTA project, seeing as the full value of the concept only becomes feasible with Metra connections (both UP branches, MD, BNSF, RI) making the Ashland corridor a two-seat ride from the entire region along with, of course, supportive zoning from the municipality.
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  #46910  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2020, 9:45 PM
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^Somebody call Mike with American Pickers to save that sign!
There's no doubt somebody is saving that sign. No way something like that gets thrown in a scrap heap in 2020.
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  #46911  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2020, 11:48 PM
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Flashback about 17 years or so, but the idea of a secondary office district along Ashland from Lake to the Ike/Medical District basically summarizes the more compelling vision of the Circle Line as an integrated land use and transportation initiative (as opposed to the "avoid riding all the way downtown with the ease of only transferring at least twice" pitch that ended up guiding the weak demand modeling and project descriptions). The whole thing only worked as something more than just a CTA project, seeing as the full value of the concept only becomes feasible with Metra connections (both UP branches, MD, BNSF, RI) making the Ashland corridor a two-seat ride from the entire region along with, of course, supportive zoning from the municipality.
Yes, the idea that you could "bypass downtown" on a Circle Line and head back out only makes sense to people who've never had to make a rail transfer in other cities. I think a lot of us recognized back then that for the new line to make sense as an investment, we'd have to do some serious upzoning along the corridor - which seemed crazy.

Now, of course, it doesn't seem so crazy that professionals might live and work in dense nodes outside of downtown.
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  #46912  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2020, 3:02 PM
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There's no doubt somebody is saving that sign. No way something like that gets thrown in a scrap heap in 2020.
Eric Nordstrom at Urban Remains posted that he was over there documenting the building yesterday. Parts of the sign has already been pulled down allegedly for restoration. There's been conflicting information as to whether the sign would remain local or end up in a collection in another state.
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  #46913  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2020, 4:16 PM
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Eric Nordstrom at Urban Remains posted that he was over there documenting the building yesterday. Parts of the sign has already been pulled down allegedly for restoration. There's been conflicting information as to whether the sign would remain local or end up in a collection in another state.
a good chunk of it was sold to a restaurant in California
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  #46914  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2020, 4:24 PM
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Dearborn and Harrison

There was a soil testing rig on the parking lot at the southeast corner of Dearborn and Harrison yesterday. The middle portion of this parking lot was sold in 2018 for $2,000,000.
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  #46915  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2020, 5:19 PM
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a good chunk of it was sold to a restaurant in California
Boooo how dare they boast a temperate climate AND steal our charm you can't have it all Cali!
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  #46916  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2020, 5:54 PM
IrishIllini IrishIllini is offline
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I genuinely hate the circle line.
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  #46917  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2020, 6:49 PM
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Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
Yes, the idea that you could "bypass downtown" on a Circle Line and head back out only makes sense to people who've never had to make a rail transfer in other cities. I think a lot of us recognized back then that for the new line to make sense as an investment, we'd have to do some serious upzoning along the corridor - which seemed crazy.

Now, of course, it doesn't seem so crazy that professionals might live and work in dense nodes outside of downtown.
I, for one, didn't think it seemed crazy then. Chicago used to predict the future and build for it. Sometimes the future changed by the time we were done building (Deep Tunnel/TARP, I'm looking at you), but we took the "make no small plans" thing pretty seriously. Today it seems like everyone is afraid to make big proposals in the public sphere. We get a few ambitious private plans (The 78, Lincoln Yards) or "public/private partnership" things (Millennium Park, that nonsense between Soldier Field and the South Loop), but when's the last time the City really aggressively pursued a generationally big infrastructure project? CREATE might meet the definition, but it seems to move so slowly. It's known to be needed, and needed to help maintain Chicago's dominance in transshipment and rail, two things we need and want to keep around, but for an amount that's relatively affordable for what it gives us, it's just slowly being done piecemeal. Rebuilding the Pink Line, Green Line, and Dan Ryan branch, extending the Brown Line platforms, the Red Line extension to 130th, and the Belmont Flyover are all important and add value, but aren't really fundamentally changing anything about how Chicago works. The Circle Line would have fundamentally changed Chicago's concept of the Central Area. But a truly grand plan would be even bigger than that. Chicago hasn't had a truly revolutionary transit plan since the 1968 plan that included moving the Loop into a subway and adding subways under Monroe and between Streeterville and McCormick Place. At the time that was proposed, the City saw the future - they saw a time when the West Loop, Streeterville and the South Loop were all going to be big, active parts of greater downtown and need better-than-bus connectivity. But then Chicago lost its mojo for a while and hasn't really gotten it fully back.

