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  #961  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2021, 5:28 AM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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Downtown Albuquerque News reported on Tuesday that the city is in negotiations with a company to put a new roof and solar array on the largest structure at the Rail Yards, the Machine Shop. It says that the company will agree to do this in lieu of rent, which I take to mean that it will be a tenant in the structure. If so, this would be huge for the redevelopment of the Rail Yards!

https://downtownalbuquerquenews.com/

Quote:
The city is in negotiations with an unnamed firm to install a solar array on the largest building at the Rail Yards, according to Lawrence Rael, a top deputy to Mayor Tim Keller. Under the deal, the city would accept a new roof on the building in lieu of rent.

"That's what I'm trying to negotiate with them right now," Rael said, adding that "this is all very preliminary."

Rael did not specifically name the machine shop in his remarks, but Ed Adams, who oversees the day-to-day renovation work for the city, said the roof in question was just under 150,000 square feet, which fits the dimensions of that building. No other structure at the Rail Yards comes close to its size.

...

Rael hinted that the arrangement was made possible by the Community Solar Act, a law passed by the state legislature earlier this year that allows utility customers to band together to build solar projects away from their actual properties and receive credits on their bills in the process.

He said to expect an update on the deal in about a month.


The only other thing I can think of with that wording, especially the bit about the Community Solar Act, is that perhaps this is a company that is wanting the solar array solely for energy generating purposes and won't be a tenant of the actual building. I guess we'll see what exactly this deal might entail early next year.


The city has been renovating and rehabilitating the structures at the Rail Yards in order to get them ready for possible tenants. That includes recently putting new roofs on many of the structures and even getting some to a warm shell state. It has also included environmental remediation of the site, which has things like creosote soil contamination to deal with.

Below are pics of the work done so far from Instagram.






https://www.instagram.com/p/CVgjOZHPqkh/




https://www.instagram.com/p/CVgiszTPEz8/






https://www.instagram.com/p/CVB16gUrY08/


https://www.instagram.com/p/CUXtJihrss-/

The city is seeking public input on the design of the Rail Trail. They've released renderings and a map showing the vision of what the trail could end up like.

https://www.krqe.com/news/politics-g...-trail-design/

https://www.cabq.gov/mra/rail-trail







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  #962  
Old Posted Dec 13, 2021, 3:15 PM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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A couple more pics of the Presbyterian Hospital expansion originally posted by Pickling over at SSC.



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  #963  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2021, 7:31 PM
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Albuquerque Business First has a report about Project Charli in Los Lunas. They weren't able to get confirmation that it's an Amazon project, but they did get details about the cost, size and an idea of the number of jobs for the project. It's a more than $114 million project that will encompass 1.5 million sq ft and create "hundreds" of jobs.

https://www.bizjournals.com/albuquer...los-lunas.html

Quote:
A commercial development company with ties to Amazon has broken ground on its latest New Mexico project. This one, located in Los Lunas, is valued at more than $100 million and expected to create hundreds of jobs, according to building permits and sources close to the deal.

The tenant of the project remains a mystery but goes by the code name "Project Charlie" on building permits and by the parties involved.

Phoenix-based BH DevCo is the development firm behind the project. It also was behind the two Amazon projects in Albuquerque: a fulfillment center and a sortation center on the Westside.

BH DevCo tasked the Colliers International Albuquerque brokerage team of Bob Feinberg and Tom Jones to find a site for its next project in New Mexico, the brokers told Business First. That new site is located to the west of Facebook's data center campus off of New Mexico State Road 6.

Los Lunas senior economic developer Kristen Gamboa said a distribution center is under construction at the site. She declined to disclose the name of the tenant BH DevCo is building for.

A drive past the site reveals signage for Minneapolis-based general contractor Ryan Companies along the fence. The land is located at 6251 Pioneer Trail NW. A search of Valencia County parcels shows Huning Limited Partnership as the owner.

Talks between BH DevCo and the village of Los Lunas began around April 2021, Gamboa said. Months later, BH DevCo's director of development Josh Rogers — as an acting agent for Huning Limited Partnership — requested approval from the village to amend the parcel tract for the site in October. The request was made to separate the parcel into two tracts of land for a proposed commercial development. The motion was passed on a 3-0 vote, according to minutes from the village council.
...

According to a building permit issued to Ryan Companies by the New Mexico Construction Industries Division, The valuation of Project Charlie is more than $114 million and will encompass 1.5 million square feet, according to the permit issued to Ryan Companies.
...

BH DevCo started pushing dirt in September before breaking ground on the site in November, Gamboa said. She expects the project to wrap up before the end of 2022.


Even though Business First wasn't able to get confirmation, I'm quite sure that this is an Amazon project. Apart from the companies involved being the same as the ones who built the Albuquerque and Bernalillo County Amazon facilities, remember that the person who first revealed this project to us on Instagram said that it was an Amazon project. A few days ago he posted more pics of the site and again referred to it as an Amazon project. He's apparently helping to document the construction with another drone operator whom he says has a contract for the footage. It's likely that person is who provides the drone footage to the account on Vimeo which posts the progress videos for Ryan Companies.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CXWfZZiP_Ir/







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  #964  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2021, 7:51 PM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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A couple of nice pics showing UNM Hospital and the tower cranes for its expansion. They were posted earlier this month on Instagram by UNM accounts.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CW45pOOLq4U/



https://www.instagram.com/p/CXJ3xQaN3hW/



The most recent snap from the construction cam for the UNM Hospital expansion. It looks like concrete walls are being poured on the eastern side of the structure. I'm a little confused because this doesn't line up with the renderings which show glass in these places. But perhaps this side will eventually be underground, which would fit with the slope of the site and a partially underground level.

