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  #3681  
Old Posted May 19, 2020, 5:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Vorkuta View Post
Wear "Roots" gear and avoid all jersey's (even les habs)?

Personally, I don't "sports", but I'd not be caught dead in team-apparel in Europe. Even futbol stuff. Which you'd THINK would be better, but in actuality is WORSE...
People can wear whatever the hell they want. I don't really care.

I just find the complaints about "mistaken identity" from Canadians whose usual get-up (at home and abroad, I assume) mimics classic ostentatious Americana very ironic.

But I am also the type who shakes his head when people wearing a jean jacket and sneakers when it's -20 complain about the cold.
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  #3682  
Old Posted May 19, 2020, 5:26 PM
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Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
If you think about the rest of the world, it's not normal for foreigners to be able to tell people from different countries apart by how they look or talk. There are a few distinctive countries like Japan or Britain (islands with thousands of years of distinct culture) but most are not like that.

I would not expect most people from a different continent to be able to guess which Latin American or Eastern European or African or Southeast Asian country somebody is from. Or for somebody from Laos to get upset if they are mistaken for Cambodian, but who knows?
True, but few if any of these nationalities have an ingrained doubt about whether or not they truly are different from the neighbours, as part of the national psyche.

When I am abroad with my family based on the language we are speaking we occasionally get asked if we're from France, and we find it more amusing than anything.
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Still a really nice group of people to spend Christmas dinner with, though.
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  #3683  
Old Posted May 19, 2020, 6:15 PM
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Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
Accents in Canada are very class-oriented, much more so than in the US. If you take 2 mangiacake Canadians, I think that most people with some English fluency would be able to tell the difference between a working class person from a middle class person pretty easily. More so, even, than being able to distinguish a Canadian middle class person from an American middle class person.

I've mentioned before that I think one of Canada's British hangovers is a sharper distinction between social classes. Americans have less of that. That's not to say that the American working class has better opportunities for advancement, or are materially better off, or any of that - let alone dragging in the issue of race in America, which Canadians who want to refute my point invariably will.
I think you're mostly right. It's sad.. because sometimes I feel my vowels are not all that classy. I may even have a stronger ''raise'' than most people. Though this could just be my imagination.
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  #3684  
Old Posted May 19, 2020, 6:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Though I am sure you're aware that many Canadians are indeed bothered by that.

Occasionally some might even flip out about it. (Ironically, in total contradiction to the reputation Canadians have for being reserved.)

On a related but a bit bizarre note, a Franco-Ontarien relative of my wife's got all miffed in Paris when people mistook her for Québécois.

She went on about how they were Franco-Ontariens which were not at all like Québécois blablabla...

I am sure the Parisians rolled their eyes and thought, Franco-Onta....quoi????

Yes, I’m aware but I don’t really understand it. Just as easy to think of it as a compliment, istm.
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  #3685  
Old Posted May 19, 2020, 6:23 PM
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Yes, I’m aware but I don’t really understand it. Just as easy to think of it as a compliment, istm.
Though I never ever made a stink, it used to irk me quite a bit when I was a young ROCer/MOCer and highly patriotic Canadian.

I eventually moved on from all that and today I don't see it as a compliment or an insult. Just neutral. Often in tourism circles it's just small talk intended to separate you from even more of your money.
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Still a really nice group of people to spend Christmas dinner with, though.
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  #3686  
Old Posted May 19, 2020, 6:26 PM
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Originally Posted by kool maudit View Post
A lot of Europeans will exaggeratedly bow and scrape if, after asking you what part of the states you're from, you reply with "actually I'm Canadian".

They're just being nice and showing that they are aware of our thing, but I don't really think it reflects very well on us. I think that if a country is going to make such a big deal of differentiating itself, maybe it should actually differentiate itself.

If we wind up conversing about it, I usually say something like "hey, no worries -- it's just the usual 'little neighbour' stuff. I do it to Austrians and Belgians myself!"
That’s exactly why I like my usual answers to the question - it can leave them bowing and scraping for no reason, which amuses me. Especially if the person is English - that just makes it even more enjoyable.
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  #3687  
Old Posted May 19, 2020, 6:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
On a related but a bit bizarre note, a Franco-Ontarien relative of my wife's got all miffed in Paris when people mistook her for Québécois.
I missed this before. Oh boy. How dare you people 6,000 km away fail to get my provincial Canadian minority status right?

How many Canadians can tell the difference between Normand and Auvergnat culture or language?

I will admit I don't even think of Franco-Ontarien as a separate "thing" from Quebec. I just thought of it as people who spilled over into Ontario from Quebec, while I think of Acadians as separate. I have Francophone relatives and I was born in Nova Scotia but they are from Quebec and I don't self-identify as Acadian (Acadian doesn't mean "French-speaking person from the Maritimes", it's a specific culture).
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  #3688  
Old Posted May 19, 2020, 6:37 PM
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I missed this before. Oh boy. How dare you people 6,000 km away fail to get my provincial Canadian minority status right?

I will admit I don't even think of Franco-Ontarien as a separate "thing" from Quebec. I just thought of it as people who spilled over into Quebec from Ontario, while I think of Acadians as separate. I have Francophone relatives and I was born in Nova Scotia but they are from Quebec and I don't self-identify as Acadian at all for example (Acadian doesn't mean "French-speaking person from the Maritimes", it's a specific culture).
"Acadien" would no doubt register a bit more in France, as there have been a number of Acadien celebrities and things that have attained visibility under that umbrella over the years across the pond.
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*An assembly of shareholders that likes to pretend it is a close-knit family, in order to maintain access to grandpa's inheritance.

Still a really nice group of people to spend Christmas dinner with, though.
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  #3689  
Old Posted May 19, 2020, 8:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Many are often visibly uncomfortable about having made that type of faux-pas.
I have been effusively apologized to by foreigners who have taken me for an American while I've been abroad. I have to admit the first time it happened, I was taken aback... it's like they expected my nose to be out of joint about it.
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