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  #461  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 10:51 PM
Airboy Airboy is offline
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Originally Posted by Sasha View Post
It's really great that Iqaluit is getting hooked up to high-speed internet! This is going to be one massive step towards improving the economic situation of Nunuvuts capital. I hope the new port will drive down the costs to import materials to build more (high quality) housing. One thing the feds might want to invest in would be a massive public storage house so that building materials are not degraded in the weather before being used. This coupled with enforcement of the National Building Code and allowing people to own land (which in the beginning would involve distributing land to everyone) would improve housing stock quality dramatically. And finally, more affordable housing units are needed for Iqaulit's massive homeless problem.

I'm just some white asshole, and I don't know all of the ins and outs of this kind of stuff. This being said, I think Iqaluit has lots of untapped potential. Instead of being spread out over many little hamlets because the government put them and their families there back in the day, the native people of the north will move to the capital. The mecca of the Inuit that will provide economic opportunities unheard of in their little home towns.

I see many industries that could bring Iqaulit money, it's just that the infrastructure is not there yet. Food prices are high despite government subsidies. Rent is expensive beacuse it costs too much to build new units. But if these problems are resolved, here are some industries that could exist in the city:
  • Coast Gaurd / Navy base for patrolling the Northwest Passage (Will get very busy in the future)
  • Database hub (If cheap electricity could be developed)
  • Tourism (Including an arctic casino)
  • Cargo flight refuelling, crew swap, and sorting (Like Anchorage)
  • Cold weather testing for various machines (Autos, planes...)
  • Winter warfare training for various nations. only Canada does this now and only in the spring.
  • Cargo shipping hub (For NWP) (Very expensive) The bay is to unpredictable for ice conditions. There once was talk of a deep water port at Kimurut and then a road inland.
  • Oil and Gas (Although the people there are against it)
  • Onshore and Offshore wind (if there was a grid connection to large market)

Are there any other industries that could work in Iqaluit?
I don't see many other industries moving in other than mining. As you said the cost of logistics is extremely high. But it is nice to see this finally get moving. there was another possible high speed route over the top but that fell through. Now that I am not doing work up there they get it.
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  #462  
Old Posted Dec 7, 2019, 10:52 PM
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April Melissa Sandever
 
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Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sasha View Post
It's really great that Iqaluit is getting hooked up to high-speed internet! This is going to be one massive step towards improving the economic situation of Nunuvuts capital. I hope the new port will drive down the costs to import materials to build more (high quality) housing. One thing the feds might want to invest in would be a massive public storage house so that building materials are not degraded in the weather before being used. This coupled with enforcement of the National Building Code and allowing people to own land (which in the beginning would involve distributing land to everyone) would improve housing stock quality dramatically. And finally, more affordable housing units are needed for Iqaulit's massive homeless problem.

I'm just some white asshole, and I don't know all of the ins and outs of this kind of stuff. This being said, I think Iqaluit has lots of untapped potential. Instead of being spread out over many little hamlets because the government put them and their families there back in the day, the native people of the north will move to the capital. The mecca of the Inuit that will provide economic opportunities unheard of in their little home towns.

I see many industries that could bring Iqaulit money, it's just that the infrastructure is not there yet. Food prices are high despite government subsidies. Rent is expensive beacuse it costs too much to build new units. But if these problems are resolved, here are some industries that could exist in the city:
  • Coast Gaurd / Navy base for patrolling the Northwest Passage (Will get very busy in the future)
  • Database hub (If cheap electricity could be developed)
  • Tourism (Including an arctic casino)
  • Cargo flight refuelling, crew swap, and sorting (Like Anchorage)
  • Cold weather testing for various machines (Autos, planes...)
  • Winter warfare training for various nations
  • Cargo shipping hub (For NWP) (Very expensive)
  • Oil and Gas (Although the people there are against it)
  • Onshore and Offshore wind (if there was a grid connection to large market)

