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  #2561  
Old Posted May 8, 2020, 4:34 PM
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Originally Posted by esquire View Post
To be clear, I think what Canadian sports networks should show is sports (how revolutionary). If there aren't any Canadian sports to show, then look abroad. The US is fine, but the problem with that is that there aren't any sports that are taking place as yet, at least to my knowledge.
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That's the simple answer, anyway.

Where it gets complicated is with "If there aren't any Canadian sports to show, then look abroad. The US is fine".

Typically in normal times Canadian sports networks don't necessarily prioritize Canadian programming so that statement is not based in reality.

Which in itself is actually OK in specific cases. I don't have an issue with them making a big deal about the Super Bowl or the NCAA basketball final game, over a CHL game between Bathurst and Shawinigan.

The issue is more with how Canadian sports properties get treated on a more general everyday level, compared to run-of-the-mill U.S. sports properties. The latter receiving top-level "domestic" billing and coverage far too often from TSN and SN.
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  #2562  
Old Posted May 8, 2020, 4:38 PM
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I am reminded for some reason of the one time I was with visitors from abroad and went to my local video store in Eastern Ontario looking for a Canadian movie.

When I asked the clerk for it by title (which included the name of a Canadian city BTW), he at first appeared puzzled, then became dismissive and brushed us off by saying "If we have, it'd be in the foreign section!"
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  #2563  
Old Posted May 8, 2020, 5:21 PM
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Originally Posted by esquire View Post
I know it takes some time to get broadcasting deals done and what not, but I'd be happy with Korean soccer and Taiwanese baseball. Even if I wouldn't watch it obsessively at least I'd feel like I was getting something for my cable fees.
As much as I agree with you I think the work it would take to get something like Korean soccer or Taiwanese baseball onto TSN or SN wouldn't be worth it...the number of people tuning in would definitely be less than your standard Leafs Lunch or Americans Yelling At Each Other programs. I just don't see Asian sports properties being worth the ROI for either network for any period of time. I also don't think either network is flexible or quick enough to pick up and drop properties as they please. It could be possible for them to pick up the properties for their streaming platforms which would certainly have better ROI, but in the long-term the number of Canadians signing up for TSN streaming to watch K-League soccer is probably very, very low. We're talking about networks that lost Champions League and the EPL to DAZN - they're not going for Korean soccer.

It's part of the reason why OneSoccer was able to snatch up Mexican and Chinese soccer rights so easily in Canada - there was simply no interest in them from TSN/SN. IIRC DAZN has the rights for soccer in Japan, France, and Spain, on top of the OneSoccer offerings. I think the Bundesliga, which is returning next Friday, is trapped in endless purgatory on Sportsnet World.
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  #2564  
Old Posted May 8, 2020, 5:54 PM
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Originally Posted by JHikka View Post
As much as I agree with you I think the work it would take to get something like Korean soccer or Taiwanese baseball onto TSN or SN wouldn't be worth it...the number of people tuning in would definitely be less than your standard Leafs Lunch or Americans Yelling At Each Other programs. I just don't see Asian sports properties being worth the ROI for either network for any period of time. I also don't think either network is flexible or quick enough to pick up and drop properties as they please. It could be possible for them to pick up the properties for their streaming platforms which would certainly have better ROI, but in the long-term the number of Canadians signing up for TSN streaming to watch K-League soccer is probably very, very low. We're talking about networks that lost Champions League and the EPL to DAZN - they're not going for Korean soccer.

It's part of the reason why OneSoccer was able to snatch up Mexican and Chinese soccer rights so easily in Canada - there was simply no interest in them from TSN/SN. IIRC DAZN has the rights for soccer in Japan, France, and Spain, on top of the OneSoccer offerings. I think the Bundesliga, which is returning next Friday, is trapped in endless purgatory on Sportsnet World.
I'm curious where big-tent sports networks go from here, in the age of customizing one's content.

Do they remain relevant in an age where one can just cut out the middleman and get exactly what they want? Or do they wither like network TV in the age of Netflix?

