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  #61  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2020, 8:26 PM
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Sturdy Stone Centre, Saskatoon


The Sturdy Stone Centre by Matt, on Flickr
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  #62  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2020, 8:43 PM
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It's missing a Monorail.

source:https://www.deepwaterstudios.com
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  #63  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2020, 9:05 PM
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St. John's City Hall.

Unaffectionately known locally as the Bunker.

City Hall ... As good as it gets . St. John's , Newfoundland by lyndon keating, on Flickr

City Hall, St. John's by David, on Flickr







My favourite part is the ominous area for news conferences...



Coat of arms above is the provincial one, with the provincial motto "Seek ye first the Kingdom of God" lol

Also, a significant percentage of the recipients of the city's highest honour have been ships.

Coat of arms below is the city one, with John Cabot and Humphrey Gilbert, and the motto "Advance!"





The lesser honours (X of the year, etc.) have almost all gone to Brad Gushue's curling rink lol
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  #64  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2020, 10:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I can't post pictures but someone should post the huge federal office complex Place du Portage in the central Hull district of Gatineau.

It is home to 10,000 workers. One of the largest concentrations of public employees in the world.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Place_du_Portage






https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Place_du_Portage
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  #65  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2020, 10:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 11a2b3 View Post
Diamond and Schmitt designed a spectacular new glass addition that opens up the building towards the city while respecting the original architecture by continuing the geometric patterns inside and out.


https://app06.ottawa.ca/cgi-bin/door...?id=75&lang=en


https://www.reminetwork.com/articles...antern-dec-31/


https://www.pinterest.com.mx/pin/641411171903254046/
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  #66  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2020, 12:14 AM
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Not sure if it really qualifies, but some of these pics remind me of White Oaks Mall in London, at least the original 70's section. I wish there were more pics online, but much of it is these same sloped concrete grooved malls. Pic below is the front, google maps is the back. https://www.google.ca/maps/@42.93056...7i13312!8i6656

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  #67  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2020, 4:17 AM
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I feel like the NMC in Calgary is almost neo-brutalism.



Simple geometric shapes, consistent use of building material, etc.
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  #68  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2020, 5:16 AM
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The most important piece of context that people always miss when they criticize modern architecture, especially Brutalism and the International style, is that they are presenting a counter-point or alternative to the classical styles. In classical architecture, the goal was to design a building that fit classical ideas of aesthetic; for the shape and design of the building to not so much express what the building is for, but rather, for it to blend in quietly into a collective of similar buildings. Hierarchy would be represented (the more important the building, the more grand it was; it was not proper to violate that rule) but purpose was not reflected. When it came to materials, you used whatever you could for the structure—that was invisible. The face of the building was purely decoration. A lot of vernacular buildings in Europe that look stone are actually wood covered in plaster. The moldings aren't stone carvings; they're painted wood carvings. There is a lot of trickery, a lot of metaphor. To understand the stories that the architecture is telling you, you need to understand world and architectural history right back to ancient Greece. Why are classical columns designed the way they are? There are reasons for it! Do you know them? Probably not. But they look pretty!

Prettier than this, I assume you'll say:


189 Red River Rd., built 1989, architect Arthur Erickson


So, how modernism and Brutalism contrast to this is now obvious.

Classical ideas of aesthetic? No. Abandon aesthetic. We want modern: clean lines, no historical imagery. We've just invented a massive inventory of new building materials and techniques, let's not hide them! Let's express them. Buildings aren't decorated piles of stones with mysteries inside anymore. They're machines. Look at how they work! Look at what they're made of, what holds them up! That's the modernist philosophy. No more does every building look the same: not only does the shape of the building express what it does, the shapes that make up the building express what the parts of the building itself do within the whole. Brutalist buildings are probably the best example of this. Historical universities or schools were boxes, and the different activities going on inside were just stuffed into the box. In Brutalism, the library has a distinct shape from the labs which are distinct from the classrooms which are distinct from the cafeteria. All have a common theme, but just by looking at the building, you can determine that it's many parts coming together and forming a single entity. What is the building made of? Gone are the days when structural members were hidden inside brick and wood veneers. You can touch the supporting columns. You can see the imprint of the wooden slats used to hold the concrete in place while it dried. Different materials have different textures, and you can use them to make patterns and express ideas that way, instead of using ancient metaphors and allegories and carvings of acanthus leaves. When is the last time you saw an acanthus? Millions of them are carved into Canadian buildings for no reason other than "it has been done for 2,500 years".