Are there any other industries that could work in Iqaluit?
Slightly off topic just wondering if Shaw was the one to bring high speed internet to Iqaluit?
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  #463  
Old Posted Dec 8, 2019, 4:06 PM
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Originally Posted by melissasandever View Post
Slightly off topic just wondering if Shaw was the one to bring high speed internet to Iqaluit?
The Federal Gov is doing it. Line is coming from Greenland then crossing the island to Kimurrut. Figure if they are coming across that way they could hook up Qikiktarjuak as well.

https://nunatsiaq.com/stories/articl...ptic-internet/

In other news Kuglutuk is getting a new Sola Diesel power plant. Should help cut down on fuel use.
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  #464  
Old Posted Dec 14, 2019, 5:18 PM
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Psychedelic Sailor Psychedelic Sailor is offline
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Building boom underway in Iqaluit
But this year’s developments won’t put a dent in city’s housing shortage
19 November 2019 – 9:30 am EST


By Thomas Rohner
Special to Nunatsiaq News

As winter returns to Iqaluit, snow and ice settle on a changed city landscape: six new major developments began construction this past sealift season. That includes 92 residential units and 179 hotel rooms, according to the city’s planning and development office.





https://nunatsiaq.com/stories/articl...ay-in-iqaluit/
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  #465  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2019, 9:56 PM
Apey Apey is offline
April Melissa Sandever
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Airboy View Post
The Federal Gov is doing it. Line is coming from Greenland then crossing the island to Kimurrut. Figure if they are coming across that way they could hook up Qikiktarjuak as well.

https://nunatsiaq.com/stories/articl...ptic-internet/

In other news Kuglutuk is getting a new Sola Diesel power plant. Should help cut down on fuel use.
Thanks for the link, answered some other questions I had as well!
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  #466  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2019, 9:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Psychedelic Sailor View Post
Building boom underway in Iqaluit
But this year’s developments won’t put a dent in city’s housing shortage
19 November 2019 – 9:30 am EST


By Thomas Rohner
Special to Nunatsiaq News

As winter returns to Iqaluit, snow and ice settle on a changed city landscape: six new major developments began construction this past sealift season. That includes 92 residential units and 179 hotel rooms, according to the city’s planning and development office.





https://nunatsiaq.com/stories/articl...ay-in-iqaluit/
Interesting article! Myself I am waiting to see what the delay with the Kingdom Hall is. Usually most Witnesses are all gung hoe to get Witness Halls built, based on prior experience!
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  #467  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2019, 4:54 PM
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Originally Posted by melissasandever View Post
Interesting article! Myself I am waiting to see what the delay with the Kingdom Hall is. Usually most Witnesses are all gung hoe to get Witness Halls built, based on prior experience!
I'll miss the Discovery though. Those tilted hallway, and the toilets with the macerators.
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  #468  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2020, 8:27 AM
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Why is it that the human development in Greenland is so far beyond that of Nunavut? I would love to know more about the historic circumstances behind this. Both are vast majority Inuit territories, they are governed by two different former colonial empires, their climates are relatively similar, though southwestern Greenland is more moderate than Baffin Island. One has the only Inuit higher education institution on the planet, is planning the construction of an indoor stadium, and has a fully operational deepwater port, while the other struggles to provide basic services to the population.



Nuuk, Kalaallit Nunaat (Greenland) - 18 000


http://mvfram.blogspot.com/2015/06/a...reenlands.html



Iqaluit, Nunavut - 8 000


https://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle...phonie-iqaluit
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  #469  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2020, 9:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Chadillaccc View Post
Why is it that the human development in Greenland is so far beyond that of Nunavut?
Denmark invests a ton of money in Greenland to make sure everything is up to Danish standards. Danes also care about design and are good at it.

