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  #661  
Old Posted Nov 8, 2019, 1:42 PM
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___________________________________________________________________________________Downtown ADJ. - Salt Lake City International Airport Update Contd...


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Originally Posted by SLCPolitico View Post

Construction progress update photo

https://www.slcairport.com/thenewslc...ress-gallery/][img]https://i.imgur.com/lQKX2y7.jpg

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  #662  
Old Posted Nov 8, 2019, 2:21 PM
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New Salt Lake airport will have art everywhere — even in the restrooms


By Lee Davidson, The Salt Lake Tribune - https://www.sltrib.com/news/politics...-lake-airport/


TV cameras focused, still photographers started snapping photos and reporters pulled out notebooks as Salt Lake City International Airport Director Bill Wyatt walked to a podium Friday.

“This, I suppose by any measure, is quite an unusual event: unveiling art for the bathrooms” for the new $3.6 billion airport scheduled to open Sept. 15, he said.

Indeed, the airport actually held a news conference to show off mural art for its new restrooms. Officials say this shows a dedication to details and comfort that should make the new airport experience stand out for millions of travelers.

The airport showed the first 20 new paintings by local and national artists that will become what it calls “whimsy wall” murals stretching the length of new restrooms.



Mayor Jackie Biskupski said plans for art throughout the new airport were incorporated from initial designs, rather than being added after construction is nearly complete.

“This is done in part to ensure that this airport — wherever you are — is visually appealing and tells the unique story of who we are as Utahns,” she said. “One of those unexpected places is the restrooms, which will serve millions of travelers each year.”

Chosen paintings will include everything from a sunset on the Great Salt Lake to abstract art about the feeling of accelerating and decelerating, clouds, birds, wildflowers, books, rainbows, American Indian art, deserts and service dogs.

Utah artist Trent Call attended Friday to inspect how a small abstract painting he made — inspired by ancient Lake Bonneville — had been digitally supersized, placed on vinyl and stretched along a restroom wall.

What was it like being at a news conference to show his art in a restroom? “It’s definitely a first,” he said.

The Salt Lake Tribune) Daniel Ray Everett's piece Whimsical Birds of Paradise, at a news conference showcase

https://www.sltrib.com/resizer/wIpZh...XKUKWWTKL4.jpg

Unfortunately for him, his art is in a women’s restroom — so he can’t visit it once the airport opens. “It’s OK, I got some good photos,” he said. Call added that he truly enjoys seeing it supersized because that helps the feeling he tried to depict of being covered by Lake Bonneville, which once submerged the airport area.

“The art really pops,” Wyatt said. “It just adds a dimension of power to the bathroom that otherwise is just kind of industrial space.”

Wyatt said officials spent a lot of time refining plans for restrooms because, well, visitors will spend a lot of time there and often form opinions of airport by their restrooms.

“We absolutely have to get that right,” he said. “Typically for a hub airport, the first and last thing you probably do is use one of the restrooms.”

In the current airport — which serves 25 million passengers a year but was designed for only 10 million — Wyatt says far too few restrooms exist and they are constantly crowded.

The new airport will not have that problem. “Passengers will never be more than 150 feet from a bathroom,” Wyatt said, adding it will have 26 banks of them eventually in gate areas.

“We overachieved, especially in the women’s restrooms. There are more stalls than required, even by code — and substantially more than are in the men’s rooms,” he said.

Stalls will be extra-long to accommodate baggage inside. They will have hooks to hang clothes if people want to change. Doors will have no cracks to help increase privacy, and stalls are tall.

Restrooms will have two banks of stalls, to allow closing one side for cleaning without closing the entire room. Men’s and Women’s rooms will have baby changing areas. Each women’s restroom will have free feminine hygiene products and a room for breastfeeding.

“Usually if an airport has one [room for breastfeeding] they are considered to have really knocked it out of the park. We’ll have 26,” Wyatt said.

He said all the little details add up to a good experience overall.

“So maybe when people are flying from Sacramento to Washington and are deciding whether to connect in Denver or Salt Lake, they’ll say, ‘I’ll go through Salt Lake,’” he said.

