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Old Posted Mar 26, 2020, 4:14 PM
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Mountain West 2019 Metropolitan Area Population Estimates

Here are the latest estimates for metropolitan areas in our region (Areas over 100,000 people). Where an area is covered by a CSA, I have included that estimate instead of the various MSA's that make up the CSA. If part of the city's metropolitan area in outside of our region, I did not include it (ex. Coeur d'Alene):

Denver-Aurora CSA.....2010: 3,090,955.....2019: 3,617,927.....Increase: 526,932/17%

Salt Lake-Provo-Orem CSA.....2010: 2,271,704.....2019: 2,641,048.....Increase: 369,344/16.3%

Albuquerque-Santa Fe CSA.....2010: 1,123,721.....2019: 1,158,464.....Increase: 34,743/3.1%

Boise-Mtn. Home-Ontario CSA.....2010: 697,544.....2019: 831,235.....Increase: 133,691/19.2%

Colorado Springs MSA.....2010: 645,612.....2019: 745,791.....Increase: 100,179/15.5%

Ft. Collins MSA.....2010: 299,360.....2019: 356,899.....Increase: 57,269/19.1%

Idaho Falls-Rexburg-Blackfoot CSA.....2010: 229,721.....2019: 251,347.....Increase: 21,626/9.4%

Pueblo-Canon City CSA.....2010: 205,891.....2019: 216,263.....Increase:
10,372/5%

Billings MSA.....2010: 167,165.....2019: 181,667.....Increase: 14,502/8.7%

St. George MSA.....2010: 138,115.....2019: 177,556.....Increase: 39,441/28.6%

Grand Junction MSA.....2010: 146,733.....2019: 154,210.....Increase: 7,477/5.1%

Logan MSA.....2010: 125,442.....2019: 142,165.....Increase: 16,723/13.3%

Missoula MSA.....2010: 109,296.....2019: 119,600.....Increase: 10,304/9.4%

Twin Falls MSA.....2010: 99,956.....2019: 111,290.....Increase: 11,694/11.7%
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  #2  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2020, 7:21 PM
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Why are no people (relatively speaking) moving to Albuquerque?
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Old Posted Mar 27, 2020, 3:34 AM
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Why are no people (relatively speaking) moving to Albuquerque?
High crime and no jobs.
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Old Posted Mar 27, 2020, 1:44 PM
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Why are no people (relatively speaking) moving to Albuquerque?
Breaking Bad.
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Old Posted Mar 27, 2020, 10:09 PM
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Originally Posted by rds70 View Post
Here are the latest estimates for metropolitan areas in our region (Areas over 100,000 people). Where an area is covered by a CSA, I have included that estimate instead of the various MSA's that make up the CSA. If part of the city's metropolitan area in outside of our region, I did not include it (ex. Coeur d'Alene):
Thanks for the effort to post all that.

This really shows the growth of the Mountain West and how in-migration has substantially benefited from the Bay Area and from California companies, both tech and non-tech, fleeing their repressive business environment.

I'm also going to assume that migration from the Rust Belt and the NE to the south and SW will continue.

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Originally Posted by bunt_q View Post
Breaking Bad.


Santa Fe is a cool place. But the fastest growing area is to the south along the border where trade happens. https://ustr.gov/map/state-benefits/nm
Quote:
The state’s largest market was Mexico. New Mexico exported $1.4 billion in goods to Mexico in 2018, representing 39 percent of the state’s total goods exports.
New Mexico also exports their agriculture products (like Chile peppers) and guessing many of the immigrants ignore the census.
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Old Posted Mar 31, 2020, 3:07 PM
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Originally Posted by wrendog View Post
Why are no people (relatively speaking) moving to Albuquerque?
No offense to my New Mexicans (I lived there for 6 years), but have you been to Albuquerque?
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Old Posted Mar 31, 2020, 5:26 PM
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I'm curious as to what were some of the challenges SFTransplant?