Canada figures out what the absolute minimum they need to invest in the North then invest about one quarter that amount. Design? That's not even on their radar. There's a reason everything looks like a cheap tin can: it's all about building the cheapest piece of garbage possible. Even if they did care about design, our culture doesn't seem to be very good at it. Just look at the primitive garbage they built next to the Alberta Legislature. Buildings like that would never get approved in Denmark let alone go up next to their parliament.
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  #470  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2020, 9:50 AM
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Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
Denmark invests a ton of money in Greenland to make sure everything is up to Danish standards. Danes also care about design and are good at it.

Canada figures out what the absolute minimum they need to invest in the North then invest about one quarter that amount. Design? That's not even on their radar. There's a reason everything looks like a cheap tin can: it's all about building the cheapest piece of garbage possible. Even if they did care about design, our culture doesn't seem to be very good at it. Just look at the primitive garbage they built next to the Alberta Legislature. Buildings like that would never get approved in Denmark let alone go up next to their parliament.
Canada (except maybe the province of Quebec) has to be one of the ugliest in the developed world when it comes to built-up areas. No thought given to design or beauty at all.
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  #471  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2020, 2:31 PM
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Originally Posted by saffronleaf View Post
Canada (except maybe the province of Quebec) has to be one of the ugliest in the developed world when it comes to built-up areas. No thought given to design or beauty at all.
In all honesty, there were lots of doozies built all over Quebec from the 1960s and in the decades following. But we're at least fortunate to have inherited a decent amount of nice stuff in our top cities.

And there is also a clear commitment on the part of public officials here to put a lot of effort into improving things going forward.
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  #472  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2020, 2:34 PM
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I had also noticed that Nuuk looks infinitely better than Iqaluit. Their buildings look "normal" and even have balconies, quite the contrast with the cheap prefab boxes of Iqaluit. They also have mass transit.
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  #473  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2020, 2:36 PM
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Originally Posted by saffronleaf View Post
Canada (except maybe the province of Quebec) has to be one of the ugliest in the developed world when it comes to built-up areas. No thought given to design or beauty at all.
Funny that you think that. I always thought that small towns in Ontario looked better than their Quebec counterparts. Churches tend to be nicer in Quebec though.
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  #474  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2020, 3:31 PM
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Originally Posted by le calmar View Post
I had also noticed that Nuuk looks infinitely better than Iqaluit. Their buildings look "normal" and even have balconies, quite the contrast with the cheap prefab boxes of Iqaluit. They also have mass transit.
"Tin can" I thought was a pretty good descriptor.
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  #475  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2020, 4:21 PM
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Nuuk is also much warmer than Iqaluit. It’s hovering around -10 right now compared to -30 for Iqaluit.

Summers are pretty comparable but the lack of extreme winter cold makes Nuuk a lot more habitable.
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  #476  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2020, 4:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Innsertnamehere View Post
Nuuk is also much warmer than Iqaluit. It’s hovering around -10 right now compared to -30 for Iqaluit.

Summers are pretty comparable but the lack of extreme winter cold makes Nuuk a lot more habitable.
I suppose we should blame the Labrador current for that (I don't think the Gulf Stream has an influence at this latitude?). It is surprising that there would be such a big difference for two coastal cities located at the same latitude, only 500 km apart.
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  #477  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2020, 5:10 PM
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Iqaluit is also a relatively new town and capital. It was much smaller before it became a capital 20 years ago. The older capital (Yellowknife) is a more impressive town with more impressive amenities.
And like Nuuk it isn’t isolated for more than half the year. You can build better and cheaper when you’re not limited to one or two boats a year.
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  #478  
Old Posted Feb 18, 2020, 7:45 PM
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Temperature and terrain are the driving factors. Logistics as well. Getting anything into Iqaluit is tough. For building, everything must fit in a container. It does limit your design options. But there are exceptions, YFB terminal. RCMP building, Picsilarvik Building up Island to name a few. As for the housing, the design has changed a bit. But it depends if it is someone building a private home or a government 4 to 10 plex. As for the colours, think NFLD.
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