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  #761  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2019, 11:14 PM
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Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
Is there a problem with relations with the Metis? Didn't they win the lottery a few years ago with the SCC decision?
I meant that if the Macdonald government had allowed the Metis to own their land and continue with their government and have the settlers assimilate into the Metis culture there was the potential of much less problems today. Then they wouldn't of had to take the government to court.
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  #762  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2019, 12:25 AM
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  #763  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2019, 12:47 AM
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It is quite interesting that - barring some catastrophic event - a few countries like Canada will have the control over its population levels as an easily controllable immigration target of government.

Other places like Japan and South Korea pretty much are at the whim of their fertility rates. In these cases, the demographic shifts look much more daunting.

The next 50 years will be interesting.
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  #764  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2019, 2:05 AM
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Originally Posted by wave46 View Post
It is quite interesting that - barring some catastrophic event - a few countries like Canada will have the control over its population levels as an easily controllable immigration target of government.

Other places like Japan and South Korea pretty much are at the whim of their fertility rates. In these cases, the demographic shifts look much more daunting.

The next 50 years will be interesting.
Japan's population is falling and expected to continue falling for the rest of this century, I believe.
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  #765  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2019, 2:08 AM
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Japan's population is falling and expected to continue falling for the rest of this century, I believe.
That's exactly what I meant. It will be unprecedented in the history of the world to have a population aging at the rate it is and also declining.

How they cope with that change will be interesting.
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  #766  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2019, 1:10 PM
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That's exactly what I meant. It will be unprecedented in the history of the world to have a population aging at the rate it is and also declining.

How they cope with that change will be interesting.
I don't get the sense that there is any particular degree of concern coming out of Japan... i.e. they'd rather live with the population downturn than start letting foreigners settle there.
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  #767  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2019, 1:25 PM
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I don't get the sense that there is any particular degree of concern coming out of Japan... i.e. they'd rather live with the population downturn than start letting foreigners settle there.
The number of foreigners living in Japan remains modest but has been growing for a number of years now, no?
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  #768  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2019, 1:32 PM
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The number of foreigners living in Japan remains modest but has been growing for a number of years now, no?
I did a lot of reasearch a few years ago as I was interested to move to Japan, at least for a few years. Unless things have changed since then, the only job opportunities for foreigners in Japan other than working at embassies/consulates was to teach English. That was something like 99% of the job opportunities for foreigners. Even foreigners with a decent knowledge of Japanese could not land other jobs. The lack of job opportunities is certainly an issue for whoever is interested to move to Japan. That being said, maybe things are starting to change.
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  #769  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2019, 1:39 PM
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I don't get the sense that there is any particular degree of concern coming out of Japan... i.e. they'd rather live with the population downturn than start letting foreigners settle there.
Not so much concern for ordinary people, but quite a concern for government. Elderly citizens require a lot more social services and pay less taxes than their working age counterparts.

But yes, the cultural vibe is that out of the 2 choices, population decline is the preferred option.

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The number of foreigners living in Japan remains modest but has been growing for a number of years now, no?
My understanding is that it has been growing, but in a very limited fashion. They've always been viewed as a 'temporary' solution to filling holes in the low-end labour market, so they have barriers to becoming citizens.

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Originally Posted by le calmar View Post
I did a lot of reasearch a few years ago as I was interested to move to Japan, at least for a few years. Unless things have changed since then, the only job opportunities for foreigners in Japan other than working at embassies/consulates was to teach English. That was something like 99% of the job opportunities for foreigners. Even foreigners with a decent knowledge of Japanese could not land other jobs. The lack of job opportunities is certainly an issue for whoever is interested to move to Japan. That being said, maybe things are starting to change.
I believe that one will have the best chance at obtaining employment in Japan via a foreign company operating in Japan, not a domestic one.
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  #770  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2019, 6:19 PM
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1755 map:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/nsarch...9713/sizes/3k/

I think at this time New Hampshire and Maine were a part of Massachusetts. Maine is just a tiny area and some of the territory between Maine and New Brunswick seems to be labelled as Abenaki. You can also see a few areas labelled "Mik maks". Gaspé was a part of Nova Scotia for a long time but Cape Breton was not since it was controlled by France long after Britain had taken over mainland NS.

The English territory runs right up to the St. Lawrence. But I would guess there was French settlement on the south shore around Quebec City in this era? Maybe this border was aspirational.

The main road in this map goes from Halifax to Fort Edward then on to a place labelled Kobequid, which today is Truro. There was also a road to Annapolis Royal that was under construction around the 1760's or 1770's. There is a stretch of land in the Annapolis Valley labelled "French inhabitants".

Fort Lawrence around the present-day NS/NB border is the English fort while Beauséjour was the French counterpart. Today that is the Moncton/Sackville/Amherst area. Petquecheck is Petitcodiac.