Don't get me wrong, I'm very glad that the City has still focused on maintaining what we have and making incremental improvements. While smaller and less extensive, pound for pound, I think the CTA rail system is better than New York's.

And I know budgets are tight and pensions at the City and State level are threatening to turn everything in the state into a budgetary nuclear winter.

But. Still.

Chicago still needs that Monroe/Streeterville/McCormick Place plan - now more than ever. Current plans in Chicago would really benefit from the Circle Line, too. The West Loop Transportation Center was proposed and then promptly shelved as unviable politically and economically, basically also pulling a Clinton Street subway off the table. Electrification of additional Metra lines gets mumbled about occasionally but generally ignored, despite the fact it would really help improve air quality downtown if we stopped running dozens and dozens of huge diesel engines in and out of downtown every day. The City built out a station under Block 37 but their only idea for the connection was a train to O'Hare and without that the station sits wastefully vacant despite the fact that connecting the Red and Blue Lines opens up some potentially interesting routing options. The Dearborn Subway also still has a stub at Lake Street to accommodate a Lake Street subway - that could be activated to send the Green Line underground under the Loop and to the State Street subway and then back up south of Roosevelt, freeing up space on the Loop. There are also portals next to the Blue Line's Congress subway portals at Halsted that could be put to use.

Ultimately, I'd love to see the City say, "Hey, our downtown is growing like crazy. To accommodate what has happened, and facilitate even greater future growth, we're going to:"

1) Change the Orange Line connection to the Loop by building tracks north through the 78 to connect to the Loop at Wells/VanBuren, with new stations at Cermak, Roosevelt and 18th and one in between. $350 million

2) Extend Lower Michigan Ave from Grand Ave to Lake Shore Drive at Oak Street. Do this as part of the LSD rebuild and lakeshore reconstruction being planned. Create a Lower Chicago Ave from just west of Orleans to just west of Fairbanks and implement real BRT for Chicago Ave west of the River to Kedzie. And turn both into bus-only. $225 million (if done as part of an LSD/Lakefront rebuild project)

3) Turn Carroll Street into a proper transitway, connecting to Lower Michigan and making some collection of streets between the east end of Carroll to Navy Pier transit-only, while making transitways in downtown all for dedicated electric buses. Connect the Carroll street transitway to a "bus subway" level in the West Loop Transportation Center, and make parts of Kingsbury bus-only, with dedicated (and enforced) lanes in segments with shared traffic. I want to make these rail streetcars, but unless we can make it a dedicated ROW the whole way, they are useless if they get stuck in traffic. $75 million.

4) Build the West Loop/Streeterville/McCormick Place circulator subway from the Medical district (Ogden/Western) and extend the Streeterville branch from the Hancock west to Clark, then initially north to Armitage but eventually with the goal of going north to Wilson under Broadway, and the south branch extending to 35th Street along the Lake. Can place a yard on railyard land near Western/Ogden. It's 11.5 miles of subway for Ogden/Western, Clark/Armitage, 35th/lakefront routings and roughly 23 stations. Initial cost for those segments, $6.75 billion. Extension to Wilson, $2 billion.

5) Build the West Loop Transportation Center, specifically including a Clinton Street Subway under Halsted from Clybourn to Division then under Kingsbury to Larrabee, then jogging over the Clinton. Then that jogs west to Halsted south of Congress, continuing to 40th, with future plans to extend it east eventually joining Woodlawn to serve Hyde Park, terminating at 63rd. And a subway busway for buses as originally proposed. Initial WLTC plus Clinton Subway going from Halsted/Clybourn to Halsted/40th and a rail yard at 40th: $7.25 billion. Extension east and south to Hyde Park $3.25 billion.

6) Build the Circle Line with the north end far enough north to serve Lincoln Yards (Cortland and Elston) then going east under Armitage Ave to join the north Branch of the West Loop/Streeterville/McCormick lines, and the southwest edge not joining the Orange Line, but following Bubbly Creek to 35th, then a subway to the Lakefront, joining the south end of the West Loop/Streeterville/McCormick subway. So piggy-backing off the circulator. $5 billion.