“Salt Lake City truly is building the nation’s premier 21st century airport,” Biskupski said. “Our teams have not simply focused on the customer convenience. They have also prioritized traveler experience and enjoyment of this facility.”




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  #663  
Old Posted Nov 9, 2019, 2:43 PM
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Southern Metro Updates - Provo breaks ground for new $40 million municipal airport terminal


Pictured, southern sector of Salt Lake City's greater CSA of the Wasatch Front. Looking West/Southwest from the eastern foothills of 12,000 foot peaks across Utah Valley with Utah Lake in the background.


By Felicia Martinez - For The Deseret News - https://www.deseret.com/utah/2019/11...rport-terminal

PROVO — The city broke ground Wednesday on a $40 million-plus terminal at the Provo Municipal Airport.

The 100,000-square-foot facility will feature four gates, a baggage claim and Transportation Security Administration stations. The structure will be configured so it could be expanded to 10 gates.

In addition to making it more convenient for travelers, Utah Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox, who attended Wednesday’s ceremony with Provo Mayor Michelle Kaufusi and other state and county leaders, said the new terminal will offer more options for travel
and business.

”This changes everything, so it’s not just Utah County, it’s a whole bunch of rural Utah. Unless you’re close enough to St. George, this really is the best option for so many of us,” Cox said.



An artist’s rendering of the new terminal at the Provo Municipal Airport. MHTN Architects

“It’s been a long time coming,” Gleason said, adding that Utah Valley’s growth projections are “through the roof,” so the terminal can do nothing but help alleviate pressure on I-15 and the Point of the Mountain.

According to a study by University of Utah’s Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute, Utah County is expected to claim 27.8% of Utah’s population by 2065, only over 1% less than Salt Lake County’s projected 29.1%.

Funding from the project will come from an estimated $8 million grant from the Federal Aviation Administration, about $19 million in dedicated funds from the city, $4.3 million from Utah County, as well as $9 million in existing bond money
approved during the last legislative session. Officials say it will not affect residents’ taxes.

The new terminal could bring in an annual economic impact equivalent to $15 million, according a news release from the city last year. The influx of flights, hotel stays, car rentals and jobs will boost the economy.

The terminal is expected to be completed in December 2021.




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  #664  
Old Posted Dec 17, 2019, 9:54 PM
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_________________________________________________________________________JetBlue founder David Neeleman to base new airline in Salt Lake City

Edward Russell - https://thepointsguy.com/news/jetblu...ake-city-moxy/

https://i1.wp.com/thepointsguy.com/w...x&w=2327&ssl=1

JetBlue Airlines and Azul founder David Neeleman will base his next airline venture in Salt Lake City as he returns to his aviation roots.

Breeze Aviation, the name of the corporation — but not necessarily the brand — that will own Neeleman’s new airline, set up shop in Salt Lake City, according to a Dec. 12 statement from the Utah Governor’s Office of
Economic Development. The Utah capital will be the headquarters for the airline, though not necessarily a hub.

Dubbed by many in the press as “Moxy” — the codename for Neeleman’s project — the new carrier hopes to begin carrying passengers in either late 2020 or early 2021. The airline will launch with used Embraer E190s
from Azul, before shifting to new Airbus A220s that begin arriving in 2021.

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However, the new carrier will may not end being called by the name Moxy, which is already used by Marriott for its millennial-focused hotel chain. Neeleman similarly called JetBlue “New Air” in the press prior to unveiling
the JetBlue name in 1999.

Neeleman’s new airline plans to fly point-to-point routes between underserved markets, bypassing major hubs like Atlanta or Chicago. However, where and when specifically is not yet known.

How Neeleman plans to launch the new venture in a year also remains to be seen. Recent attempts to start new carriers in the U.S. have been fraught with lengthy waits for approvals from the Federal Aviation Administration.
Some turned to leveraging or buying an existing airline’s operating certificate, but with little success.

Even Hawaiian Airlines, when it launched its regional subsidiary Ohana by Hawaiian in 2014, took nearly a year longer than planned due to a longer-than-expected approvals process.