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  #965  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2022, 8:43 AM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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Below is a neat old video clip of Albuquerque from 1914 that's included in a short piece from the Albuquerque Museum Photo Archives channel on YouTube. It was shared to the Albuquerque Memories Facebook page yesterday. It shows Central Avenue between 2nd and 3rd streets. I was really happy to see it because I've always hoped Albuquerque would have an equivalent to the famous "A Trip Down Market Street" video of San Francisco from 1906. This may be the closest we'll ever get to that for Albuquerque.

Video Link


Here's the image from 1915 that they showed in the video as well. It's looking east down Central Avenue from 4th Street. Central Avenue had only just been renamed from Railroad Avenue three years earlier in 1912.



New Mexico of course joined the Union in 1912 as well. Thursday was the state's 110th birthday! Below is the graphic that the Governor shared on her social media to mark the occasion.

https://twitter.com/Michelle4NM/stat...90244616327168

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  #966  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2022, 11:25 PM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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Happy Martin Luther King Jr. Day! Unfortunately, due to the Omicron surge, the annual march down Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue to Civic Plaza had to be canceled this year. However, I wanted to post and highlight the recent addition to Albuquerque's MLK memorial at 1st and Tijeras. It's a mural by local artist Noe Barnett located under the Convention Center parking structure entrance ramps. It was officially unveiled back in October. The existing memorial streetscape from 1994 was also repaired and refreshed, as it had fallen into a bit of disrepair.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CY1x_LaP5rp/





https://mobile.twitter.com/ProfBenav...82477165858816







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  #967  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2022, 11:43 PM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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In my next few posts I want to update and post a few things that I never got around to at the end of last year due to the holidays, etc.

Back in October the Los Ranchos Board of Trustees had an update about the Village Center project. The developer unveiled more renderings for the project, including the initial vision and visualization of what the barn-like structure will look like and include. It's planned to include the indoor marketplace with a microbrewery, food and retail pods, the community and educational spaces, an events and conference center, as well as a boutique hotel.

https://www.losranchosnm.gov/village-center-project





Renderings for the additional two apartment buildings were also revealed. It was said that all three apartment buildings will have over 200 units combined and that these two will include about 16-17 small, pod-like ground-floor commercial spaces of about 800 sq ft each, which they say have proved very successful at their other projects in Albuquerque.



There will also be outdoor spaces, with an iconic water tower-like structure at the corner of 4th and Osuna, and a distinctive landscape design in the middle of the parking area with trellises for the growing of hops for the microbrewery that will be included in the project. A windmill element and stylized oversized acequia compuertas as entrance structures will also be included. These buildings will also have the grain silo elements of the senior apartment building.



















The developer also presented an updated site plan for the project with slight changes that are mostly to do with the single family portion of the project.



In the update presentation there were also a few more renderings shown of the senior apartment building portion of the project.















The developer also revealed that they didn't get certain kinds of credits that they were hoping for from the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority for this portion of the project, but that they will now seek help from the county in the form of bonds. He said the construction timeline shouldn't be affected by the change in financing help for the senior housing portion of the project. He also said that all the apartments will now also be developed as one project.

Below is the recording of the Los Ranchos Board of Trustees meeting where the update on the Village Center project was presented. It starts at about the 43:22 mark.

Video Link


This is a really neat project! I hope the developer can make it happen as visualized in these renderings. They certainly have a good track record in Albuquerque, so that gives me quite a bit of hope that they will deliver with this project as they have in the past.
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  #968  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2022, 5:40 AM
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The Calle Cuarta project in the North Valley is moving forward and is now working its way through the city's development approval process at the Development Review Board. Below is a story about the project from KRQE back in late November. The City Council Finance Committee had just approved the development agreement including the donation of the Brown Property land and $3.5 million in Workforce Housing Trust Fund money to go towards the project. The project has a total price tag of $18 million. The full City Council approved the development agreement at its meeting on December 20th.

https://www.krqe.com/news/politics-g...moves-forward/



https://cabq.legistar.com/Legislatio...8-B3B8501BC119

https://www.yeshousing.org/future-projects/



The 42-unit Hope Village homeless supportive housing project is getting ready to open and welcome its first residents. KRQE had the story below about the project last week. The director of HopeWorks says that the city needs at least 5 or 6 more projects like this to serve this population. Hopefully the city and county will build more soon!

https://www.krqe.com/news/albuquerqu...-homelessness/



A couple of pics of the project by Pavilion Construction on Facebook as it was being completed late last year.

https://www.facebook.com/pavilionconstruction/





KRQE had a story earlier this month about affordable housing and rent increases in Albuquerque. The story includes a look at the Palladium Townhomes under construction Downtown.

https://www.krqe.com/news/albuquerqu...t-prices-soar/



They also had a story early last month about redevelopment projects by the city along the Central Avenue corridor and Downtown. It also included shots of the other side of the Palladium Townhomes project and also the ART station canopy under construction in East Downtown.

https://www.krqe.com/news/albuquerqu...tral-corridor/







Downtown Albuquerque News was on a break for most of December but returned at the beginning of this month and shared these construction pics from late November of the new International District station and the three new ART canopies under construction in historic districts east and west of Downtown. It said that the Old Town and West Downtown station canopies are now completed.

https://downtownalbuquerquenews.com/









The city's Albuquerque Housing Authority began construction last month on 54 new townhomes in Martineztown at Broadway and McKnight. It will replace an old city housing project that formerly occupied the land. Below is a layout and renderings of the project along with a video of the groundbreaking ceremony from Pavilion Construction on Facebook.

https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=935936187298176&_rdr







The city is also currently rehabbing and renovating an existing housing project with 96 units in Martineztown on Broadway north of Martin Luther King called the Commons at Martineztown. Below is a pic from mid-December of the project from Pavilion Construction on Facebook.

https://www.facebook.com/pavilioncon...7699652951544/



There's another current city housing authority project in the North I-25 corridor which I'm not sure is a rehab of the existing buildings or a tear down and new construction project. Pavilion Construction posted a pic in November that made it seem like a rehab but perhaps it was some kind of remediation in preparation for demolition.

https://www.facebook.com/pavilioncon...2779415443569/



Albuquerque Business First reported about it last summer, along with the Broadway and McKnight project, and it sounded like it was going to be a new construction project as well. Either way, it will have 59 units upon completion and is located at 6100 Harper Road NE.

https://www.bizjournals.com/albuquer...-projects.html

Quote:
Two affordable housing projects are set to break ground soon in Albuquerque.

