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  #25101  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 4:31 PM
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Marty_Mcfly Marty_Mcfly is offline
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Originally Posted by Tancredi View Post
yes I remember. But I don't understand why you don't even consider the few hours of sunshine you have in summer because of the frequent mists and clouds. : Scrollata di spalle:
It doesn't seem to be an issue in other cities with similar number of hours of sunshine during the growing seasons. Great example being the other Saint John, in New Brunswick.

Plus if you're strictly talking about the natural Boreal forest with fir and spruce trees those species tend to not grow so high to begin with. Plus they also tend to be very slow growers even in the best of conditions. Check out some of the google streetview captures from northern Ontario like just outside Sudbury, they're not huge either. Definitely a bit taller than here, but not by too much. Much taller than the more exposed trees here though.

Of course, our really exposed southern coastal areas are so inhospitable for trees that they look more like the tundra or plains than anything else:
https://www.google.com/maps/@46.8699...7i13312!8i6656
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  #25102  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 4:52 PM
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Since it’s July 14, quick cam screen grab of SPM. Looks deserted sadly. Maybe still under COVID lockdown?



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  #25103  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 4:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Marty_Mcfly View Post
It doesn't seem to be an issue in other cities with similar number of hours of sunshine during the growing seasons. Great example being the other Saint John, in New Brunswick.

Plus if you're strictly talking about the natural Boreal forest with fir and spruce trees those species tend to not grow so high to begin with. Plus they also tend to be very slow growers even in the best of conditions. Check out some of the google streetview captures from northern Ontario like just outside Sudbury, they're not huge either. Definitely a bit taller than here, but not by too much. Much taller than the more exposed trees here though.

Of course, our really exposed southern coastal areas are so inhospitable for trees that they look more like the tundra or plains than anything else:
https://www.google.com/maps/@46.8699...7i13312!8i6656
Here is what it looks like 400 km north of Sudbury: https://www.google.ca/maps/@49.73443...7i13312!8i6656

This is the northernmost east-west road in Ontario, though Ontario's land continues for hundreds of km north of here.
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Last edited by Acajack; Jul 14, 2020 at 7:28 PM.
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  #25104  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 5:51 PM
Tancredi Tancredi is offline
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Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
We’re decently sunny by European standards. In an average year, we get 1633 hours of sunshine. That’s not far below the top 5 sunniest cities in Western Europe (where Munich, at 1,709 hours, is fifth).

It’s far sunnier than: Glasgow, Reykjavik, Birmingham, London, Manchester, Dublin, and Cologne.

Its decently sunnier than: Vaduz, Brussels, Hamburg, Vilnius.

And it’s only a little cloudier than: Oslo, Riga, Saint Petersburg, Prague, Moscow, Minsk, Ljubljana, Sarajevo.

None of these are known for their sunshine, of course, and Southern Europe is much sunnier - but we’re really not that cloudy by European standards.

Canada, though, is exceptionally sunny. I believe we’re dead last among its capitals.
It is true, however, these European cities have a winter semester with temperatures higher than those of Newfoundland and even summer is (at least in most of the cities you have indicated) is warmer. : Titanic:
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  #25105  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 5:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Marty_Mcfly View Post
It doesn't seem to be an issue in other cities with similar number of hours of sunshine during the growing seasons. Great example being the other Saint John, in New Brunswick.

Plus if you're strictly talking about the natural Boreal forest with fir and spruce trees those species tend to not grow so high to begin with. Plus they also tend to be very slow growers even in the best of conditions. Check out some of the google streetview captures from northern Ontario like just outside Sudbury, they're not huge either. Definitely a bit taller than here, but not by too much. Much taller than the more exposed trees here though.

Of course, our really exposed southern coastal areas are so inhospitable for trees that they look more like the tundra or plains than anything else:
https://www.google.com/maps/@46.8699...7i13312!8i6656
In fact, another consequence of your climate is also the average height of the trees
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  #25106  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 5:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Marty_Mcfly View Post
Of course, our really exposed southern coastal areas are so inhospitable for trees that they look more like the tundra or plains than anything else:
https://www.google.com/maps/@46.8699...7i13312!8i6656
Take that landscape, plant it on the west coast of Ireland, and there would be sheep everywhere. I wonder why the Irish and west country immigrants to Newfoundland never took any sheep along with them?
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  #25107  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 6:22 PM
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Take that landscape, plant it on the west coast of Ireland, and there would be sheep everywhere. I wonder why the Irish and west country immigrants to Newfoundland never took any sheep along with them?
They did - there are still lots of sheep and the like in settled areas such as Branch. We just very quickly switched to imported foods following WWII. There used to be sheep and cows etc. in central St. John’s even. And you can see farms on the hillsides around basically every town in old photos. They’re just all bungalows now. Since 1949, we went from highest food security in Canada to lowest. Youngest population to oldest etc. And not all bad, of course. We’re no longer the poorest.
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  #25108  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 6:41 PM
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In fact, another consequence of your climate is also the average height of the trees
Tree height varies on the island. If you drive from east to west across the island you can notice the trees getting taller (and growing straighter). Most of the tree growth in the central and western parts of the island are similar to what you'd see in the Maritimes. It's basically the coasts and peninsulas where the tree growth is stunted. It could be the soil differences but I also think exposure to wind has an effect as well.
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  #25109  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 7:11 PM
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Speaking of trees it is said that in my city, Palermo, there is the largest tree in Europe (in fact I think there are bigger trees), it is the Ficus macrophylla in square Marina.