Related: JetBlue founder may launch new U.S. startup ‘Moxy’ in 2020

Neeleman’s decision to land in Salt Lake City is a return home for him. Utah is where he got his start in the airline industry working, and then running, Morris Air until the carrier was sold to Southwest Airlines in 1994.


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  #665  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2019, 12:14 AM
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Be nice if his new airline would provide a direct flight between Birmingham-Shuttlesworth and MSP.
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  #666  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2019, 11:55 PM
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I'd believe when I see it. I was hoping they considering SLC hub again. it won't be affected.
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  #667  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2020, 11:49 PM
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Update - Downtown Adj. - New Salt Lake City International Airport Project Becomes A $4.1 Billion Dollar Project.

By Lee Davidson - The Salt Lake Tribune - https://www.sltrib.com/news/politics...alt-lake-city/


The price tag on the new Salt Lake City International Airport has flown upward by another half-billion dollars and now stands at $4.1 billion.

The Airport Advisory Board discussed reasons behind that on Wednesday, as it also received an update on a new master plan that is looking at long-term needs — even after the new airport is completed.

Officials said the increase comes largely from facilities that have been added or expanded to handle extra growth that has occurred since the new airport was initially planned. That includes such things as a vastly expanded Sky Club requested by Delta Air Lines, bigger areas for customs to handle more international flights and higher tech equipment to speed security screening.
These improvements have been talked about for more than a year as they were incorporated into designs. But their combined budget impact had not been talked about widely.

Bill Wyatt, executive director of the airport, said because of responsibility to bondholders on the project, the increase was first discussed with bond-rating companies in October — prior to the regularly scheduled issuance of bonds for the project.

The Airport Advisory Board was then told, and he said the Salt Lake City Council later approved the increases.

The higher costs will be covered by user fees paid by airlines and their passengers — not through local taxes — and will include some facilities requested by the airlines.

The airport was designed to handle about 10 million passengers a year, but now serves about 26 million annually. The new airport — with a new terminal, two concourses, garage and other facilities —
is being built alongside existing facilities without interrupting operations. Its first phase is scheduled to open in September.

At groundbreaking, the first phase was expected to cost $1.8 billion. Other work was added for a second phase that is also underway and includes a long-planned second concourse...The extra additions now bring it up to $4.1 billion.

Also, planners already are looking at long-term needs after the new airport is completed. Those include lengthening one of its major runways to handle larger aircraft expected to fly nonstop to Asia; reworking alignment of taxiways and runways to prevent more delays as operations expand; and obtaining and preserving more land for another runway.

“We’re pretty much concluding the work of the last master plan” by building the new airport, Wyatt said.

Steve Domino, senior planner for RS&H, the consultant working on the master plan for the next 20 years, outlined some of the increases in demand and the problems they may create. For example, in 2017 the airport served 23 million passengers a year. That is now up to 26 million a year. In 20 years, that number is expected to hit 38 million, ...probably more.

In 2017, the airport had 325,000 takeoffs and landings. In 20 years, that is expected to increase to 435,000-plus, Domino said.

The share of passengers making connections at the airport Is expected to grow from 39% to 47% as Delta is expected to increase its hub operations.

Even with a new airport that is designed to handle far more passengers, “As demand increases, the potential for delay increases as well,” Domino said. He adds the master plan has tried to identify probable demand increases and address potential problems and bottlenecks.

It found one with current designs that often requires aircraft to cut across active runways to reach other runways. With more takeoffs and landings, that may create delays. So planners are adding some “end run” taxiways that cut around the end of runways instead of across them. One proposal would go through a closed airport golf course that some have hoped to reopen.

Also, Delta Air Lines has talked openly about adding nonstop flights from Salt Lake City to a hub in South Korea after the new airport opens. But Domino said research shows that current runways are too short for the largest aircraft that officials likely would hope to use for such flights. The optimal length, he said, would be 14,500 feet long (2.75 miles) — which may require an extension of several thousand feet, depending on which of the three main runways may be expanded.

Also, the major runways now are not exactly parallel — meaning glide paths to or away from them sometimes intersect in ways such that operations on one runway can delay flights on another.

