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  #601  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2019, 12:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Not generally so, no.

Just outdated and inaccurate.
Why inaccurate though? I kinda sensed that Sugar Sammy was using that term for fun.
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  #602  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2019, 1:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Dengler Avenue View Post
Why inaccurate though? I kinda sensed that Sugar Sammy was using that term for fun.
It is inaccurate to, as people often do, use Hindu as a synonym for Indian.
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  #603  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2019, 11:36 AM
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Ah okay. I was wondering about that too.
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  #604  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2019, 9:24 PM
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may i ask what difference it would make if i used Car or Parce que?

will anyone care if i just stick to parce que?
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  #605  
Old Posted Aug 11, 2019, 3:09 AM
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may i ask what difference it would make if i used Car or Parce que?

will anyone care if i just stick to parce que?
I see Car as a more well spoken ''Parce que'' but in the daily language, people will rarely use car.
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  #606  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2019, 8:03 PM
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"Quebecois French Required for the Job"

https://www.facebook.com/tfoONfr/vid...2wLG8bvftgpWr6

I just chanced upon this video from half a year ago. I haven't watched the whole thing yet but so far it seems interesting~
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  #607  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2019, 8:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Dengler Avenue View Post
I just chanced upon this video from half a year ago. I haven't watched the whole thing yet but so far it seems interesting~
This was basically about Ontario. I wonder if the same phenomenon exists in Quebec to the same degree, and if it really is about the callers or if it's just something some recruiters imagine is needed. At times you see that the guy was talking to people in English and looking at English job ads.

I've said before that English Canadians tend to make a huge deal out of Canadian French being a special thing while they don't really think about say Canadian English vs. UK or Australian English in the same way. I could imagine an Anglophone recruiter knowing just enough about this to be dangerous and being convinced that a particular dialect or accent should be a job requirement.

I was in Europe recently and I encountered expat (Anglophone) Canadians there who regretted the fact that they couldn't speak French because they were taught Canadian French instead of standard European French. In reality they probably never learned much French at all, and it's not realistic to expect to learn a language over a few years in school and then live as a native speaker decades later using that knowledge.
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  #608  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2019, 8:53 PM
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Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
This was basically about Ontario. I wonder if the same phenomenon exists in Quebec to the same degree, and if it really is about the callers or if it's just something some recruiters imagine is needed. At times you see that the guy was talking to people in English and looking at English job ads.
I think you are absolutely right, it's something recruiters imagine is needed. Based on the various accents I hear when I call any organisation's customer service, private or public, the accent doesn't seem to be important when someone is hired in a call centre in Quebec.

Quote:
Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
I was in Europe recently and I encountered expat (Anglophone) Canadians there who regretted the fact that they couldn't speak French because they were taught Canadian French instead of standard European French. In reality they probably never learned much French at all, and it's not realistic to expect to learn a language over a few years in school and then live as a native speaker decades later using that knowledge.
It's the same French anyway. In it's written form, Quebec French is 99% similar to French from France. And as Acajack has mentioned a few times, basically, Quebec French is to France French what Texas English is to British English. Some expressions are different, but it's still mutually intelligible.

When I travel with my family and we meet French families (happened a few times in Slovenia and Croatia this summer), my kids play with the French kids and it usually takes a long while before they even get a comment on their accent. And then it can be "are you from Belgium or Switzerland?". Or "C'est étrange, il est doux votre accent!" (by which they probably mean "I'm surprised that you are from Quebec and I can understand you just fine".

With Youtube (my kids watch lots of French Youtubers) and easy international communications, the differences in accents and vocabulary tends to flatten over time, I noticed.
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  #609  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2019, 9:14 PM
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Originally Posted by begratto View Post
When I travel with my family and we meet French families (happened a few times in Slovenia and Croatia this summer), my kids play with French kids and it usually takes a long while before they even get a comment on their accent. And then it can be "are you from Belgium or Switzerland?". Or "C'est étrange, il est doux votre accent!" (by which they probably mean "I'm surprised that I can understand you just fine".

With Youtube (my kids watch lots of French Youtubers) and easy international communications, the differences in accents and vocabulary tends to flatten over time, I noticed.
As far as my own experience goes, I grew up speaking English and French when I was a kid and did a mix of schooling in both languages while moving around from place to place but now I lived in Vancouver and use French about once every 2 years. I was just in France and Belgium and had a bunch of conversations and smaller interactions that seemingly went fine. If I can do it a person who lives in Quebec and speaks French every day definitely can. French TV and movies or in-person conversations remind me of UK English vs. Canadian English. Some words are different and it can be a bit less clear but it's not a big deal, and if you spent any length of time in the other environment you'd pick up the differences very quickly.