Looking at the percentage, If The Wasatch Front holds to the same percent increase then it will be on track to reach over 3 million next ten year go around. I wish I could see into the future at what Salt Lake's skyline will look like then. Given the transformation these past ten years, I imagine it will be a very beautiful, dense and vibrant downtown. Hopefully, the boom will continue after this pandemic.
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Old Posted Mar 31, 2020, 5:48 PM
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The Salt Lake-Provo-Orem CSA includes all of the Salt Lake, Provo, and Ogden MSAs, correct?
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  #9  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2020, 5:49 PM
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St. George MSA.....2010: 138,115.....2019: 177,556.....Increase: 39,441/28.6%

So much growth going on down here!
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  #10  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2020, 7:30 PM
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The Salt Lake-Provo-Orem CSA includes all of the Salt Lake, Provo, and Ogden MSAs, correct?
Yeah, I think he just forgot to put Ogden in the title mix.
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Old Posted Mar 31, 2020, 8:42 PM
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The Salt Lake-Provo-Orem CSA includes all of the Salt Lake, Provo, and Ogden MSAs, correct?
It includes Weber County, as well.
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  #12  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2020, 8:46 PM
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Yeah, I think he just forgot to put Ogden in the title mix.
The official Consolidated Statistical Area name only includes SLC, Provo and Orem, not Ogden.

I have never understood the naming convention the Office of Management and Budget uses, which is reflected in the Census designations.

Like Denver-Aurora CSA. It would make more sense for it to be the Denver-Boulder-Greeley CSA. Those are the three MSA's that make up the CSA.
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Old Posted Mar 31, 2020, 9:42 PM
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Albuquerque has been doing quite well lately and its growth will pick up. The Census Bureau has revised its population estimates upward in the latter part of the 2010s and no longer shows population losses due to domestic migration.

You all can laugh and trash Albuquerque all you want but it will return to form in growing quickly this coming decade. All signs are pointing to that being true.

Billions in private investment, thousands of new jobs, especially in tech, and thousands of new residential units and hotel rooms added or under construction. The nation's first Gold standard BRT line, a downtown soccer stadium, TopGolf and many other new attractions and amenities, etc.

Sandia National Labs and Intel alone have hired over 3,000 people in the last two years.

Netflix and NBCUniversal have both created production hubs in Albuquerque with a combined 2,000 jobs created and $1.5 billion in direct spending on productions promised. That most recently has caused Stranger Things to move production and filming from Atlanta to Albuquerque. Thank God for Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul!

Albuquerque may have slowed down in suburban growth but the past decade saw urban growth like never before.

But the suburban growth is picking up with all the new jobs. This year is slated to have the largest number of new homes built since before the Great Recession.
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Old Posted Mar 31, 2020, 10:09 PM
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Originally Posted by TakeFive View Post
Thanks for the effort to post all that.

This really shows the growth of the Mountain West and how in-migration has substantially benefited from the Bay Area and from California companies, both tech and non-tech, fleeing their repressive business environment.

I'm also going to assume that migration from the Rust Belt and the NE to the south and SW will continue.




Santa Fe is a cool place. But the fastest growing area is to the south along the border where trade happens. https://ustr.gov/map/state-benefits/nm

New Mexico also exports their agriculture products (like Chile peppers) and guessing many of the immigrants ignore the census.
Wrong. The fastest growing area in the state is the Oil Patch in southeastern New Mexico, due to the oil boom. Hobbs, Clovis, Carlsbad, etc. Las Cruces isn't growing any faster than Albuquerque right now. Hobbs was the 14th-fastest growing micropolitan area between 2018 and 2019 with the tenth largest numerical gain. Sandoval County in metro Albuquerque is still the largest in terms of numerical growth of counties in the state and 5th in percentage. Bernalillo County was 3rd in numerical gain and 11th in percentage. Valencia County was 8th in numerical gain and 7th in percentage. Doña Ana County was 4th in numerical gain and 8th in percentage. That means that it is behind at least two metro Albuquerque counties in either numerical or percentage growth. Las Cruces and the border counties are not the fastest growing areas in the state.

Edit: as for your link, do you realize that New Mexico's largest manufacturing export category of computer and electronics products is almost entirely made up of products made at Intel in metro Albuquerque? There are various other manufacturers in Albuquerque that make up that category as well, but the majority of it is Intel. Very little of that happens outside of metro Albuquerque or northern New Mexico (Los Alamos and Santa Fe).