Domino said the master plan is looking at how, when and whether to realign those runways to make their operations more independent to avoid or reduce delays.

The airport also is looking at where it may want to buy or preserve land for future facilities. Domino said more may be needed to the north, south and west... — Domino said it may be wise for the airport to protect an area to the west of the airport for that.

“The airport will always be here,” he said. “We need to plan not only for the next 20 years, but beyond,” including allowing that possible runway...


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  #668  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2020, 2:24 AM
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JetBlue founder unveils new, Utah-based ‘world’s nicest airline’


By Art Raymond, For the Deseret News - https://www.deseret.com/utah/2020/2/...hwest-airlines

COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS — Almost 20 years after disrupting the staid world of U.S. airline service with the launch of JetBlue, Utah native and serial air travel entrepreneur David Neeleman is back with another project.

And once again, he’s looking to shake things up.

On Friday, Neeleman announced the official name of his new carrier, Breeze Aviation, which will also be headquartered in Utah. The move completes a circle that brings Neeleman back to the place where he grew up and also made his first moves into the airline business.

While rumors of the new effort have been circulating for months under the “Moxy” moniker, the company locked down its brand and is moving forward with a timetable aiming to have planes in the air by the end of this year.

“Add a car, add a hotel, cancel a flight, make changes, it will all be there at your fingertips. Completely hassle-free flying.” — David Neeleman, air travel entrepreneur
Breeze will be the fifth carrier startup for a guy who’s built a reputation for being something of a market oracle when it comes to the airline industry. Neeleman’s previous endeavors include Utah-based Morris Air (acquired by Southwest in 1993), WestJet (currently the No. 2 Canadian carrier), JetBlue and Azul (currently No. 3 among Brazilian domestic carriers).



JetBlue founder and Utah-native David Neeleman unveiled the name of his new, Utah-based airline on Friday. Breeze Aviation will launch later this year with a new, high-tech platform and flights between currently underserved airports. Breeze Aviation

In an interview with the Deseret News, Neeleman said the impetus behind his continued interest in airline startups boils down to a penchant for recognizing opportunity, and acting on it.

“I never started an airline just to start an airline,” Neeleman said. “Right now, we see some pretty gaping holes in the industry.”

While Breeze has not yet announced potential routes, Neeleman’s plan is to identify and leverage nonstop flights between currently underserved airports. Right now, most major carriers require passengers traveling to and from second-tier airports to connect with a regional hub, then travel on to their ultimate destination. Breeze, Neeleman said, is looking to fill in the connection gaps left by an increasingly hub-focused system.

And, he thinks it can be done in a way that scores a win-win for passengers.

“We can cut the fare in half and get them there faster,” Neeleman said. “And we’re going to do it in a completely new way.”

That new approach, according to Neeleman, will prioritize a customer-centric system focused on making all the ins and outs of air travel, well, a breeze. That will include taking a page from the success of marketplace titans like Uber and Amazon, with an app-based toolkit that will allow passengers to find tickets, change or update travel plans, and add other travel necessities like rental cars and/or accommodations without ever having to deal with a customer service network.

"The goal is to have our customers ... never having to speak with anybody, if they don’t want to,” Neeleman said. “Add a car, add a hotel, cancel a flight, make changes, it will all be there at your fingertips. Completely hassle-free flying.”

And Neeleman has a track record for bringing big innovations into the realm of air travel. During a presentation at the recent Silicon Slopes Tech Summit in Salt Lake City, Neeleman noted that while Southwest Airlines is credited by the Smithsonian Institute as pioneering e-ticketless travel, the technology was actually first launched by his debut airline, Morris Air, and became the property of Southwest after the acquisition deal. JetBlue — which pioneered free, in-flight live television programming — and Azul launched service in dozens of Brazilian cities that had previously gone without an airline connection.

Breeze has ordered 60 brand-new Airbus 220-300 aircraft, with deliveries beginning in April 2021, and has leased 30 Embraer 195 aircraft from Azul, which will be delivered starting May 2020. The company said the A220 is ideally suited for nonstop flights between mid-size markets that Breeze expects to serve while the E195s can cost-effectively connect smaller markets.

