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  #10361  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2019, 3:01 AM
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I want to see a video of him eating a steak with plastic straws and incandescent light bulbs in it! "Sure, I look like a moron, but look at how natural my skin looks in this rich, golden hue of tungsten filament lighting!"
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  #10362  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2019, 3:14 AM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
Liberal support is already extremely soft and is currently around the minimum required for a minority; anything that gives already unenthusiastic voters one more reason to say "okay, that was the final straw, I'm not going to be voting for that" can make a pretty big difference in the FPTP electoral map.
Actually, because of where their support is located, the Liberals at slightly lower than the Conservatives are flirting with majority territory.
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  #10363  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2019, 4:05 AM
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  #10364  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2019, 4:16 AM
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Originally Posted by jmt18325 View Post
Actually, because of where their support is located, the Liberals at slightly lower than the Conservatives are flirting with majority territory.
That doesn't contradict anything I said - currently, Lib support is at that spot where small changes in support can produce huge changes in FPTP outcome, so if some people decide to stay home over the blackface thing then it could have a significant impact on FPTP results.
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  #10365  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 4:26 AM
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I am surprised that Elizabeth May is stepping down.
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  #10366  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 5:22 AM
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I am surprised that Elizabeth May is stepping down.
I'm not surprised but I'm glad she is and I'm also glad she did so voluntarily at a high point for the party and not wait till she is eventually kicked out.

I have never really been her biggest fan but I do admire her dedication and plain spoken manner both of which are rare for politicians. Even though the party only got 3 seats, she has turned the Greens from being a niche also-ran to a true national political force.

She has served the party and her constituents well but after 13 years as leader, it's time for her to step aside and let someone else take the reigns.
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  #10367  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 1:43 PM
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An interesting CBC piece on the creation this week of a new "party" in the Senate.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/tas...orms-1.5347242
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  #10368  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 10:09 PM
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Kudos for Trudeau as it is a very good start to creating an effective Upper House but it is only that, a start. Until the Senators are voted into office they have no moral authority to govern or even fundamentally change any laws proposed by Parliament.

One of the problems of truly reforming the Senate into an effective Upper House based upon an elected Senate is that {and correct me if I am wrong} such a change from appointed to elected Senators would require the approval of the Senators themselves. Effectively Senators would be asked to potentially create a system where they would lose their jobs. Of course an elected Senate could be phased-in where any new openings are elected and just wait for the older appointees to die off.
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  #10369  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 10:32 PM
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Originally Posted by ssiguy View Post
Kudos for Trudeau as it is a very good start to creating an effective Upper House but it is only that, a start. Until the Senators are voted into office they have no moral authority to govern or even fundamentally change any laws proposed by Parliament.

One of the problems of truly reforming the Senate into an effective Upper House based upon an elected Senate is that {and correct me if I am wrong} such a change from appointed to elected Senators would require the approval of the Senators themselves. Effectively Senators would be asked to potentially create a system where they would lose their jobs. Of course an elected Senate could be phased-in where any new openings are elected and just wait for the older appointees to die off.
I find that Canadians sometimes seem to think that you could have an elected Senate without any other changes. The difficult issue would not be elections and things that flow from elections, it would be what powers an elected Senate would have, from where they would take those powers (House of Commons? Royal Prerogative?), and what constitutional changes (shudder) would be required to implement the new dispensation? If the response is that an elected Senate would have the same powers as the appointed Senate, one must really ask "what's the point"?
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  #10370  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2019, 1:34 AM
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I think we should do what the Americans did until the 1930s, and have the provinces elect or appoint them.
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  #10371  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2019, 3:16 AM
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I think we should do what the Americans did until the 1930s, and have the provinces elect or appoint them.
I could see an argument for appointment by the provinces. Election by province would raise the same issues I noted above. They would also be expensive for candidates as constituencies would, one assume, be very large (if provinces were divided into constituencies).
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  #10372  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2019, 3:30 AM
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Quebec is divided into constituencies and senators are appointed from them, all the others are at-large but generally they make sure all regions are represented. My region of Ontario is represented by everyone's favourite senator, Lynn Beyak!

So, maybe you can understand why I would rather elect them.
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  #10373  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2019, 4:59 AM
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I think we should do what the Americans did until the 1930s, and have the provinces elect or appoint them.
1930s? 17th Amendment was passed in 1913. Any senators appointed after that were due to death, resignation or expulsion.

Anyway, huge NO to appointed senators.
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  #10374  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2019, 5:01 AM
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I could see an argument for appointment by the provinces. Election by province would raise the same issues I noted above. They would also be expensive for candidates as constituencies would, one assume, be very large (if provinces were divided into constituencies).
Senators would represent the entire province. Isn't that the case now?
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  #10375  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2019, 5:04 AM
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Senators would represent the entire province. Isn't that the case now?
I think it varies. In Ontario, at least, Senators are able to designate a region that they "represent", though not all do. I don't think it actually means anything beyond a nod to the old home town.
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  #10376  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2019, 5:42 AM
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I oppose elected senators, talk about a way to slow government even more, I;d support abolishing the senate far before supporting electing senators. The less direct democracy the better, the more stable.
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  #10377  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2019, 3:03 PM
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Originally Posted by ssiguy View Post
Kudos for Trudeau as it is a very good start to creating an effective Upper House but it is only that, a start. Until the Senators are voted into office they have no moral authority to govern or even fundamentally change any laws proposed by Parliament.

One of the problems of truly reforming the Senate into an effective Upper House based upon an elected Senate is that {and correct me if I am wrong} such a change from appointed to elected Senators would require the approval of the Senators themselves. Effectively Senators would be asked to potentially create a system where they would lose their jobs. Of course an elected Senate could be phased-in where any new openings are elected and just wait for the older appointees to die off.
Senate approval is not required for constitutional amendments.
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  #10378  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2019, 10:44 PM
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https://business.financialpost.com/o...6-5845cf2699b9

Quote:
Leaving the Canada Pension Plan could be Alberta’s next shot across Ottawa’s bow
Don Braid: The idea, which could hike CPP premiums 10% for the rest of Canadians, is attracting a lot of interest among Albertans...Withdrawing from CPP is a provincial right. It can be exercised without constitutional or legal challenge.

And as Kenney surely knows, Pexit would terrify the federal policy-makers who helped pile misfortune on Alberta.

All within our treasured federal system, of course.
This seems like a smart idea for Alberta and a bad idea for Canada.
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  #10379  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2019, 10:59 PM
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Scheer should resign before the April convention. He looks so weak now with so many in the party openly wanting a change and so few enthusiastically endorsing him. Pull a Joe Clark and if the tories win next time around he can be a dignified foreign affairs minister or something.
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  #10380  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2019, 11:19 PM
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https://business.financialpost.com/o...6-5845cf2699b9



This seems like a smart idea for Alberta and a bad idea for Canada.
No it doesn't. Fuck that. The Albertan government has zero credibilty in regards to responsible stewardship of financial resources, they'll build a ponzi scheme. On the other hand, the CPP is without question one of the most successful soveriegn wealth funds. If I have to be forced to put my money in a government scheme, I want my money in the CPP, not Jason Kenney's bullshit ponzi scheme.
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