But the most important reason architecture changed so sharply in the interwar period, and then modernism cemented itself in the postwar years? It looked toward the future. Back then, people were more optimistic about the future than we are today. They looked at the classical buildings we fawn over and many people saw dusty, obsolete trash. They knocked it all down with glee. At the time, every building looked that way, and everyone knew that those veneers were not genuine. The largest classical office building in my city is covered in terra cotta panels and carvings mass produced in Montreal intended to decorate the exteriors of middle class homes, with the exception of a carving bearing the name of the building none of them were intended for it; they depict monkeys and guava. It was an office building for a timber and ship building company. Under that is an ugly concrete and brick superstructure, nothing anyone would say is pleasing. It's facade is nothing more than a facade. In Brutalism, there is no facade; only structure.

This building:



The vertical columns between the windows are I-Beams welded to the facade so that the expressive elements of its architecture are literally the same thing that holds the building up. Not Brutalism, but the same idea: celebrating what makes the building a building, not celebrating centuries old tradition that means little to most people today. Classical proportions, International style was all about that: the building is a conformist box of a certain proportion is one feature International and Brutalism do not share (those concrete boxes that you think are Brutalist, like these two buildings, are actually International).

If you can explain all of the reasons classical architecture uses the proportions, materials, carvings, columns, layouts that it does, then go ahead, tell me how great it is. But you can't. Few can. You need to go to university to do that. The style "beaux arts" is literally named for L'Ecole des Beaux Arts, the school where they taught architecture in that specific style, inspired by a certain interpretation of existing classical styles.

I've always found classical architecture to be pretty, mainly because it's old and "intricate", but modern architecture, especially Brutalism, is wondrous, and unlike classical architecture, where the closer you look, the more you find unintended imperfections and flaws and lies (especially here in the north where most of the grand buildings were kits made in quarries near Toronto and shipped here to be assembled like Lego) but with modern architecture, the closer you look, the more obvious its philosophy is.
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  #69  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2020, 2:38 PM
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Projects — Additions & Renovations — Noor Cultural Centre (formerly Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre) Toronto


Source: https://mtarch.com/

This building was originally the Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre and was designed and built by Moriyama & Teshima Architects in 1963. The location and design of the building was carefully planned to support and honour the place of Japanese-Canadians in Canada. While the building materials are quite modern, the proportions of the building, the landscaping, and details are very traditionally Japanese. The building also has elements designed to draw parallels to the experiences of those Canadians incarcerated during World War II — the 2 storey windows in the main hall have lattice reminiscent of bars, and rain water is directed off the roof using chains attached to stones on the ground.















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  #70  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2020, 2:45 PM
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Projects — Arts & Cultural — Ontario Science Centre

Source: https://mtarch.com/

In 1964 Moriyama & Teshima received the commission to design a science centre to celebrate Canada’s 100th birthday. At that time “participatory” and “hands-on” were new and, to many, highly suspicious words; science museums were still reliant on labels and display cases.

In order to involve large numbers of people in the process of learning, we tried to convey the excitement felt by scientists as they break through to new discovery. Inside and outside, the building attempts to engage all senses and encourage exploration and physical participation.

Exhibit halls are designed to human scale, and intermediate areas provide spaces where visitors can admire the magnificent surrounding landscape, reflect on their experience, and anticipate what lies ahead.

Conceived in the form of a city, the Centre respects the existing trees and configuration of land table, valley, and ravine. Throughout, vistas of the natural landscape are constant reminders that, despite the emphasis on science and technology, nature remains the basis of life.































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  #71  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2020, 2:52 PM
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Since somebody posted the NMC in Calgary could the new Aga Khan Museum also be a form of Modern Brutalism?