Neeleman’s latest startup has already earned support from state leaders, with the Governor’s Office of Economic Development announcing a post-performance tax rebate package for the company late last year. The package could earn Breeze as much as $1.1 million in tax rebates on plans to make over $3 million in capital investments and hire about 370 new employees. At this point, Neeleman said he does not anticipate Breeze will be providing service in or out of Salt Lake City International Airport, but other Utah airports may be in the running for new routes.

“Twenty years ago, we brought humanity back to the airline industry with JetBlue,” Neeleman said in a statement. “Today, we’re excited to introduce plans for ‘the world’s nicest airline.’”


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  #669  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2020, 2:59 PM
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Update, Southern Metro - Local executive discusses new airline- Breeze




Donna Barnes - Lehi Free - Presshttps://www.lehifreepress.com/2020/0...irline-breeze/


“Our mission is to operate out of smaller airports, with Provo being considered. We have ordered 60 Airbus 220 aircraft. These airplanes have the capacity to travel from Provo to Maui...


Lehi resident Danny Cox, Director of Guest Support and Insights at Breeze Airways, was interviewed by Lehi Free Press to describe the formation, mission, and vision of the new airline, headquartered in Salt Lake Metro's Cottonwood Heights, Utah.

Breeze Airways is the brainchild of David Neeleman, the founder of Azul airlines of Brazil, and JetBlue in the United States. According to Cox, “Neeleman is the most innovative figure in the airline business. He has started five airlines and is always thinking of new ways to improve transportation for the customer or guest.”... https://www.lehifreepress.com/2020/0...irline-breeze/


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  #670  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2020, 10:45 AM
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Central Metro - Murray Central Station To Become A Grand Central Station


Designer concept of Murray Central Station, view from Vine Street Plaza to the south. (Drawing courtesy Landmark Design)

https://locable-assets-production.s3...amp=1543529627

By Shaun Delliskave for the Murray City Journal

Gone will be the kiosks, open-air platforms, and lack of parking. Incoming will be a covered station with retail space, offices and a parking garage. Landmark Design...presented the Murray Central Station Small Area Draft Plan to city staff and members of the public, who were all given a chance to see concept designs and ask the planner questions about the project.

“From what I saw at the presentation, we have a way to go before it fits in with what we envision for the whole downtown area,” remarked Murray City Councilman Jim Brass, whose district includes the transportation node.

Landmark Design is a Salt Lake City-based landscape architecture and community planning firm that was awarded the concept plan contract. Landmark offered the open house to gather feedback for the final plan. To hire Landmark, Murray City tapped into a grant awarded by the Transportation and Land Use Connection program (TLC). The grant was given to the city specifically for the purpose of continuing development of the Murray Central TRAX and FrontRunner station.

The purpose of the TLC program is to help cities facilitate their desired growth in coordination with transportation—like TRAX—across the Wasatch Front. The TLC grant program is led by the Wasatch Front Regional Council (WFRC) and funded by a partnership of Salt Lake County, the Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT), and the Utah Transit Authority (UTA).

One prime concern for the city is the environmental impact of the station. Built on the site of the ASARCO smelters, any major construction will need approval from the EPA in order to redevelop the site for any land use other than commercial and light industrial.

Landmark Design’s study noted that retail real estate market is in flux as a result of online shopping and changes in shopper behavior. Any development would need to emphasize restaurants, entertainment, and experiential retail as the key attractors for retail formats. The Central Station area currently represents 16 percent of Murray’s retail jobs and is projected to grow by 72 percent by 2040.

Utah Transit Authority (UTA) is currently incorporating Murray Central into the Taylorsville–Murray Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) project. The BRT is in preliminary design for phase 1, from Murray Central Station to Salt Lake Community College. Phase 2, from the community college to West Valley City center, is being planned.

The Murray Central Station is important to the bike network at multiple levels—both regionally and locally. About seven percent of people accessing the station do so by bike, that’s more than double the transit system average. The study noted the station provides a nearly unparalleled opportunity to connect local cyclists with distant regional destinations. Also, a number of existing and potential regional bike corridors run through and around the station area, such as the Jordan River Parkway.