Earlier this month, building permits were issued to agents of the Albuquerque Housing Authority for a new building at 6100 Harper Drive NE and multiple family buildings at 1878 Broadway Place NE. Pavilion Construction is the general contractor on both of the projects

Karl Smith, Pavilion's vice president of new construction, Karl Smith, confirmed to Business First that construction on both projects is "imminent." Construction on the Broadway Place project, known as Broadway McKnight, is expected to begin later this month, he said.

Linda Bridge, executive director of the Albuquerque Housing Authority, said the completion timeline for both is between 12 and 14 months.

Broadway McKnight will be made up of 26 townhome-style buildings. Each will contain between one and five units for a total of 54 units. The estimated construction cost is $9.7 million, according to Business First's weekly roundup of building permits earlier this month. The Hartman & Majewski Design Group is the project's architect.

The 59 units at 6100 Harper will be spread across 11 residential buildings. The estimated construction cost is $5.4 million, according to Business First's weekly roundup of building permits. Jeebs and Zuzu LLC is the project's architect.

The two projects — along with another it started last December called The Commons at Martineztown — are part of a plan that started five years ago to bring 950 affordable housing units to the area, Bridge said.
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  #969  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2022, 8:14 AM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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The Development Review Board at its meeting on December 3rd once again approved the apartment project at Barstow and Alameda NE.

https://documents.cabq.gov/planning/...20Decision.pdf



KRQE had a report about the project and its fierce opposition by the neighborhood. Something tells me they will try to continue fighting against it, they are absolutely ruthless and unrelenting.

https://www.krqe.com/news/albuquerqu...t-albuquerque/



Another apartment project that faced loud and tough opposition by NIMBYs but was ultimately approved looks like it may begin construction soon. The developers of the 209-unit Wintergreen Apartments on Golf Course Drive NW near Westside Boulevard have filed for building permits. It will consist of four 4-story buildings and a clubhouse structure.

https://posse.cabq.gov/posse/pub/lms...ctId=150768323











The 241-unit Sonata Trails apartments on the Westside received their building permits on December 21st and are under construction, with an inspection having occured the day after the main permit was issued. I haven't been able to find renderings of the project, but below is a screenshot from Google Maps showing the location of the project and a pic of the entrance to the overall Trails community where it will be built. It will have an address of 6700 Tree Line Avenue NW, which would be on the south side of an extension of that street east of Universe Boulevard.

https://posse.cabq.gov/posse/pub/lms...ctId=132990107





The Sonata Trails apartments will be townhouse-style apartments similar to the existing Cantata at the Trails apartments across Universe Boulevard. If you'll notice, there's a wedge-shaped piece of undeveloped land northwest of the existing Cantata buildings. That's planned to be a 52-unit townhouse apartment project as well. It's to be called the Adagio apartments and is currently seeking approvals before the Development Review Board.

It's been deferred countless times for over two years now due to neighborhood association issues with the design, color palette and the fact that it's not condos, as was originally envisioned. It most recently was deferred by the DRB on December 8th to their January 26th meeting. It originally was submitted to the DRB in April 2019, so coming up on three years. It just further illustrates how ridiculous the opposition to these projects can be and how long projects can be drawn out by deferrals.






Titan Development is planning another new apartment complex in the Far Northeast Heights. It submitted its plans to the Development Review Board on December 8th for a 105-unit project at Louisiana and Alameda NE. It's being called Allaso Louisiana and will feature a mostly 3-story structure.



In pre-development meetings with the neighborhood groups the design was changed from its original orientation and massing to accommodate a wider landscape buffer than what is required by the IDO rules. The end result is worse in my opinion. But developers are having to give concessions like these to try to win tepid approval from neighborhood groups and avoid the kind of rabid opposition seen with most projects that get proposed nowadays.





What's funny is that if you look at the small neighborhood/subdivision that the developer is trying to appease, they are the ones who had bad planning and feel out of place along that side of Alameda. Their subdivision was shoe-horned in next to a commercial property and an empty plot that was zoned for dense housing and mixed uses. They also apparently asked for a wider landscape buffer to compensate for the ridiculously small back yards that the developer of their community got away with.





The project as originally designed conformed to the IDO's form-based rules and made complete sense. It had its massing along the two main streets and stepped-down and put the parking, etc. towards the minor street and neighborhood edge, with a landscaping buffer directly adjacent to the neighborhood. Now the building has an awkward stepped effect along Alameda and a three-story massing facing the parking area along the minor street. The neighborhood demands made a mess of the design IMO.

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  #970  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2022, 7:39 AM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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Downtown Albuquerque News before it went on break in December had a story about developing housing in Downtown. They interviewed the developer of the Elevate project, as well as the developer of the Downtowner project. I was especially glad to see the Elevate developer confirm that the project is still in the works. It was a long story, so I'll just quote the portions where they talked to the two developers about their projects and the issues they face getting them built.

https://downtownalbuquerquenews.com/

Quote:
Single-family homes in the suburbs are often maligned as "cookie-cutter," but from a construction perspective at least, the shoe fits. Often working from a limited number of off-the-shelf blueprints, construction crews that are sometimes less specialized (and paid less to boot) can quickly move in, spread out their tools and materials, build relatively uncomplicated houses, and then efficiently move on to the next job, which itself is bound to look a lot like the last. Repeat that simple assembly line process for a couple or few decades, and you get Albuquerque's Westside.

But if you build a multi-family complex Downtown, the cookie-cutter becomes a 1,000-piece puzzle, and every one of those pieces has a cost.