Or is their variety what saves them? You get hockey/curling in the winter and baseball in the summer, with a slice of World Cup every 4 years. Pay one cost instead of a dozen subscriptions nibbling things away.

It'll be interesting, but I don't think it portends well for smaller Canadian sports who rely on this sort of access. Kind of like how the shift to streaming hasn't exactly led to a bloom in Canadian shows - without the demand for content by Canadian networks as per Can-con, does something like Corner Gas arise again? Does the ultimate globalization of streaming kill the last vestiges of Canadiana? (excepting Quebec)
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  #2565  
Old Posted May 8, 2020, 6:07 PM
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Originally Posted by JHikka View Post
As much as I agree with you I think the work it would take to get something like Korean soccer or Taiwanese baseball onto TSN or SN wouldn't be worth it...the number of people tuning in would definitely be less than your standard Leafs Lunch or Americans Yelling At Each Other programs. I just don't see Asian sports properties being worth the ROI for either network for any period of time. I also don't think either network is flexible or quick enough to pick up and drop properties as they please. It could be possible for them to pick up the properties for their streaming platforms which would certainly have better ROI, but in the long-term the number of Canadians signing up for TSN streaming to watch K-League soccer is probably very, very low. We're talking about networks that lost Champions League and the EPL to DAZN - they're not going for Korean soccer.

It's part of the reason why OneSoccer was able to snatch up Mexican and Chinese soccer rights so easily in Canada - there was simply no interest in them from TSN/SN. IIRC DAZN has the rights for soccer in Japan, France, and Spain, on top of the OneSoccer offerings. I think the Bundesliga, which is returning next Friday, is trapped in endless purgatory on Sportsnet World.
You are probably right in that it may not be worth the time and effort of the networks to chase those Asian sports, but on the other hand things do happen quickly when circumstances change. There are always one-off events that spring up during labour disputes (I vaguely recall the Gretzky's All Stars thing during the, what was it, 1995 NHL lockout?) and those have been put together and put on TV quite quickly. I realize Korean soccer wouldn't have much lasting appeal beyond covid, but I'm sure there would be some people watching while it's the only game in town. I'd probably watch a game or two out of sheer curiosity. It's not like the Korean league would charge an arm and a leg for the rights.

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Originally Posted by wave46 View Post
I'm curious where big-tent sports networks go from here, in the age of customizing one's content.

Do they remain relevant in an age where one can just cut out the middleman and get exactly what they want? Or do they wither like network TV in the age of Netflix?

Or is their variety what saves them? You get hockey/curling in the winter and baseball in the summer, with a slice of World Cup every 4 years. Pay one cost instead of a dozen subscriptions nibbling things away.

It'll be interesting, but I don't think it portends well for smaller Canadian sports who rely on this sort of access. Kind of like how the shift to streaming hasn't exactly led to a bloom in Canadian shows - without the demand for content by Canadian networks as per Can-con, does something like Corner Gas arise again? Does the ultimate globalization of streaming kill the last vestiges of Canadiana? (excepting Quebec)
Part of the issue with streaming is that so many of the services are hot garbage and expensive to boot. Sometimes Manitoba Moose games are streamed for free on AHL TV and it is crap... there's no way I'd be paying the sticker price for that, it's something like 80 or 100 USD a season. The WHL's streaming service is even lower quality. If I have to fork out a bunch of money and then screw around with my phone and a Chromecast box just to make it work then it should at least be good, but it isn't.
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  #2566  
Old Posted May 8, 2020, 7:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wave46 View Post
I'm curious where big-tent sports networks go from here, in the age of customizing one's content.

Do they remain relevant in an age where one can just cut out the middleman and get exactly what they want? Or do they wither like network TV in the age of Netflix?

Or is their variety what saves them? You get hockey/curling in the winter and baseball in the summer, with a slice of World Cup every 4 years. Pay one cost instead of a dozen subscriptions nibbling things away.
I think network sports as we know them are on the decline. Where possible, leagues and sports are generating their own streaming and video platforms and, as you said, are cutting out the network middleman entirely. CPL has done this in Canada and Formula 1 has done it internationally. Why beg networks to make content when you can do it on your own and have complete control over it? I'd rather give F1 my money directly than pay TSN to give me abbreviated coverage.