Landmark presented two visions of the station, each incorporating a total buildings footprint of approximately 150,000 square feet. A third of that space will be devoted to parking, while other buildings will mainly be office space with a mix of retail and services.





Central Metro - Recent and Ongoing Developments At Murray's Central Station


Looking West/Northwest - Serving as the geographical heart of the Central Metro/Salt Lake Valley is the City of Murray. It's quite natural that at this junction, a major confluence of Heavy Commuter Rail, Light Rail, Bus, and Interstate 15, the Murray Central Station has developed. What was once a vast smelting sight for turn of the past century mining, has been remediated into an ever-evolving major TOD.


Looking East toward the Intermountain Medical Center Campus



Seasons At Murray Crossing Apartments : At Murray Central Station


https://image1.apartmentfinder.com/i...mary-photo.jpg



Construction Completed, Now Renting

Pic By StevenF

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  #671  
Old Posted May 8, 2020, 11:41 AM
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Update - Salt Lake City International - Installation Of 'The Canyon'


Installation of a major art piece of #TheNewSLC—The Canyon—by artist Gordon Huether, spanning 362 ft. with 2.5 acres of tweave fabric,
7 miles of aluminium tubing & 500 fins. 24 templates are used to place 2,000 brackets & clamps to hold the tubing on which the fins are placed.



https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EXMBQRTV...png&name=small

Photo By Hatman

Pre Art Installation - The main hall, or 'Canyon,' or 'Crossroads of the West.' (All the airport managers who were present on the tour had a different name for it.).
Eventually the escalators right under the American Flag will take people down to the central tunnel, where they will board a people mover to the North and Far North concourses.


Photo By Hatman

Pre Art Installation - The same hall, but now looking south toward the unsecured areas.



A rendering of the completed Canyon art installation

https://gordonhuether.com/wp-content...68c73aac4e.jpg

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Last edited by delts145; May 8, 2020 at 12:16 PM.
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  #672  
Old Posted May 8, 2020, 4:53 PM
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It would be almost ironic if Murray builds a nice central train station before SLC has one. They are certainly in a central position on the network.

I mean, SLC has two historic train stations that are both (functionally) derelict and a "central station" that's basically an empty platform with a Greyhound bus station. If that's not bad planning/utilization I don't know what is. I'm all for Hatman's plan, or for UTA to get moving on its new HQ and station alongside TRAX extensions in downtown.
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  #673  
Old Posted May 10, 2020, 3:20 PM
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Agree. I'm sure it's only a matter of time. We see how much has been built up in the past 10 to 20 years. Even these past five have brought about a lot of change. I really would like to see the Rio Grande depot function as the Central Station. It's amazing that Salt Lake has two gorgeous historic depots downtown. Let's use at least one of them for something other than a boutique hotel.
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Old Posted May 21, 2020, 1:02 PM
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Downtown Update - Salt Lake City To Reconstruct 200 South


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Originally Posted by blah_amazing View Post

Quote: SALT LAKE CITY — One of Salt Lake City's most consequential east-west corridors is set for a major facelift in the coming years, and officials are asking for public feedback on the project as it gets off the ground.

200 South will be reconstructed between 400 West and 900 East beginning in 2022, officials said in a Facebook presentation Wednesday morning.

Salt Lake City transportation engineer Kyle Cook talked through a slideshow on the project, along with Kimberly Feldbauer and Jodi Pearson of AECOM, a Los Angeles-based engineering firm. They explained the beginning phases of a plan to — as one project fact sheet puts it — "create an iconic corridor where businesses thrive, residents feel comfortable and safe walking, transit users navigate easily, and visitors build lasting memories."

Practically, this means repaving the streets, creating better transportation options and accessibility, and building a multimodal transportation hub on the route, Cook said.

"Because the pavement on 200 South has reached the end of its useful life," he said, "it's in rough shape, and it needs attention."

Cook said the 200 South Corridor Plan is "building on a foundation of work that's already been done" in the Salt Lake City Transit Master Plan. 200 South was the highest-priority corridor of the master plan, he said.