You can see one of those complications playing out right now at Silver and Second, where Homewise is building a collection of townhomes just south of Silver Street Market (DAN, 6/22/21). As multi-family development goes, the project is on the small side, but it nonetheless requires a fantastic quantity of building materials, and so the non-profit developer has arranged to stage them on a vacant lot catty-corner to the job site. The city, which donated the land on which the townhomes are going, conveniently owns that vacant lot, too.

But that lot is not going to be vacant forever. The city is in negotiations with developer Jay Rembe, whose portfolio includes the Silver Lofts and many of the prominent new or refurbished structures in West Downtown, to put up nearly 200 apartments there.

So when it comes time to break ground, where is he supposed to stage all of his materials, given that the immediate area's supply of vacant lots will have run out?

To be sure, that is a problem that can be solved with creativity and good logistics, but it is also a problem that the suburban residential developers - with their comparatively small pile of materials and ample space within neighborhoods that may not even have residents yet -simply don't have.

The list goes on: Land costs are higher Downtown, and with space at a premium, parking structures can be essential but add cost - sometimes tens of thousands of dollars per space. Build high enough, and you'll be forced to use expensive metal framing rather than wood or perhaps even supplement the water pressure. If the project gets big enough, worker pay scales can go up.

"The higher you go the more complicated it gets," Rembe told DAN.

Add to that an inflation picture that has shaken the construction world particularly hard, driving up the cost of materials and delivery times, including specialty items more likely to be needed for a bigger apartment project.

"An elevator right now is a one-year lead item," said Scott Throckmorton, who is developing the 144-unit Elevate @ Lomas and Third project. He also pronounced labor availability these days as "suspect."

The improvisational and expensive nature of Downtown development is only heightened when it comes to renovating older and (possibly worn-down) buildings or repurposing, say, former offices into residences.

"That doesn't fit into a nice formula," said Mark Baker, who repurposed a former Sears built in 1936 into the offices, apartments, and the 505 Central Food Hall and more recently purchased a former convent at Seventh and Copper that he aims to turn into 15 apartments (DAN, 11/8/21). "Not all developers are willing to step into that territory."

Finding a place to build in the first place isn't easy either. There are plenty of vacant buildings, but few are actually for sale, and the situation with empty land isn't much better.

"There's very few sites in Downtown where you're going to be able to go ground-up," said David Silverman, a principal at Geltmore, which developed the Imperial Building.

Exceptions include surface parking lots, Throckmorton added, but persuading the owners to relinquish their cash flow is quite the job in and of itself.
...

The complexities, paired as they are with rapidly-rising costs and a labor shortage, would seem to be enough to torpedo prospects for a housing-induced Downtown renaissance, at least in the near-to-medium term. But if there is reason to think otherwise, it comes in the form of the two projects pictured above.

Rembe's Downtowner and Throckmorton's Elevate @ Lomas and Third represent something very new in the Downtown housing game: Unlike affordable projects such as Casitas de Colores and Silver Gardens, they will rent out at market rates. And unlike other market-rate projects, such as Baker's forthcoming convent renovation and Homewise's townhomes, they are comparatively gigantic, with a combined total of nearly 350 units.

(That plays to one advantage of Downtown construction that we haven't mentioned: Build smaller and/or higher, and you can squeeze in more units per acre. That sort of economy of scale is a big help for people trying to make the numbers work.)

The hope is that the projects will act as a sort of pioneer species. If both are ultimately built and rented out at the right rates, they will make a powerful business case to other developers that Downtown is ready for more large apartment or condominium projects. Investors and lenders may have their doubts now, but there is nothing, it seems, quite as compelling as a couple of good comps. And if the new buildings inspire a few new restaurants or other amenities to open up, thus making the area that much more appealing to live in, so much the better.




Mark Baker was quoted above as well and his project got underway in December with a bit of demolition. It's now been christened as "The Villa Agave" and will have 15 apartments. Below are two recent posts he's made on Instagram with pics of the interior demolition.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CXz0fIXrigu/













https://www.instagram.com/p/CYqCEBNsYcE/













The city's RFP for Downtown housing projects closed last month on the 10th. A list of attendees for the pre-proposal meeting included many familiar names from the local development community. The list included Zydeco 66, Homewise, Palindrome and the Garcia family, along with representatives from Hartman + Majewski Design Group and a few other local business representatives. I'm hoping this RFP will attract more than one proposal, unlike the 1st and Silver RFP. At the meeting it was asked how long the selection process would take and city staff said about 3-4 months. I expect by April we should know what the proposals were and which were picked.

https://www.cabq.gov/mra/documents/p...ifications.pdf

Below is the most recent aerial pic of Downtown Albuquerque that Ben Bunner has posted, on New Year's Day.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...84642295995&id



KRQE had a story last week about the other recent city initiative for Downtown, the Storefront Activation Grants. Two businesses were selected for the grants. Electric Playhouse will use the money to establish its administrative headquarters in the historic Occidental Life Insurance Building. Blue Door Patisserie will use the money to establish a second location after its original Sawnill Market location. It will be located in the old Park Avenue Pizzeria location.

https://www.krqe.com/news/business/g...uerque-spaces/



Below are quotes from the city's press release describing the two businesses and what they plan for their Downtown spaces. Both are exciting, especially since Electric Playhouse plans some artistic flair at its location. I've seen people comment that Electric Playhouse was already Downtown, but after they opened their Westside location and with the pandemic I'm not sure they still did have a Downtown presence in their original location at 6th and Central. Before the pandemic it did host private dinners and events, but I hadn't seen anything there during the pandemic.

https://www.cabq.gov/mra/news/city-a...ivation-grants

Quote:
Electric Playhouse, which offers immersive entertainment and dining experiences at its west side location, plans to use this funding to establish an administrative headquarters downtown. The business intends to renovate 3,880 square feet of the Occidental Life Building at Third Street and Gold Avenue, including outfitting the building’s unique Gothic Revival façade with interactive art pieces and colorful architectural lighting, and updating the interior office space.