Tree with a height of more than thirty meters and a circumference that exceeds twenty.
The tree is also very old because it was planted in 1863

https://www.palermotoday.it/cronaca/...ll'Inglese.

https://www.google.it/maps/place/Pia....3683042?hl=it

https://www.google.it/maps/place/Pia....3683042?hl=it

https://www.google.it/maps/place/Pia....3683042?hl=it


siciliafan.it


globochannel.com


avvenire.it


ilsicilia.it


wikimedia.org

https://www.floraitaliae.actaplantar...ic.php?t=59706




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  #25110  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 7:13 PM
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Originally Posted by goodgrowth View Post
Tree height varies on the island. If you drive from east to west across the island you can notice the trees getting taller (and growing straighter). Most of the tree growth in the central and western parts of the island are similar to what you'd see in the Maritimes. It's basically the coasts and peninsulas where the tree growth is stunted. It could be the soil differences but I also think exposure to wind has an effect as well.
Probably the very strong and constant winds of your coastal areas have a limiting effect for the growth of trees
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  #25111  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 7:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tancredi View Post
Speaking of trees it is said that in my city, Palermo, there is the largest tree in Europe (in fact I think there are bigger trees), it is the Ficus macrophylla in square Marina.

Tree with a height of more than thirty meters and a circumference that exceeds twenty.
The tree is also very old because it was planted in 1863

https://www.palermotoday.it/cronaca/...ll'Inglese.

https://www.google.it/maps/place/Pia....3683042?hl=it

https://www.google.it/maps/place/Pia....3683042?hl=it

https://www.google.it/maps/place/Pia....3683042?hl=it


siciliafan.it


globochannel.com


avvenire.it


ilsicilia.it


wikimedia.org

https://www.floraitaliae.actaplantar...ic.php?t=59706





That tree is magnificent. It reminds me of the Gran Gomero in Buenos Aires.
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  #25112  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 7:55 PM
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There's nothing like that ficus tree in Canada.

There are some ancient cedars in BC:


And here is a large beech tree in SW Ontario:
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  #25113  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 7:56 PM
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Finally, EC's week-long forecast for YEG shows rain on only one night. A mix of sun and cloud everyday, thankfully. Temps could be higher, but at least they're right around average (H 21-23, L 12-14).
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  #25114  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 8:18 PM
dreambrother808 dreambrother808 is offline
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
That tree is magnificent. It reminds me of the Gran Gomero in Buenos Aires.
I immediately thought of Buenos Aires as well.
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  #25115  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 8:25 PM
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This just goes to show how different summer has been in BC/Alberta compared to virtually the entire rest of the country.

Even Inuvik in the North having the same amount of 25C+ days as Calgary.
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  #25116  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 8:34 PM
Tancredi Tancredi is offline
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Acajack
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That tree is magnificent. It reminds me of the Gran Gomero in Buenos Aires.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dreambrother808 View Post
I immediately thought of Buenos Aires as well.
Can you post photos? :Saluti:
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  #25117  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 8:35 PM
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Originally Posted by flar View Post
There's nothing like that ficus tree in Canada.

There are some ancient cedars in BC:


And here is a large beech tree in SW Ontario:
WOW! It is very high! How many meters is it high? :scappa:
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  #25118  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 9:19 PM
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WOW! It is very high! How many meters is it high? :scappa:
I don't know, the beech tree was probably about 30m tall. Here is a blog about that tree, which unfortunately is now dead
https://pawsnaturenuggets.blogspot.c...r-citizen.html

According to the blog, the trunk was 95cm in diameter and the tree was over 250 years old
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  #25119  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 10:48 PM
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I don't know, the beech tree was probably about 30m tall. Here is a blog about that tree, which unfortunately is now dead
https://pawsnaturenuggets.blogspot.c...r-citizen.html

According to the blog, the trunk was 95cm in diameter and the tree was over 250 years old
Is dead? I'm sorry!
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  #25120  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2020, 10:56 PM
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27.8C here today with a mix of sun and cloud. A gorgeous summer day.

Heading up to 29C tomorrow, then 27C on Thursday, 31C on Friday, 32C on Saturday and 30C on Sunday.

Next week is all 28-31C each day, humidity 35-40C.

Last edited by travis3000; Jul 15, 2020 at 12:34 AM.
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