Last edited by ABQalex; Mar 31, 2020 at 10:33 PM.
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Old Posted Apr 1, 2020, 12:17 AM
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The official Consolidated Statistical Area name only includes SLC, Provo and Orem, not Ogden.
So, the Salt Lake City CSA does not include Weber County? That's a good 500,000 right there I assume. That would push the Wasatch Front to over 3 million. Does it include Summit(Park City), and the other counties that include Tooele/Stansbury Park, and Heber/Midway? Brigham City and Tremonton are probably not included either, but I consider them to be part of the Wasatch Front metro. Whenever I drive into Utah from from Boise, the population just opens up when you come over the hill into Tremonton. Then it's a gradual increase in density all the way to SLC from there.
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Old Posted Apr 1, 2020, 12:47 AM
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So, the Salt Lake City CSA does not include Weber County? That's a good 500,000 right there I assume. That would push the Wasatch Front to over 3 million. Does it include Summit(Park City), and the other counties that include Tooele/Stansbury Park, and Heber/Midway? Brigham City and Tremonton are probably not included either, but I consider them to be part of the Wasatch Front metro. Whenever I drive into Utah from from Boise, the population just opens up when you come over the hill into Tremonton. Then it's a gradual increase in density all the way to SLC from there.
No, it includes the Ogden MSA. Ogden is just not part of the name of the SLC CSA

Here is what it includes:

Salt Lake City, UT Metropolitan Statistical Area
Ogden-Clearfield, UT Metropolitan Statistical Area
Provo-Orem, UT Metropolitan Statistical Area
Heber, UT Micropolitan Statistical Area
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Old Posted Apr 2, 2020, 2:49 AM
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Wrong. The fastest growing area in the state is the Oil Patch in southeastern New Mexico, due to the oil boom. Hobbs, Clovis, Carlsbad, etc. Las Cruces isn't growing any faster than Albuquerque right now. Hobbs was the 14th-fastest growing micropolitan area between 2018 and 2019 with the tenth largest numerical gain. Sandoval County in metro Albuquerque is still the largest in terms of numerical growth of counties in the state and 5th in percentage. Bernalillo County was 3rd in numerical gain and 11th in percentage. Valencia County was 8th in numerical gain and 7th in percentage. Doña Ana County was 4th in numerical gain and 8th in percentage. That means that it is behind at least two metro Albuquerque counties in either numerical or percentage growth. Las Cruces and the border counties are not the fastest growing areas in the state.

Edit: as for your link, do you realize that New Mexico's largest manufacturing export category of computer and electronics products is almost entirely made up of products made at Intel in metro Albuquerque? There are various other manufacturers in Albuquerque that make up that category as well, but the majority of it is Intel. Very little of that happens outside of metro Albuquerque or northern New Mexico (Los Alamos and Santa Fe).
Thanks for the correction and updates. I was aware (generally) of Intel and other's presence in ABQ so I'm not surprised to hear of the recent growth.

While it's been awhile I used to stop by the Albuquerque Business Journal and became aware of the plans for various urban renewal projects. As a Big fan of transportation and transit I followed your BRT project, the ART, and even posted about it a couple of times on the Denver transportation thread.
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Old Posted Apr 3, 2020, 12:52 AM
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The CSA for SLC is double that of the MSA which is why I always ignore CSA numbers and go with MSA numbers since CSA's seem to take in large areas all around the metro area so to me SLC has a population of ~1.2 million people. If you think i'm wrong just look at SLC's skyline and compare it to other MSA's of 2.5 million people and it's not even close. In fact even for a city of 1.2 million SLC doesn't have a great skyline
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Old Posted Apr 3, 2020, 4:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Phil McAvity View Post
The CSA for SLC is double that of the MSA which is why I always ignore CSA numbers and go with MSA numbers since CSA's seem to take in large areas all around the metro area so to me SLC has a population of ~1.2 million people. If you think i'm wrong just look at SLC's skyline and compare it to other MSA's of 2.5 million people and it's not even close. In fact even for a city of 1.2 million SLC doesn't have a great skyline
The CSA for SLC is more representative of the whole urban area of the Wasatch front. Provo/Orem used to actually be a part of SLC MSA.

That said, SLC skyline does suck, but the hope is that times are a changing and the skyline is improving
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Old Posted Apr 3, 2020, 5:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Phil McAvity View Post
The CSA for SLC is double that of the MSA which is why I always ignore CSA numbers and go with MSA numbers since CSA's seem to take in large areas all around the metro area so to me SLC has a population of ~1.2 million people. If you think i'm wrong just look at SLC's skyline and compare it to other MSA's of 2.5 million people and it's not even close. In fact even for a city of 1.2 million SLC doesn't have a great skyline
If you only count Salt Lake, Utah, Davis, and Weber counties, which all form a single, continuous developed area, the so-called "Greater Salt Lake City Area" has a population of about 2.3 million. That's much closer to the CSA number than the MSA number.

Here's hoping the skyline can catch up.
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