“These improvements will help us return our creative team back to the office as well as attract and expand our workforce,” said Electric Playhouse CEO and co-founder Brandon Garrett. “As an entertainment and technology startup, COVID-19 hit us hard and continues to impact us. This program will help us get back on our feet.”


Quote:
Blue Door Patisserie, which serves French cuisine in the Sawmill Market near Old Town, is using the grant to establish an additional location at 900 Park Ave. SW. The funds will assist in renovating the interior of the space, creating an attractive storefront, and providing living wages and benefits to staff.

“We’re excited we were selected for this grant and can’t wait to open our second store downtown at this amazing location,” said Blue Door Patisserie owner Jove Hubbard. “We love what’s happening in the Downtown area, and we can’t wait to see it thrive in the coming years.”


I was disappointed that only two grants were made after all this time, but glad that apparently there is no deadline and businesses can still apply for the grants. I hope that more will apply. The $500,000 is enough for about 17 grants at the maximum of $30,000 available per grant.

https://www.cabq.gov/mra/storefront-...-grant-program

The new APD Downtown substation in the Rosenwald Building received its building permit on November 18th and it is under construction, with various inspections performed since then.

https://posse.cabq.gov/posse/pub/lms...ctId=144381932





The Arrive Hotel project looks like it might be back on track and getting ready to start construction. The developer recently applied for new building permits and they are listed as drafts by the city. It's been almost exactly two years since its first application for a building permit was submitted. Of course much happened in those two years to help derail the project, which has seemingly always been shaky at best. Hopefully this will be the moment that it finally gets off the ground.

https://posse.cabq.gov/posse/pub/lms...ctId=151233136

https://posse.cabq.gov/posse/pub/lms...ctId=151694230



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  #971  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2022, 8:01 AM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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Framing construction has finally begun at the Monterey Place apartments. Below is a snap from the construction cam earlier today. This follows what seemed like forever for the foundations to be laid. There were many days in the last couple of months where no work was being done at all at the site. It may be a consequence of the labor shortage going on right now or perhaps the supply chain issues. The elevator core has been standing for a few months already.

https://pacificapconstruction.com/webcams/



The 2nd Street landscaping project at the Rail Yards is under construction. MRWM Landscape Architects recently posted the pic below of the project.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CYZQVxiOYQz/



The building permit application for the second apartment building at The Highlands was submitted earlier this month and it's currently under review by the city. Below is the permit and a pic taken on New Year's Day of the site from a poster on Instagram.

https://posse.cabq.gov/posse/pub/lms...ctId=151401728

https://www.instagram.com/p/CYMpgm5Bwe9/



UNM Hospital posted this pic of the expansion construction site earlier this week.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CYy7aGEuXiD/



A closer look at the site, showing the new parking structure.



A snap from the construction cam taken earlier today.

https://unmhealth.org/locations/tower.html



Below are the two most recent videos of the Amazon construction site in Los Lunas. The walls and roof have begun to be put into place. It looks like about 40-50 percent of the building is now up.

12-31-21

https://vimeopro.com/dronebros/const...ideo/661684842



01-15-22

https://vimeopro.com/dronebros/const...ideo/666820681

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  #972  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2022, 8:05 AM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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ABQurban posted about the Element Hotel in Uptown Albuquerque today on Instagram and said that it's under construction. The building permit for the project was issued earlier this month on January 6th.

https://posse.cabq.gov/posse/pub/lms...ctId=139898772

https://www.instagram.com/p/CY7MQEMvW_-/





The hotel's architect made a post on Twitter the same day as the permit was issued of a fly-through animation of the hotel's rooftop bar that they uploaded to their YouTube account. Below is the post and the video on YouTube.

https://mobile.twitter.com/Base4_aec...11473800990723

Video Link


On the project page at the architect's website they have new renderings that show a modified design for the hotel than the images previously presented. I can't say that I like the changes. I loved the overhanging elements of the rooftop bar and the original entrance canopy design better. The previous version was much cooler IMO, but it's still basically the same design overall, so I guess I can't complain too much. I'm just happy too see it being built!

https://www.base-4.com/portfolio/ele...lbuquerque-nm/







The project page also has a lot more renderings of the rooftop bar. It's gonna pretty sweet, and with some of the best views in the city!

















Here also is the site plan for the hotel, which will be located just east of the Uptown Tower office building in part of its parking lot.



The dual-branded hotel at Winrock Town Center looks like it also may begin construction soon. The developer applied for a building permit with the city last month and it is under review.

https://posse.cabq.gov/posse/pub/lms...ctId=150335934



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  #973  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2022, 11:40 PM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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The Albuquerque International Sunport finished 2021 with about 3.4 million passengers, a nice rebound from last year's absolutely dismal numbers. However, it's still down about 2 million from the recent high point reached in 2018. Last year started off slow but began climbing in the spring and summer before reaching a peak in October. That's not surprising since that's the month of Balloon Fiesta. November and December sustained high numbers due to the holidays and came in third and fourth in the ranking of busiest months at the Sunport to finish the year strong. We shall see what the current surge in cases and flight cancellations will do to the numbers in the next couple of months and whether the pandemic's effects linger or subside for the rest of the year.

https://www.abqsunport.com/facts-figures/

103,342 - January
104,716 - February
191,907 - March
219,558 - April
279,363 - May
345,780 - June
377,306 - July
348,502 - August
342,790 - September
395,847 - October
358,114 - November
350,730 - December

3,417,955 - 2021 total



The Sunport welcomed a new daily direct flight to Hollywood Burbank Airport on Southwest Airlines earlier this week. The mayor and city officials are hailing it as a boon for the city's burgeoning entertainment industry.

https://mobile.twitter.com/ABQSunpor...27398255644674









Earlier this month a new daily direct flight to Austin by American Airlines was also welcomed, making for three airlines to have daily direct flights between the two cities and airports.

