HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Transportation


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1481  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2020, 7:20 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 50,278
Increase in Paris cycle lanes leads to dramatic rise in bike commuting

https://www.transportenvironment.org...bike-commuting

Quote:
.....

- The bicycle has long had a place in French culture, mostly for sport or leisure use, but following an initiative by Paris’s mayor Anne Hidalgo to increase the city’s cycle lanes – under the name Plan Vélo – cycling is now growing as a commuter activity. Hidalgo initially promised a doubling of the existing 700km of lanes to 1,400km by March 2020; she has since revised that down to a total of 1,000km, and just under 40% had been built by the end of 2019. --- Following the installation in September of electric meters to monitor the amount of cycle usage, the city can now give more accurate figures for levels of cycling in Paris. The figure of a 54% increase covers the period between September 2018 and September 2019. In the central district of Île de France, meters recorded 840,000 bike journeys per day. That is still well below the total for car trips of 14.8 million, but car trips are down 5% since 2010.

- Research shows the most common reason for cycling is commuting by bike. In fact there is a word for it in everyday Parisian vocabulary: ‘vélotaf’. That also explains why money has been invested in the so-called RER-V cycle network, which aims to expand cycle paths outside the ‘Périphique’ Paris ring road so cycling to work is a viable option for people in the suburbs. The mayor’s office says the RER-V network is intended to enable cyclists ‘to ride without doubt, without danger and over long distances’. --- However, parking for bicycles remains limited in Paris, and while the French government is also making money available for municipalities to improve infrastructure that makes cycling safer, gaps within the Greater Paris area still need to be addressed. T&E’s French member, Réseau Action Climat (RAC), says the cycling budget that is allocated by the government to municipalities is falling short on what’s needed.

.....



__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1482  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2020, 3:28 AM
jtown,man jtown,man is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Chicago
Posts: 3,958
Sweet. I bet the transit strikes will encourage others to at least think of biking as a backup commuting option.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1483  
Old Posted May 15, 2020, 6:59 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 50,278
Court Swats Away NIMBY Anti-Bike-Path Claim on East Side

https://nyc.streetsblog.org/2020/05/...-on-east-side/

Quote:
.....

- The state Supreme Court’s Appellate Division has rejected a lawsuit that sought to stop the erection of a pedestrian and bicycle bridge over a Midtown Manhattan park — a victory for city agencies over the “Not in My Back Yard” crowd. In upholding a lower court’s ruling, the Appellate Division made the important point that such infrastructure is an entirely appropriate use of parkland — which should cheer those who want more public pedestrian and bicycle amenities. “This pedestrian bridge is intended to provide the public with safe and scenic access to the waterfront along the East River,” said City Law Department spokesman Nicholas Paolucci. “We are pleased the court agreed the city’s approval of this project was lawful and appropriate.”

- The Cannon Point Preservation Corporation, a community group, sued the city last year claiming the bridge would illegally seize parkland in a vest-pocket greensward, Clara Coffey Park. The suit contended that the structure required approval from the Legislature and review under New York State Environmental Quality Review Act. A lower court had thrown out the suit on procedural issues. The bridge — which would span the FDR Drive to connect Sutton Place South at East 54th Street to an as yet unbuilt part of the East River Esplanade — is part of the larger East River Greenway, a mammoth, multi-year project to create waterfront access around Manhattan for residential recreation.

.....



__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1484  
Old Posted Jun 2, 2020, 2:53 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 50,278
Toronto council has greenlit a historic bike network expansion. Here’s what comes next

https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/202...e-network.html

Quote:
.....

- Councillors voted 23 to 2 in favour of the $6.5-million plan to create 25 kilometres of new cycling infrastructure at a special virtual council meeting Thursday as city hall continues to operate under COVID-19 restrictions. Including projects council approved before the crisis hit, the vote means the city will install about 40 kilometres of bike lanes in 2020, which represents the largest single-year build-out of on-street cycling infrastructure in Toronto’s history. The quick expansion falls under the city’s ActiveTO program, which is intended to give pedestrians and cyclists more space on the roads during the pandemic.

- The bike lanes along Bloor, Danforth and University will also parallel formerly crowded TTC subway lines that are operating at reduced capacity during the crisis. The cycling routes are intended to provide residents who previously relied on transit with new travel options. Speaking before the vote, Mayor John Tory said the expansion was a “sensible” way “to advance the cause of good health and good safety” during the pandemic. He said that while the threat of the contagion persists there will be “an awful lot of people out there who will be looking for an alternative to transit,” and who don’t have access to a car, and it was council’s job to provide for “different forms of transportation to get people around our city in the 21st century.”