The costs for network sports channels are still out of whack since they're tied to cable, phone, internet, etc. I can pay sub fees for DAZN and OS and get a decent amount of the sports I want to watch at a fraction of the price. I don't see the value in paying for TSN unless I want to additionally watch NCAA, half of Raptors games, and maybe some non-blacked out NHL games. Additionally, it seems kind of silly to pay for TSN monthly if I want to watch the World Juniors or World Cup once a year.

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Originally Posted by wave46 View Post
It'll be interesting, but I don't think it portends well for smaller Canadian sports who rely on this sort of access. Kind of like how the shift to streaming hasn't exactly led to a bloom in Canadian shows - without the demand for content by Canadian networks as per Can-con, does something like Corner Gas arise again? Does the ultimate globalization of streaming kill the last vestiges of Canadiana? (excepting Quebec)
I understand what you're saying but my understanding is that Schitt's Creek, as one example, was one of the most popular Canadian shows of recent memory, both north and south of the border, and a lot of that was due to streaming and online availability. Perhaps i'm just in a bubble but the show seemed to get a lot of traction online. Having shows like that or Kim's Convenience available on streaming services is just an added bonus. Allowing Canadian content to go out on Netflix or Prime for an international audience is certainly better than in the past.

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Originally Posted by esquire
You are probably right in that it may not be worth the time and effort of the networks to chase those Asian sports, but on the other hand things do happen quickly when circumstances change. There are always one-off events that spring up during labour disputes (I vaguely recall the Gretzky's All Stars thing during the, what was it, 1995 NHL lockout?) and those have been put together and put on TV quite quickly.
Right, but these are sort of made-for-TV events to fill time and maybe raise money. COVID sort of destroys any potential for these sort of events outside of streamed and virtual events. Picking up K-League is more of a time fill and less of a money-maker, unless LG or Samsung want to pick up all of the commercial spots and pay TSN hand over fist for them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by esquire
I realize Korean soccer wouldn't have much lasting appeal beyond covid, but I'm sure there would be some people watching while it's the only game in town. I'd probably watch a game or two out of sheer curiosity. It's not like the Korean league would charge an arm and a leg for the rights.
You're right, but i'm still fairly certain more Canadians would watch reruns of SportsCentre or Top 50 shows at 3AM than watch K-League. I just don't see the upswing for the time and effort needed on TSN's part. It says a lot when TSN would rather show Canada hockey games from the 70s and 80s than attempt to show live sports.

Your remarks remind of me how well eNASCAR is doing south of the border during these times. Probably proportionally better than actual NASCAR once expenses are taken into account.
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  #2567  
Old Posted May 8, 2020, 10:06 PM
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Originally Posted by JHikka View Post
You're right, but i'm still fairly certain more Canadians would watch reruns of SportsCentre or Top 50 shows at 3AM than watch K-League. I just don't see the upswing for the time and effort needed on TSN's part. It says a lot when TSN would rather show Canada hockey games from the 70s and 80s than attempt to show live sports.
Yeah, you're right. Clearly TSN is better off showing its endless series of Top 50 shows and WJHC games from the last 15 years than Asian soccer or football, otherwise they'd be showing the latter. I'm just surprised that's the case...

I guess TSN is no different than the other cable channels where cheap content reigns supreme... it explains why lowbrow reality shows dominate on so many of them.
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  #2568  
Old Posted May 14, 2020, 7:20 PM
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Sportsnet will be airing Bundesliga on its main channel this weekend. SN, SN1, SNW, and SNNOW.
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  #2569  
Old Posted May 14, 2020, 7:34 PM
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Sportsnet will be airing Bundesliga on its main channel this weekend. SN, SN1, SNW, and SNNOW.
Yipee my dad being from Hamburg I cheer for them but Hamburg has been terrible club for quite some time now but its better than nothing.
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