The Saint John label is a bit confusing. Ft Saint John? P. St John?
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  #771  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2019, 7:28 PM
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1755 map:
I think at this time New Hampshire and Maine were a part of Massachusetts. Maine is just a tiny area and some of the territory between Maine and New Brunswick seems to be labelled as Abenaki. You can also see a few areas labelled "Mik maks". Gaspé was a part of Nova Scotia for a long time but Cape Breton was not since it was controlled by France long after Britain had taken over mainland NS.
Abenaki are a tribe of Indians. You can see a reference to them in the note that appears around the portage between the Chaudière and Kennebeck Rivers:

"Indian & French Rendez v[o]us. Extremely prop[e]r for a Fort, which w[o]u[l]d restrain the French & cub [curb?] the Abenakki I[n]dians."

Quote:
The English territory runs right up to the St. Lawrence. But I would guess there was French settlement on the south shore around Quebec City in this era? Maybe this border was aspirational.
That tended to be the case. If you were going to make a case for a border in a dispute-settling mechanism later, it wouldn't help if your side had previously produced maps that didn't identify the land as yours.

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The Saint John label is a bit confusing. Ft Saint John? P. St John?
Pt St John - Port of St. John. There is a bad scan stitch at that point.
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  #772  
Old Posted Oct 28, 2019, 12:22 AM
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Present-day VT was disputed between NH and NY at the time. I guess it depended on who exactly did the map.

The Eastern Townships of QC are pretty incorrect on that map (the configuration of the rivers), though that's to be expected I guess.

The south shore of Quebec City was inhabited since the 1600s (by Canadiens; by natives since way before that, obviously). BTW whoever did that map completely misplaced Beaumont - it's quite a bit further east. (They put it even west of downtown Lévis.)

In Beaumont, this (still-intact) 1720s church was already about three decades old when that map was drawn:

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89..._(Qu%C3%A9bec)

... and the "news" that they were Americans would have been a surprise to the residents, no doubt.
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  #773  
Old Posted Oct 28, 2019, 12:30 AM
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Some weird mistakes too. For example, Champlain is east of Bécancour/the mouth of the Bécancour river, while this map places it west of it. Anyone who has navigated the river must be aware of that fact, if they're even aware of the existence of those places...? (in other words, omitting them seems much more reasonable than misplacing them; I'd rather have a map with only Quebec City on it, than a map that places Montreal downriver from Quebec City - I could explain away the former but not the latter.)
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  #774  
Old Posted Oct 28, 2019, 1:31 AM
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You think that's bad, check out the great lakes:



Man, they were so off.

BTW borders back then weren't hard borders like they were today, there was a core area which was under firm control of the people who claimed it, and a frontier area beyond that where they had influence but not much control. Walking from one "country" to another was easy, there was no border to cross and you'd only know exactly where you were by asking someone or observing local customs. The makers of that map of Nova Scotia probably decided that British influence ended at the St. Lawrence, but in reality they likely didn't settle much near there at the time it was made. The hard border was usually the actual city walls, or fort walls in the case of Poste Caministiquoyan on the map I posted. French control "covered" that area, but in reality, they only had control of the Fort and its immediate surroundings.
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  #775  
Old Posted Oct 28, 2019, 2:11 AM
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That's impressively accurate to me. Everything is pretty much to scale or reasonably close to it.

(In the context, seems clear to me that slightly misshapen lakes or rivers is a much more forgivable cartography "error" than placing river cities in the wrong order.)
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  #776  
Old Posted Oct 28, 2019, 2:51 AM
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When you consider what they had to work with, laughing at these map-makers is like making fun of 10th place finishers at the Olympics.
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  #777  
Old Posted Oct 28, 2019, 11:04 PM
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thanks
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  #778  
Old Posted Oct 29, 2019, 12:24 AM
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Cook's 1775 Chart of Newfoundland, pretty goddamn accurate if you ask me.



Strait of Belle Isle, surveyed by Cook in 1769


Cook's charting skills allowed the Royal Navy to sail up the St. Lawrence and get past the guns overlooking the river and land troops up river of Quebec.

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  #779  
Old Posted Oct 29, 2019, 8:49 PM
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Between the 1750s and 1770s, headway was finally being made in solving the problem of the longitude, which might have made a difference to the accuracy of some maps. Also, Newfoundland was by then very familiar territory, while the information for a map of the Great Lakes would have been patched together from many different sources of varying quality.
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  #780  
Old Posted Oct 29, 2019, 9:04 PM
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One cute one... occasionally, when the British press covers us, they often tilt the map as strongly as our own local weather forecasts do.


https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...dland-labrador

It's still not fully accurate (our actual southernmost point is still tilted nearly enough to be the easternmost on this map), but much better than Canadian media does.
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Last edited by SignalHillHiker; Oct 29, 2019 at 9:17 PM.
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