One thing that was a little awkward is that my travelling companion doesn't speak much French, and if we spoke English together in front of service staff they often asssumed we wanted service in English but often their English was bad or nonexistent. I have found that switching to English with them is the wrong thing to do in those situations. It's better to continue speak French.
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  #610  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2019, 2:21 PM
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Is “On s’en fout” more or less a French French term? Or do people say that in Québec too?
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  #611  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2019, 2:29 PM
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Seen in Ottawa recently.

English - How are we doing? Let us know!

French - .... Faites-le nous savoir!

Correct? Clumsy? Correct but clumsy?
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  #612  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2019, 3:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Dengler Avenue View Post
Is “On s’en fout” more or less a French French term? Or do people say that in Québec too?
Oui, "On s'en fout" is common in Quebec. We also say "on s'en sacre".
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  #613  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2019, 5:33 PM
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Oui, "On s'en fout" is common in Quebec. We also say "on s'en sacre".
on s'en caliss, on s'en criss, but , on s'en tabarnack , mon préféré
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  #614  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2019, 6:23 PM
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Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
Seen in Ottawa recently.

English - How are we doing? Let us know!

French - .... Faites-le nous savoir!

Correct? Clumsy? Correct but clumsy?
I don’t know the answer, but I don’t want your comment unnoticed.
I can’t come with an example on the spot right now, but sometimes, even in a mandatorily bilingual city like Ottawa, the French translation makes even a learner like me shake my head...
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Originally Posted by begratto View Post
Oui, "On s'en fout" is common in Quebec. We also say "on s'en sacre".
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreaterMontréal View Post
on s'en caliss, on s'en criss, but , on s'en tabarnack , mon préféré
Okay relaxe, garz. Je n’ai posé aucune question à propos des sacre. Merci néanmoins.
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  #615  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2019, 6:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Dengler Avenue View Post
Is “On s’en fout” more or less a French French term? Or do people say that in Québec too?
Slight tinge of French French in there still, though. A more standard Québécois formulation would be "on s'en sac'". On s'en criss is stronger / expresses ever so slightly more anger/irritation (still mild enough), on s'en câliss even more, and on s'en tabarnak even even more.
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  #616  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2019, 6:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dengler Avenue View Post
I don’t know the answer, but I don’t want your comment unnoticed.
I can’t come with an example on the spot right now, but sometimes, even in a mandatorily bilingual city like Ottawa, the French translation makes even a learner like me shake my head...
I noticed it, but I expected Acajack to answer.

I would say it is correct. However one could simply say "faites-nous savoir".
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  #617  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2019, 6:39 PM
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Slight tinge of French French in there still, though. A more standard Québécois formulation would be "on s'en sac'". On s'en criss is stronger / expresses ever so slightly more anger/irritation (still mild enough), on s'en câliss even more, and on s'en tabarnak even even more.
Looks like there really isn’t a way around sacre, eh?
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  #618  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2019, 6:41 PM
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Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
Seen in Ottawa recently.

English - How are we doing? Let us know!

French - .... Faites-le nous savoir!

Correct? Clumsy? Correct but clumsy?
"So literally perfect as to almost appear clumsy from a Spoken Quebec French POV" would be your answer
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  #619  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2019, 6:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
Seen in Ottawa recently.

English - How are we doing? Let us know!

French - .... Faites-le nous savoir!

Correct? Clumsy? Correct but clumsy?
It's correct and neutral. Although in informal speech, you'll sometimes hear things flipped (eg "donne-moi-le" instead of the more standard "donne-le-moi"). Generally, the direct object comes first and the indirect second. In this case "le" is the thing being made known, so it's the direct object. "Nous" is the person to which something is being made known (à nous), so it's indirect. So when putting it all together, "Faites-le nous savoir" is in the correct order.

But honestly, if you're learning and just speaking in a non-formal context, people will understand you no matter what order you put it in and won't flinch if you get it wrong. It's not a widely-known rule.
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  #620  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2019, 6:42 PM
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Looks like there really isn’t a way around sacre, eh?
There is. "S'pas important" (written "Ce n'est pas important"...) ou encore "pas grave" ou "dérange pas" ou "pas besoin" etc
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