Cook said the project could be financed by the 2018 Funding Our Future bond, sales tax revenue, county funds and "other state and federal resources that we continue to explore."

"We know this corridor is more than just a street," he said. "It serves so many homes, and jobs and destinations. 200 South, in many ways, is the focal point of Salt Lake's cultural and economic engine."

Feldbauer talked through potential options the final design could incorporate — "floating" bus stops that don't require curbside pull-ins, dedicated bus lanes and "creative" crosswalks among them.

The proposed transit hub, she said, would include access to multiple transportation options and give residents a reason to gather there with attractive landscaping and possibly live events.

The presenters gave multiple ways Salt Lake City residents can submit feedback on the 200 South Corridor Plan. A comment line has been established at 855-752-2007 and residents can reach project planners via email at 200South@SLCGov.com.

The project website also has space to submit comments or take a survey, which will gather information about how locals utilize the corridor.


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  #675  
Old Posted May 22, 2020, 4:26 AM
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https://www.sltrib.com/news/politics...may-help-salt/

Coronavirus may help Salt Lake airport finish expansion 2 years early and save $300M

Quote:
Airport officials had planned to continue to use many gates in the adjacent existing terminals for a time in a complicated process in which some would be demolished to expand new concourses over where they had stood. Then the airport would tear down and expand a few more gates and repeat that expensive process for years.
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  #676  
Old Posted May 22, 2020, 11:37 AM
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A bit of a silver lining. I honestly don't think it's going to take 5 to 6 years for SLC International to get back to pre-COVOD levels. As FORBES was recently touting, SLC will be one of the ten fastest metros to recover in the U.S. I think Salt Lake is going to continue to explode in growth during the recovery and this new airport being finished even earlier than expected will be able to take advantage of its continued growth explosion.


Downtown Adj. - COVID To Allow New Salt Lake City International To Finish As Much As Two Years Ahead Of Schedule

By Lee Davidson for the Salt Lake Tribune - https://www.sltrib.com/news/politics...may-help-salt/

Salt Lake City International Airport saw only 13% of its normal number of passengers Wednesday. But the alarming drop has an upside: an unexpected opportunity to save hundreds of millions of dollars and complete its ongoing $4.1 billion replacement project years early. Officials say the dearth of passengers will allow the early demolition of existing old terminals and concourses, which no longer will be needed during later phases of expansion to supply gates for once-expected high demand now erased by the coronavirus pandemic. So, expansion now “will be two years faster and up to $300 million cheaper,” Executive Director Bill Wyatt told the city’s airport advisory board Wednesday as he unveiled the plans. The airport aims to open the first phase of replacement facilities Sept. 15, including a new terminal and concourse. Part of a second parallel concourse is scheduled to open a month later. Airport officials had planned to continue to use many gates in the adjacent existing terminals for a time in a complicated process in which some would be demolished to expand new concourses over where they had stood. Then the airport would tear down and expand a few more gates and repeat that expensive process for years. Wyatt said that was initially needed to maintain the number of gates that airlines said they needed at the heretofore busy airport. But like all airports in America, Salt Lake City’s is no longer busy.

“Today, we’re anticipating 3,400 passengers," Wyatt said. “Ordinarily, it would be 26,000 or 27,000. A month ago, it was only 1,500.”...

...“What we’re proposing to do instead of keeping old Concourse B and old Concourse C open, is to tear down the existing airport facilities after the new SLC phase one is open — tear them all down at once,” he said. “That will deliver the whole project much more quickly and save as much as $300 million.”



(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) The area known as The Canyon begins to take shape with crews stretching fabric over metal fins
to simulate southern Utah canyon walls during the first phase of construction of the Salt Lake City International Airport on Wednesday, May 20, 2020.


(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Crews continue their work in the first phase of construction of the Salt Lake City Int. Airport.



(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Crews continue their work in the first phase of construction of the Salt Lake City Int. Airport.