Source: Source: https://mtarch.com/

The Aga Khan Museum fosters knowledge and understanding of Islamic civilization through cultural programming and an extraordinary collection of Islamic arts and artifacts, drawn from the collections of His Highness the Aga Khan, Prince and Princess Sadruddin Aga Khan and the Institute of Ismaili Studies in London.

Light being the primary inspiration for the project, the building acts as a vessel that is both animated and sculpted by light in myriad ways: casting patterns on the exterior walls of Brazilian granite, enhancing interior spaces, or illuminating the open-roofed courtyard.

The building contains two large exhibition galleries, art conservation and storage spaces, a 350-seat theatre, and classrooms. The contemporary design incorporates historical elements originating in Islamic cultures, building bridges between eras and civilizations.

Set within a 6.8 hectare park (designed by Vladimir Djurovic with Moriyama & Teshima Planners), the Museum shares a site with the Ismaili Centre (designed by Charles Correa with Moriyama & Teshima Architects). The complex is a symbolic marker of the permanent presence of the Ismaili community in Canada and promotes cultural, religious and intellectual exploration.








The interior is stunning, I need to go and see this thing for myself.









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  #72  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2020, 2:58 PM
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Also how about it's neighbour the Ismali Centre?

Source: https://mtarch.com/


The Ismaili Centre uniquely responds to established Islamic building traditions, while incorporating contemporary architectural form, materiality and construction methods. The architectural language distinguishes a community that is both informed by its past and modern in its outlook, inviting peaceful faith and contemplation, intellectual discovery and public outreach.

The centerpiece of the project is the prayer hall, whose crystalline glass roof creates ever-changing interior lighting conditions. During the day, as sunlight is filtered and diffused through the translucent glass, the serene prayer hall inspires users to physically and spiritually connect with both the sky above and the ground below. At night, the glass roof glows like a beacon in the dark sky, rising elegantly above the surrounding landscape.

Set within a 6.8 hectare park (designed by Vladimir Djurovic with Moriyama & Teshima Planners), the Ismaili Centre shares a site with the Aga Khan Museum (designed by Fumihiko Maki with Moriyama & Teshima Architects). The complex is a symbolic marker of the permanent presence of the Ismaili community in Canada, and an ambassadorial space intended to foster understanding of pluralism.









Which also has a stunning interior.











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  #73  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2020, 3:09 PM
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Forgive me if someone already said this, but there seems to be a lot of overlap between brutalism and modernism, no?

The Sheraton, as pointed out, is a brutalist example, but what about City Hall right across the street? Lots of concrete, that's for sure.


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  #74  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2020, 3:52 PM
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Brutalism is an expressive offshoot of modernism. It does have similarities with other forms of modern expressionism. I've noticed a few examples of modern expressionism posted that aren't examples of Brutalism which could be confusing. The posting of new buildings is expected but, doesn't help either. Yeah, Brutalism didn't die. It evolved into postmodern forms of expressionism.

City Hall is as far from Brutalism as you can get. In the simplest terms, it's the opposite of an ornate, hulking box. It has an interesting massing and the finishes are minimal.
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  #75  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2020, 4:29 PM
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Modernism is a huge umbrella term for dozens of styles from about 1920-1985, calling something brutalist "related to modernism" is meaningless. While we're on the subject, I'd like to call attention to Trump's recent decision to mandate neoclassical architecture for all federal government projects, pandering to his base's fascist streak and ending a decades-long tradition of building federal offices, as a matter of policy, in the style of their own time.

https://frieze.com/article/what-trum...n-really-means
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  #76  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2020, 5:17 PM
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The near majority of the U of R:





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  #77  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2020, 5:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by megadude View Post
Forgive me if someone already said this, but there seems to be a lot of overlap between brutalism and modernism, no?

The Sheraton, as pointed out, is a brutalist example, but what about City Hall right across the street? Lots of concrete, that's for sure.

Here's a pretty good primer on whats not Brutalist: https://mcmansionhell.com/post/18780...utalism-is-not
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  #78  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2020, 6:53 PM
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  #79  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2020, 6:55 PM
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  #80  
Old Posted Feb 29, 2020, 2:27 AM
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what I learnt from this thread is that brutalism looks great for building less than 5 floors and landscrapers but looks like trash for anything taller
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