7) Extend Brown Line to Blue Line. Transfer only, no interlining. $1.5 billion

8) Elevate Brown Line from Western to west of Kedzie, then transition to subway for extension to Blue. Expand yard. $750 million

8) Stations no further apart than 1 mile - 1/2 mile being the target distance for each line - and then DX-16 zoning within 1/4 mile of every station and some sort of at least -4 zoning within 1/4 and 1/2 mile, and an outright ban on new SFH construction within a mile of any new station (or a $1 million tax on any new SFH within a mile of new stations so the really rich can have their cake if they want, while helping pay for the subways). Create a transit-TIF. Free to pass the laws.

Total additions to the system:
~71 stations over ~38 miles (2 stations on existing track, so average of about 1 new station per 1/2 mile of new track)

Total initial costs, without ultimate extensions, rounded up to nearest billion:
$21.9 billion

Total extensions:
$5.25 billion

Financing cost 66.7% financed for 30 years @3%: $9.375 billion

Total long-term costs:
$36.525 billion

Land area within 1/4 mile of new stations (38 stations*.125 square miles):
4.75 square miles

Land area within 1/2 mile of new stations, net of the area 1/4 mile (38 stations *(.5-.125) square miles):
14.25 square miles

Revenue:
Estimated homes within 1/2 mile of new stations, pre-investment: 120,000. Post-investment: 180,000

Estimated increase in property tax revenue from existing homes via appreciation and/or special district: $500
Estimated increase in property tax revenue from new homes: $3,000

Annual property tax residential revenue: (120,000*$500)+(60,000*$3,000)= $240 million per year
Annual retail/commercial property tax revenue (estimated 38 million square feet of space, retail, office, warehouse, etc): $450 million

Total new revenue per year, at completion: $690 million

35-year collection: $24.15 billion
Estimated State contribution: 20% of total $27.15 billion = $5.43 billion
Estimated Federal contribution: 20% of total $27.15 billion = $5.43 billion

Total state, Federal, and property tax collections @35 years:
$35.01 billion

Net unfinanced cost to come from other sources: $1.515 billion or, over 35 years, $43.29 million per year in unfinanced cost.

So for lack of less than $50 million/year, the CTA is making little plans.
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  #46918  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2020, 9:24 PM
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  #46919  
Old Posted Feb 13, 2020, 6:57 PM
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I love emathias's, "But. Still. . . . . . ." Well thought out and expressed; and I agree with most of it, including the current efforts directed at good repair, station expansion, etc. But I also realize that most of the rest of what's suggested is beyond fiscal and political reality. But, as a transit person for a good chunk of my career, it would be interesting to know to what degree planning agencies and the RTA/CTA are adequately funded and honestly, seriously examining the future of the city and its transit vs. the rather tame info we get that generally trickles out from them.
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  #46920  
Old Posted Feb 14, 2020, 5:39 PM
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https://blockclubchicago.org/2020/02...nprofits-plan/



Quote:
LITTLE VILLAGE — After raising $2 million over the last year and a half, a Little Village-based nonprofit is on track with its plan to convert an abandoned library into an office and community space on Cermak Road.

Latinos Progresando, a nonprofit that provides legal aid for immigrants, has raised 80 percent of the funding for a planned adaptive reuse of the old Marshall Square Library building at 2724 W. Cermak Rd.

The community development group, which works on a range of issues including immigration, health, peace and education, wants to convert the former library into a new office, with space for their legal services and the community by next year.

As part of the plan, the 10,000 square foot area will have legal services on the first floor, with offices for the organizations’ various initiatives as part of the Marshall Square Resource Network. The second floor will include conference rooms and a larger space for “community-wide programming,” Gutierrez said.

Esperanza Health System will provide mental health services and work with nearby schools, while the Lincoln Park Zoo will expand its nature-based educational work at nearby schools on the Southwest Sides. Gutierrez said he believes the project will enhance and “deepen their programming” in the neighborhood.

Currently located at 3047 W. Cermak Road, the nonprofit expects to move its offices into the new building dubbed the Latinos Progresando Community Center by spring 2021.



Latinos Progresando is working with Canopy / Architecture + Design.
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