.....



__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1485  
Old Posted Jul 20, 2020, 6:31 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 50,278
Bike New York Offers Bold List of NYPD/DOT Reforms

https://nyc.streetsblog.org/2020/07/...d-dot-reforms/

Quote:
.....

The Bike New York list includes the following demands:

• Manage traffic law enforcement to avoid disproportionate racial application: The group wants the mayor’s Vision Zero Task Force to not only update the public, but also explain “the specific problems traffic law enforcement is seeking to address and how enforcement resources are being employed.” That level of transparency simply does not exist now.

• More cameras: The city must lobby for state permission to install more speed cameras to “minimize enforcement car stops” by the NYPD.

• Public involvement: Allow members of the public to submitted video evidence of reckless driving, as London has done. This would also reduce the NYPD involvement.

• Expand alternative sanction programs: This one is tricky, because the mayor already cut funding for just such a program that he says he supports, the Dangerous Vehicle Abatement Program.

• NYPD out of DOT: The city must end police involvement in decisions about traffic patterns and event-related bike detours (like the West Side greenway and Fleet Week). Specifically, the NYPD’s transportation bureau should strike the words “expedite vehicular traffic within the city” from its mission statement.

• Stop the silliness: The Department must end ridiculous enforcement, including:

- quota-oriented and randomly applied summonses for bike riders for non-dangerous offenses like proceeding through T intersections with no traffic conflict

- riding with no bell summonses.

- riding-on-sidewalk summonsing, which are disproportionately enforced against Blacks.

• Stop blaming victims: Reform the NYPD’s public information office so that it does not reflexively blame victims and reflexively defend drivers.

• Come clean: The groups wants the mayor to admit that NYPD vehicles “routinely stop and park in the city’s bike lanes and set a negative example for motorists citywide.” The best practice would be to “make precinct commanders accountable for ending the practice in their areas.”

• A car-free force? To reduce climate and social impact of police driving, the department must put more officers on foot and bicycles.

• Expand collision investigation: The NYPD’s Collision Investigation Squad is understaffed. As a result, many serious crashes are never investigated, meaning that thousands of reckless drivers go free — and city safety planners never get data to learn from those drivers’ (or street designers’) mistakes.

.....
__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1486  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2020, 2:51 PM
shivtim's Avatar
shivtim shivtim is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Midtown Atlanta
Posts: 1,742
Atlanta Beltline continues to grow with construction starting on the Southside Trail, connecting directly to the existing Westside Trail.

Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1487  
Old Posted Aug 1, 2020, 7:43 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 50,278
The Subconscious Power of Bicycle Parking

https://medium.com/@liamdmoroney/the...ng-c1a94d0365e

Quote:
.....

- In 2004, Portland, Oregon, launched an ambitious project to increase the availability of bicycle parking in the city. One of the initiatives was the building of bike ‘corrals’ exclusive bike parking facilities that would house 10–20 bikes each. Located on the street, these facilities could increase the bike parking on a block by up to 800%. However, every corral built would involve reallocating 1–2 car spaces, and so there were big questions about the potential impact on local businesses. --- There is a common belief that in dense commercial areas, most customers are motorists. By reducing available on-street parking in Portland, it was feared that motorists would choose to take their business to locations where there was free or more readily available parking. Little data was available to the City of Portland to dispute this, and so they decided to run a study as they rolled out the program. Data was collected through surveys from 248 businesses located within a half-block of locations where the initial 40 bike corrals were installed.

Despite all of the initial concerns, the results turned out to be almost entirely positive. Of those businesses close to the corrals:

• 67% saw an increase in foot and bike traffic

• Cyclists represented 24.8% of the total client base

• 53% reported that it increased the visibility of their business

- What’s more, every single business saw an increase in customers who were cyclists as a result of the installation. Sometimes, as it turned out, if you build it they do come. For Portland, it actually began to give businesses an advantage to have a corral nearby. The demand for bike corrals began to rise rapidly, outpacing the city’s ability to install them. By 2013, they had built 100 corrals 1,644 bike parking spaces. Today there are 158. --- Most of Portland’s bicycle parking is still provided by bike racks on the sidewalk. But as the city continues to grow its cycling population, the demand for effective bike parking increases with it. Once a controversial proposal, bike corrals are now requested by businesses as a desirable solution. --- When it comes to cycling, psychology plays a crucial role. When placing large investments into building a bike-friendly city, Portland learned from surveys that there was a major hurdle around the perception of safety.