https://mobile.twitter.com/ABQSunpor...59971378679814







Poster claystorm earlier this month on Twitter revealed renovation/remodeling plans for the Sunport which will ultimately create a new food hall. Below is his post thread where he gives the layouts and describes the project and remodeling plans in detail.

https://mobile.twitter.com/claystorm...44181643366404


Last edited by ABQalex; Jan 22, 2022 at 12:04 AM.
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  #974  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2022, 4:12 AM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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KRQE tonight has a story about Winrock Town Center and the approval on Wednesday by the Development Review Board of the park-area plans. Goodman Realty's Darin Sand says that things will really start getting going now after about 15 years of a slow transformation of the former Winrock Mall. He says the park-area construction will get underway this summer and the dual-branded hotel and Winrock Lofts this year as well. We shall see if that's true or not. For the good of our city and Uptown specifically, I hope it is true.

https://www.krqe.com/news/business/c...oject-forward/

Quote:
People have been waiting for more than a decade for the promised Winrock Town Center to be completed. After countless challenges, and delays, developers say the project is about to take off. The estimated completion date has been pushed back time after time, now the owners have gotten city approval to move forward with one of the biggest attractions.

The vision is an open-air shopping district, with a hotel, IMAX movie theater, parks, condos, and offices. Back in 2015, developers told us the project would be completed by 2018. Since then, the completion date has been pushed back again and again. “It’s a very complicated project, unlike anything that’s been done in Albuquerque,” said Darin Sand, with the Goodman Realty Group.

Some progress has been made over the years, the theater opened in 2013. A few more restaurants and stores have moved in, and New Mexico Orthopedics also calls the Winrock Town Center home. But it still doesn’t look like what was promised.

“Winrock is not one project,” Sand explained. “You can think of it as five or six different projects, each one has its challenges,” Sand said.

Now, Sand says they’re one step closer to delivering on that promise. “Construction is going to take off this year and continue for a couple of years,” he told KRQE.

Wednesday a City Planning commission approved plans for a park that will go in between the two Dillards. The park will include a lake right in the middle, an amphitheater for outdoor entertainment, and a kids’ play area. Sand says it will transform the outdoor area. “A lot of competitive cities and larger cities have amenities like this,” Sand said. “This is one thing we want to bring to Albuquerque,” he told KRQE.

Sand says he expects construction on the park to begin by this summer, he says if all goes according to plan the park should be finished by summer 2023. Construction on a 150 room hotel and a 200 unit apartment complex is also slated to start this year.


The Albuquerque Journal late last year had a story about redeveloping and adapting shopping centers to survive the changing retail landscape and current trends. They interviewed Goodman Realty's Scott Goodman and showed a couple of recent pics of Winrock Town Center.

https://www.abqjournal.com/2448440/a...er-habits.html

Quote:
Across the country, many shopping centers are already beginning to follow the town center or outdoor mall blueprint of higher restaurant ratios, more outdoor events and a move to a live-work space, he said.

Perich said the shift to an outdoor shopping center started around the ’00s and lately there has been a trend towards adding health and wellness components like gyms and medical offices.

“I would say that we’re 20 years into that evolving trend and there’s really no evidence that it’s going to change,” Perich said. “… It’s all just about becoming a little bit more of a livable, walkable environment because that’s what people want.”

Future of Winrock

Much like ABQ Uptown, which Perich pointed to as an example of a retail environment that first brought mixed-use design to Albuquerque and embraced the concept, Winrock Town Center is moving toward becoming a destination center via a live-work-play design.

When Winrock opened in the 1960s as an indoor mall, it was the primary shopping destination for the state, according to Scott Goodman, vice president of Goodman Realty, the mall’s owner. By the mid-2000s, however — when Goodman Realty purchased the center — Winrock was “dying,” Goodman said.

Since purchasing the center, Goodman Realty has converted existing big-box stores on the property to new businesses, like turning the former Toys “R” Us into a Chuze Fitness gym while also adding a variety of retailers with outside access like Ulta Beauty, TJ Maxx and Nordstrom Rack.

Goodman Realty is currently in the process of converting the main mall structure from an indoor mall into a mixed-use outdoor shopping center with a park in the center.

Plans for the center go beyond just retail stores and restaurants.

In the next few years Goodman Realty will add condos, lofts, a hotel and office buildings to the property.

The center is also largely moving away from large footprint anchor stores in favor of larger medical offices like New Mexico Orthopedics and smaller sized retail spaces, according to Goodman.

Goodman said investment into Winrock through redevelopment has been able to create a demand for the center, something he expects will continue as the mall continues to add more mixed-use components.






The story also mentioned the other malls and large shopping centers in the city. They contrasted the success of Coronado Center in Uptown with the struggle of Cottonwood Mall on the Westside in keeping up and adapting to these changes.

Quote:
Once a dominant feature of American life, shopping malls have been on a steady decline for the past several decades as shoppers moved away from big box stores in favor of e-commerce.

In the United States, many malls have closed in recent years with upwards of hundreds predicted to shutter in the coming years, according to real estate research companies. Yet Albuquerque has somewhat bucked this trend with several of the city’s malls adding new tenants and continuing new construction — even during the pandemic.

Local real estate experts and mall managers credit adaptability and the ability to focus on consumer needs.

Ben Perich, vice president of the Colliers’ New Mexico retail team, said some of Albuquerque’s malls have adapted to the changing retail scene by diversifying their offerings and moving away from the traditional indoor mall environment.

While there is the move away from indoor malls, Perich said he doesn’t believe the format will disappear entirely, there will just be a need for fewer of them.

“We’re approaching the end of the large indoor enclosed mall,” Perich said. “… I think a large part of that is related to evolving shopping trends, a lot of it’s been driven by the internet.”