Update - The New Salt Lake City International Airport - Installation Of 'The Canyon'


Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePusherMan View Post
Art is going up. Getting really close!

https://twitter.com/slcairport/statu...637094921?s=20
Installation of a major art piece of #TheNewSLC—The Canyon—by artist Gordon Huether, spanning 362 ft. with 2.5 acres of tweave fabric,
7 miles of aluminium tubing & 500 fins. 24 templates are used to place 2,000 brackets & clamps to hold the tubing on which the fins are placed.



https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EXMBQRTV...png&name=small

Photo By Hatman

Pre Art Installation - The main hall, or 'Canyon,' or 'Crossroads of the West.' (All the airport managers who were present on the tour had a different name for it.).
Eventually the escalators right under the American Flag will take people down to the central tunnel, where they will board a people mover to the North and Far North concourses.


Photo By Hatman

Pre Art Installation - The same hall, but now looking south toward the unsecured areas.




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Old Posted May 26, 2020, 1:12 PM
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By Steve Griffin, Deseret News

More on the: Pandemic could shorten Salt Lake airport rebuild by 2 years, save $300M

Katie McKellar - Deseret News - May 22nd

https://www.deseret.com/utah/2020/5/...-save-millions

For a gigantic construction project — which saw costs increase amid a red-hot construction market before the pandemic hit — that condensed timeline is a great opportunity to save money, and headaches of trying to demolish old facilities and build at the same time.But, Wyatt said, the plan “is not an easy thing. It comes with a certain amount of pain.” Airlines have been pushing for more gates, faster, “and I love their enthusiasm,” Wyatt told the airport board. “But my job, as well, is to look out for Salt Lake City, and I think this approach is going to leave us with greater flexibility, less (cost), faster delivery. And I just think we’re going to be in really good shape.”

Before the coronavirus changed the world, roughly 30,000 passengers were walking through Salt Lake City International Airport’s door every day, Wyatt said. That number then plummeted to roughly 1,500 passengers a day — which, ahead of Memorial Day weekend, was up to about 4,100 on Friday, Wyatt told the Deseret News. Though the airport is seeing a bit more travelers as states begin to open, Wyatt said airport officials don’t expect to return to their typical demand for at least three to five years. By then, the airport’s redevelopment should be complete. But if demand begins to spike earlier than expected, Wyatt said the airport can use a concept called “hard stand,” or parking airplanes in the airfield and transporting passengers from the plane by bus to the airport. “It’s not ideal,” Wyatt acknowledged, “but it’s a short-term way to absorb increases that maybe are not anticipated.”...

...Heading into the future, Wyatt said the new airport, once it opens in September, will be a positive experience for COVID-19-wary travelers. Not to mention, he added, the new airport is “just so much bigger,” so it will be easy for travelers to social distance.
From self bag tagging and electronic board passes, to motion-sensor soap dispensers and sink faucets, Wyatt said the new airport will have several new additions to ensure safe and clean travel. They airport will also have disinfecting devices that will clip on to the end of moving walkway rails so they’ll be sanitized frequently.

“It will feel different than people had anticipated an airport will feel,” Wyatt said, “but we also want to make sure we’re doing everything possible to keep our friends and neighbors safe.”




Hightech Signs employees work in the Hip & Humble shop space as construction of the new Salt Lake International Airport continues in Salt Lake City on Friday, May 22, 2020. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News


Construction continues on the new Salt Lake International Airport in Salt Lake City on Friday, May 22, 2020. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News


Installation of Gordon Huether’s “The Canyon” has started as construction continues at the new Salt Lake International Airport in Salt Lake City on Friday, May 22, 2020. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

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Old Posted Yesterday, 11:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hatman View Post
The Salt Lake City Stadler assembly facility now has an electrified test track!

https://www.railwayage.com/passenger...nset-on-track/

Some pictures of the Caltrain double-decker EMU's bound for San Francisco, sitting on the test track. These trains are the same sort of rolling stock UTA is interested in using on an electrified FrontRunner, and the test track itself sits right along the alignment I laid out for the East-West commuter rail line between Salt Lake City and Tooele (see my sig line below). So who knows? Maybe one day we'll get the same picture of a red, white, and blue UTA electric EMU traveling this same line full of happy commuters!





Also, Trump tweeted about the Ogden BRT project today. The funding is old news. I have no idea why he is interested in this project now.
https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/...31862633811968
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