- Survey after survey told them the same thing, the number one reason people do not ride bicycles is because of fear of being in the roadway on a bicycle. This information led to important decisions like protected bike lanes, which help to alleviate those fears by separating cyclists from the traffic itself. Bike lane design plays a big role in bringing cyclists confidently onto the road, but what role does parking play? Why did the corrals work so well in Portland compared to other forms of bike parking? --- When it comes to bike parking, visible parking facilities provide strong priming stimuli about that location. If you see a store with a dedicated bike corral instead of parking on the sidewalk, it tells your brain that this location is likely to see a higher frequency of cyclist parking, and therefore is probably a destination for cyclists. --- This is likely one reason why every business in the Portland study saw increased traffic from cyclists when a corral was installed.

.....



__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1488  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2020, 7:53 PM
mrnyc mrnyc is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 7,546
a long sought connector from the old slavic village neighborhood through the industrial valley to downtown cleveland finally gains momentum:

https://youtu.be/DEncZJBwfJ8
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1489  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2020, 5:42 PM
DanielG425 DanielG425 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by 202_Cyclist View Post

Also, if you get a serious brain injury, I hope you are willing to pay for the medical expenses by yourself and that you don't expect insurance to cover the cost of treatment.
Wtf? "You better not expect your private insurance to be used exactly as its supposed to be used." Stupid comment.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1490  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2020, 6:27 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 50,278
Bogotá Is Building its Future Around Bikes

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...s?srnd=citylab

Quote:
.....

- In March, Bogotá captured global attention by creating an 84-kilometer emergency bike network to help essential workers get around during the early days of the Covid-19 crisis. Like similar efforts in Paris, Milan and many European cities, the Colombian capital’s swift move to make room for bikes and pedestrians was greeted with acclaim by advocates for car-free mobility. --- But Mayor Claudia López, an avid cyclist herself, might just be getting started. She’s counting on a vast expansion of bicycle routes as the best way for Bogotanos to move into the future. In February, López announced that the city’s development plan for the next four years would add a total of 280 additional kilometers of bike lanes to the existing 550-kilometer network. Currently, almost 7% of overall trips in Bogotá are on bicycles, more than in any other city in Latin America. But the city is aiming much higher: The long-term goal is to have 50% of total trips made on bikes or other micromobility alternatives such as scooters.

- To nudge more Bogotanos onto bikes, the city also dropped speed limits to 50 kilometers per hour citywide and declared that at least 20% of public and private parking must be put aside for bikes while the pandemic lasts. To rein in bike thefts, which jumped 24% in the first six months of 2020 compared to the same period a year earlier, the city established a bike registration database, carrying out awareness campaigns and opening stands across the city to reach more people. “Registro Bici Bogotá” includes the user’s contact information, as well as the bike’s specific characteristics and serial number, making it harder to sell and easier to recover if stolen. --- So far, the bike-promotion efforts seem to be effective. On a typical day before the pandemic, more than 880,000 bicycle trips were taken in a day. Even though many commuters are working remotely and students are homebound as schools and universities are closed, the city estimates that bike trips are down only about half during coronavirus lockdowns.

.....



__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1491  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2020, 6:46 PM
mrnyc mrnyc is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 7,546
^ its really nice to see the moving away from auto traffic like that.

hopefully it catches on and they bulk up to permanent bike lanes.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1492  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2020, 3:00 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 50,278
Should We Put Bikes in the “Slow Lane”?

https://nextcity.org/daily/entry/sho...-the-slow-lane

Quote:
.....

- In addition to encouraging more people to ride, bicycle advocates of all stripes seek to get motorists to accept bikes and their riders as legitimate users of road space. But they split into two camps over the best way to do this. The dominant camp since the 1980s promotes what’s been dubbed the “Amsterdam” or “Scandinavian” model, which promotes protected bike lanes separate from motor vehicle and pedestrian traffic as the best way to make cycling safer for more people. A dedicated minority, most prominently the late cyclist-engineer John Forester, advocate instead for “vehicular cycling,” having bikes operate in the general traffic stream, with bicyclists behaving like drivers of non-motorized cars.