Perich said the trend is already playing out in Albuquerque — the Coronado Center in Uptown is nearly full while he said its indoor counterpart, Cottonwood Mall on the West Side, is struggling to attract and retain tenants.

Cottonwood Mall’s management did not respond to requests for an interview.

In the last five years the mall lost two anchor tenants when both Sports Authority and Sears filed for bankruptcy in 2016 and 2018, respectively and closed their Cottonwood locations. The loss of the anchor tenants has resulted in more than 100,000 square feet in space available to lease or purchase, according to listings on the Commercial Association of Realtors New Mexico.

Washington Prime Group, the owner of Cottonwood Mall, also filed for bankruptcy this year.

“It’s probably not fair to call Cottonwood a corpse yet,” Perich said. “… If JCPenney closes, if Dillard’s closes, then it’s definitely a dead mall.”

Perich said the different outcomes are in part due to Coronado embracing nontraditional mall tenants like entertainment options and Cottonwood having to contend with a nearby shopping center full of big-name stores like Costco and Cost Plus World Market.

“(Cottonwood) itself needs to be re-envisioned with a variety of additional uses,” he said.


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  #975  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2022, 12:23 AM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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Downtown Albuquerque News reported this morning that the Arrive Hotel project is finally underway. Demolition work has begun on the interior of the structure. They interviewed the spokeswoman for Arrive who confirmed that the project is underway and gave an expected completion date of next year. It's previously been reported that it's a $22 million project.

https://downtownalbuquerquenews.com/

Quote:
Construction crews have begun work at the Hotel Blue after some two years of regulatory, engineering, financing, and pandemic-related delays, kicking off a top-to-bottom renovation of the 135-room hotel, which closed in 2017.

Raluca State, a spokeswoman for Los Angeles-based developer Arrive by Palisociety, confirmed that work is underway and told DAN the renovated facility is scheduled to reopen next year. She said she could not offer more details, though in previous updates the company has said it expects construction to take about one year.

At the hotel's Eighth and Central location, workers have in recent days been spotted using heavy equipment to remove pieces of what appear to be interior walls, and have filled up several large dumpsters in the process.

Arrive bought the hotel in 2018 and unveiled its renovation proposal in August 2019. Its plans included a full exterior renovation of the 1965 structure and the addition of a bar, coffee shop, full restaurant, event rooms, and outdoor food truck area. The restaurant plan was later dropped due to higher-than-expected construction costs.

Two years of delays followed, and they were alternatively chalked up to the pandemic or financing difficulties. A firm called Palisociety later bought Arrive and as of last summer would not comment on when the project might begin (DAN, 7/15/21). The recent onset of construction was not announced publicly.

A tax subsidy of about $1.1 million over 20 years - orchestrated by the city's Economic Development Department - was a key part of Arrive's financing strategy. The City Council approved the subsidy in 2019.


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  #976  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2022, 12:33 AM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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The city today officially unveiled the $85 million Sunport renovation that will ultimately create a new food hall/concessions area. It's the largest renovation at the Sunport since the massive expansion back in the late 1980s. It's also the latest in a string of renovations in recent years that add up to over $200 million and have been quite transformative in their own right. They expect the project to get underway next January and be completed in phases over three years.

https://www.krqe.com/news/albuquerqu...ajor-upgrades/

Quote:
The Albuquerque International Sunport is going to undergo its largest renovation in 30 years. The $85 million plan will move the security checkpoint and add a food court. Once complete, the new TSA checkpoint will be at the top of the escalators where the old Tia Juanita’s Restaurant is located, and in the old TSA spot, a new food court with some room for local favorites.

“We hope down the road, this will be way down the road. But that might even include iconic local shops and businesses, whether it’s Dion’s or Laguna Burger or whatever. It’s certainly part of the plan,” said Mayor Tim Keller.

Construction is expected to take three years to complete with construction phases beginning in January 2023. That includes plans to minimize the impact of increased travelers during the Balloon Fiesta and holidays. The project is funded with revenue generated by the CABQ Department of Aviation and federal funds. The city says shops and restaurants will be available at all times during construction. According to a news release from the city, the plan will also convert lighting throughout the terminal to LED, furthering the Sunport’s sustainability efforts.






Joshy0414 over at SSC this past weekend shared these additional renderings and a video animation of the renovation project.





Video Link
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  #977  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2022, 4:17 AM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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Michael Dreskin's next apartment project at 2818 4th Street NW received its building permits on Friday. It will have 84 units and about 2,400 Sq ft of ground-floor commercial space along 4th Street. It had faced a fair bit of neighborhood opposition and several deferrals by the DRB to address neighborhood issues with the design since it was first submitted for review in early 2020.

https://posse.cabq.gov/posse/pub/lms...ctId=116833727

https://posse.cabq.gov/posse/pub/lms...ctId=144760301









A second set of renderings with several changes to the design were produced in October 2020, but I'm not certain these are the final design. They mostly reduced the size of the building, especially the upper floors, which was a main issue for the neighborhood. They deemed the original design too monolithic.









The thing is, the final site plan that was produced in early March 2021 doesn't match the second set of renderings, it instead matches the first set of renderings. If you look in the rendering directly above, it has one set of doors on the north side of the building facing Phoenix Avenue. The site plan below shows two sets of doors, like in the original renderings. This site plan was approved by the DRB on March 31st of 2021, when the project got all of its final approvals.

http://data.cabq.gov/government/plan...ch_31_2021.pdf





I like elements of both versions, but the second set looks like it made the project smaller, probably with less units, which I never like. However, the building permit lists 84 units, which was the original number. Yet another clue that perhaps the design ultimately wasn't changed.

I guess we'll just have to wait and see what ended up being the final design and what gets built. Michael Dreskin has a track record of getting his projects built quickly, so it may already be underway now.

Michael Dreskin's projects often have wacky color combinations, which I've not always liked, but it's hard for me to be displeased with his projects since they are mixed-use, dense, and add affordable market-rate housing to the city.