- Lacking the money to build a bike-lane network, Madrid instead marked regular travel lanes in city streets as restricted to vehicles operating at 30 km/h (18.6 mph), and it says that these “slow lanes” actually lead to even fewer crashes while boosting bike use. Somewhere up there, Forester is no doubt smiling while taking the lane in order to make a left turn. — When the city of Madrid faced potential fines from the European Union for failing to reduce transportation emissions in 2013, money was something it lacked. So the city simply stocked up on white paint and opted for a different approach. Now the city is touting its approach as just as effective as protected bike lanes, leading even Streetsblog USA to ask “Is It Time for the U.S. to Try the ‘Madrid Model’ of Vehicular Cycling Infrastructure?”

- Madrid’s “slow lanes” follow the traditional rules of the road in that they are located as far to the right as possible on a multi-lane thoroughfare. Their use is restricted to low-speed vehicles, which are required to take the lane by law, and cars can use them only if they observe the low speed limit. Those that do not face stiff fines. And at the same time that the city started marking slow lanes, it launched an e-bike-share program to encourage more Madrileños to bike their way around the hilly city. — By 2018, the article states, Madrid had the third-lowest rate of bicycle crashes per million trips in Europe, behind only Amsterdam and Copenhagen, both poster children for the opposite approach. And its fatality rate tied with Oslo, another protected-bike-lane city, for the lowest. This, the article suggests, should be good news for American bicycle advocates who want to see more two-wheeled, human-powered vehicles on the road.

.....



__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1493  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2020, 8:34 PM
llamaorama llamaorama is offline
Unicorn Wizard!
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 3,755
It's an interesting idea but would only work if American cities had both the policing resources and political will to actually enforce those speed limits. I don't see it happening, personally. A city could put up those speed limits, but most drivers would ignore it and those who got tickets would contest them. State laws usually prohibit cities from installing speed cameras.

Also it is difficult to maintain a speed of below 20 mph in a car without constantly staring at the dashboard and ignoring your surroundings. You end up tapping the gas over and over and coasting. The cruise control won't work that low. Most people aren't going to comply because its very difficult to.

Finally this would only work on traditionally urban streets that are already slow moving. I see problems with doing this in an American suburb. Having cars in the lane to the left going 45 mph and someone in the right lane going 20 mph sounds like a bad collision waiting to happen.

IMO in the US our approach should be to just wholesale mark residential side streets in large cities as slow streets that might have single-lane chicanes or round islands in intersections, speed humps, etc. Then try to get most traffic to bypass these areas on larger arterial roads. My thinking is that we'd then enforce speed limits in the slow street zones with more discretion, like maybe a motorist who sees a cyclist should slow down and keep a certain distance, etc.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1494  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2020, 8:47 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 50,278
Or have speed bumps in the slow lanes with gaps in between for cyclists to ride through them.
__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1495  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2020, 4:32 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 50,278
The Pandemic Bike Boom Hits in Some Unexpected American Cities

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...?sref=fzXhlHko

Quote:
....

- Among the six U.S. cities for which Strava provided data, Houston and Los Angeles, two sprawling metropolises where just .5% and 1% of the respective populations biked to work in pre-pandemic times, stand out. In Houston, the total volume of cycling trips in Houston was 138% higher in May 2020 than in May 2019. In Los Angeles, the jump was 93%. Unlike their peers, these two places also saw cycling increases in April, the first full month of widespread stay-at-home order and economic shutdowns. --- Yet other major cities saw more people pedaling this spring and summer. After a drop in trips in April, New York City saw a steady rise in cycling in the ensuing months, with nearly 80% year-over-year growth in trips for July. Chicago saw significant, though more modest, increases, with a 34% bump that same month.

.....



__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1496  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2020, 9:25 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 50,278
Imagine a transcontinental network of protected bike paths

https://www.fastcompany.com/90558919...ted-bike-paths

Quote:
.....

- Under an elevated rail line in Miami, a new park will open this fall with a 10-mile path dedicated to walking and biking. It’s an infrastructure improvement for Miami cyclists, but it’s also part of a larger, interstate network of trails that will eventually make it possible to ride from Florida to Maine with little interaction with cars. And even that enormous project is itself just a small part of an even bigger dream: a network of protected bike lanes connecting cities across the country, making it possible to bike from city to city and ocean to ocean safely. — Called the Underline, the park in Miami will link into the East Coast Greenway project and is an example of the kind of trail that could form car-free connections across the entire country. “The projects are out there,” says Dennis Markatos-Soriano, East Coast Greenway Alliance executive director. “They just need the funding to complete design and construction.”

- The group is now advocating for a greenway stimulus as a way to create a full national network of connected bike and pedestrian paths while simultaneously helping the economy recover from the pandemic. Ten billion dollars invested in greenways, Markatos-Soriano says, could support 170,000 jobs across the country. It could also generate another $100 billion in health and environmental benefits. — “Economists agree that we need fiscal stimulus, and the consensus is building that a big focus should be supporting jobs through infrastructure investments,” he says. “But building more highways will just make fires, hurricanes, and flooding worse by further destabilizing the climate. Greenway construction supports 50% more jobs than highway construction, and it’s building the transportation systems that people want and need right now.” — Other ambitious greenway projects are underway, including the Great American Rail-Trail, a cross-country path that aims to connect Washington, D.C., with the State of Washington.

.....


















__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1497  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2020, 5:29 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 50,278
How Seville Became a City of Cyclists

https://usa.streetsblog.org/2020/10/...y-of-cyclists/

Quote:
.....

- In just two years, we transformed a city with almost no cyclists and seven miles of bike lanes, to a city where bikes have a central role in the urban mobility system. While Seville, Spain, with around one in 10 trips made by bike, is still far from the cycling mobility figures of Amsterdam or Copenhagen (though more residents of Seville walk than in either of those cities), by rapidly building out a complete bike network, we managed to make cycling significant for everyday transportation and in the culture of the city. — The secret to our success was treating cycling like a system of transportation, building an entire network of connected lanes, instead of a few disconnected lanes year after year. And getting it all done at once before the political winds changed. By making cycling omnipresent in the urban landscape, we taught residents to see cycling as a means of transportation. Or to say it another way: If you build it, they will come.

- The call for cycling infrastructure had the political support and the political will required for a wholesale commitment to cycling. The first step to making that political will into reality was to design a comprehensive cycling network. Network is the important word here to improve cycling as a mobility choice, we needed to treat cycling infrastructure as a system of connections, like roads or train tracks. — We broke the design of the network into phases, and the first phase connected major “trip attractors” in the city, such as work and educational centers, public transit hubs, and recreational spaces, such as squares, commercial streets, and green areas. — This was done during the elaboration of the City Masterplan and included a parallel citizen participation process. The result of this first phase was a nearly 50 mile-long network, but we did not plan these lanes at random. Rather, the network was defined by continuity, cohesion, visibility, and comfort.

- First and foremost, the network was designed to connect “trip attractors” and residential areas of the city through a continuum of bike lanes. The design of the bike lanes was very similar throughout the network (green, bidirectional, seven to eight feet wide), so that cyclists, and people in general, could easily follow and recognize them. The network also followed the main streets and avenues of the city, and therefore was quite visible. — As a general rule, detours and multiple street crossings were avoided. All in all, the whole network was designed to provide comfortable bicycle riding for people with no previous cycling experience, and space for the network came from car traffic roads and parking lanes. In this way, every aspect of the network’s design served our goal of moving people from cars to bikes. Despite the detail of this design, we built quickly, and this was critical to our success. This first phase was constructed in less than two years during 2006 and 2007.

- This transformative mobility shift did not occur in isolation. While a network of bike lanes made it possible, these numbers were aided by a concurrent installation of a public bike share system along the bike network. Also, the building of functional cycling infrastructure was accompanied by a more comprehensive move toward sustainable mobility in the city, including the pedestrianization of important areas and restrictions on car traffic. This transformative mobility shift can also not be separated from the political will. — Political will is the key factor in developing sustainable mobility policies, but this political will must manifest in decisions regarding where to build infrastructure and how to manage the mobility system. It takes more than a pro-bike government; it takes making decisions based on how to achieve a real and significant change in mode share. From a technical point of view, the knowledge needed to make things happen already exists, and there is no need to wait.

.....



__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1498  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2020, 9:06 PM
mrnyc mrnyc is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 7,546
^ from barbers to bikers.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1499  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2020, 9:19 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 50,278
__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1500  
Old Posted Dec 15, 2020, 6:22 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 50,278
Cycling Injury Risk in London: Impacts of Road Characteristics and Infrastructure

https://findingspress.org/article/18...infrastructure

Quote:
.....

- This study of cycling injury risk in London examines impacts of road characteristics and environment, including different types of cycling infrastructure. It controlled for exposure by using a case-crossover method alongside an algorithm developed by Transport for London to predict cyclist routes. When compared to no infrastructure, this study found that protected cycle infrastructure reduced odds of injury by 40-65% in the morning commute, whereas advisory lanes increased injury odds by 34%. Junctions were found to increase injury odds threefold; higher pedestrian density also increased injury odds. This study supports growing evidence of a ‘safety in numbers’ effect.

.....



__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Transportation
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 9:36 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.