His previous project, Cascade Crossing, was sold and its new owners painted over its yellow and blue sections. I can't say that I absolutely loved the old color combination but I think it deserved to be left in place until it needed to be repainted. The new color combination is like any other brown and white building in the city, it even gives off Territorial-style vibes now. I think I would've made the balcony floor edges and roof overhanngs black to make it a little more distinctive.

https://www.showmetherent.com/3308-4...erque-NM-87107









Edit: It barely occurred to me to check the inspections tab on the building permit to see if the project is underway. It is indeed underway, with a footing inspection having taken place today!

Last edited by ABQalex; Jan 25, 2022 at 4:56 AM.
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  #978  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2022, 2:09 AM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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An ironworker at the Presbyterian Hospital expansion project posted these neat pics earlier today on Facebook for the topping off of the penthouse structure.

https://m.facebook.com/ABQcornerston...9048922794196/















In that last pic you can see the small mural that was painted a few months ago on the I-25 entrance ramp retaining wall along the frontage road. Below are a couple more pics of it from the artist, Wemfer, on Instagram.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CVSnHx1LrUJ/



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  #979  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2022, 2:31 AM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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Below are a few nice aerial pics and vids of the Hotel Albuquerque, Hotel Chaco and Sawmill Market. They were posted on Instagram this weekend by the same poster who revealed the Amazon project in Los Lunas, Low Altitude Aerial.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CZUWGRJl0tv/



https://www.instagram.com/p/CZXJTIuL8O-/







https://www.instagram.com/p/CZSfKNFPWm8/





https://www.instagram.com/p/CZPYgwWhiQd/

Here's the full video from the Instagram preview above on his YouTube account.

Video Link
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  #980  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2022, 3:58 AM
ABQalex ABQalex is offline
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Albuquerque has once again been named the best big city to live and work as a filmmaker by MovieMaker magazine. It's the fourth year in a row the city has topped the list, the first time that has happened in the over twenty years that the ranking has been done by the magazine. Santa Fe came in at number 3 in the small cities category.

https://www.moviemaker.com/best-plac...ker-in-2022/4/

Quote:
1. Albuquerque

This marks the fourth year in a row that this New Mexico metropolis has claimed the title as the best place to live and work as a moviemaker in North America.

And for good reason: production spend during the fiscal year of 2021 surpassed spending in the 2019 fiscal year by over $100 million. “Estimated spend for fiscal year 2021 was $500 million,” Cyndy McCrossen, the city’s film liaison, tells MovieMaker. “Fiscal year 2022 is at pace to continue that upward trend.” The production boom is breathing new life into the entire city, including a budding film tourism business to satisfy visitors’ curiosity as to where huge television hits like Stranger Things and Breaking Bad were filmed. It’s also helping ancillary businesses like Crafty Apes — a full-service special effects company that opened a 2,000-square-foot facility recently — and Keslow Camera, a camera rental house based in Los Angeles that opened an office in Albuquerque. Netflix is a huge driver behind this growth. The streaming giant bought ABQ Studios in 2018, pledging to spend $1 billion in the state, and furthered that commitment with another billion-dollar-pledge in 2020. This year, Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham celebrated the opening of NBCUniversal’s New Mexico Production Studio in Albuquerque after the ribbon-cutting ceremony was cancelled in 2020 due to the pandemic. “We are not just making movies here. We are a movie industry hub for the United States and the world,” Grisham told local paper The Santa Fe New Mexican. The governor’s support of the film industry echoes a sentiment McCrossen expressed to MovieMaker: “Albuquerque is a movie town. The city government and the citizens themselves take great pride in the industry and culture of film.”
https://mobile.twitter.com/ABQFilmOf...66344369872896



A quote from MovieMaker's editor-in-chief was included in the Santa Fe New Mexican's coverage:

Quote:
“Four times at No. 1 is astonishing, and it’s a testament to how much Albuquerque has exploded as a production hub,” MovieMaker editor-in-chief Tim Molloy said in a news release.

NBCUniversal in June opened its 80,000-square-foot Albuquerque production studio with three sound stages.

NBCUniversal joins Netflix, which in 2018 acquired Albuquerque Studios and its eight sound stages. Netflix plans to build 10 more sound stages in Albuquerque. New Mexico has 23 sound stages in Albuquerque and Santa Fe.
https://www.santafenewmexican.com/ne...16895b77d.html

Adding to the studio space, the Albuquerque Journal in late November revealed and opened a new studio complex in its former production plant at Journal Center. This comes after the Journal moved production of its print edition to a joint venture with the Santa Fe New Mexican at its printing facility in Santa Fe.

https://www.abqjournal.com/2447512/m...nal-plant.html

Quote:
As New Mexico’s film industry continues to boom, studio space is scarce.

Enter The Studios At Journal Center.

William Lang, president of Albuquerque Publishing Co., announced on Friday the formation of a movie production facility.

The new venture will be headquartered at and utilize portions of the publishing company’s facility at 7777 Jefferson NE, the same campus that houses the Journal.

The Studios At Journal Center is comprised of a main stage area of 23,000 square feet with adjoining office space, a secondary stage or mill area of 13,000 square feet, and approximately 10,000 square feet of office space that can be used for production offices or filming. Additional office and general utility rooms are also available.

The site has parking for more than 350 vehicles and can accommodate production base camps.

New Mexico-based productions have used Albuquerque Publishing Co. as a location for more than a decade.

“We have served as a location in a number of productions and look forward to providing first-class facilities and experiences to future productions” Lang said in a news release.


The final season of Better Call Saul is currently filming in the city. Production has recently been spotted downtown and at the BioPark. Downtown Albuquerque and the BioPark are apparently standing in for Omaha, replete with fake snow, since we've had a very mild winter with little snow here so far. Production is expected to wrap up in early February, with final filming taking place in Santa Fe.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CZAgzniP3Rk/





https://www.instagram.com/p/CZQgbURLcCg/



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