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  #7141  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2020, 8:21 PM
midasmull midasmull is offline
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Originally Posted by Dartguard View Post
My Dad mentioned years ago that he was under the impression that the last act of the Gerry Regan Liberal government was buying the land downtown that eventually held the New Metro Center. The owner of the land had been Mrs Regan.
Sounds plausible but the dates might be a bit off. He lost the premiership in 1978 but the property was sold from the Province to the City in 1977. No indication when the Province acquired the land but it's not likely it was the last act of his gov't - any idea what was there before the Metro Centre?
     
     
  #7142  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2020, 9:40 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Originally Posted by midasmull View Post
Sounds plausible but the dates might be a bit off. He lost the premiership in 1978 but the property was sold from the Province to the City in 1977. No indication when the Province acquired the land but it's not likely it was the last act of his gov't - any idea what was there before the Metro Centre?
There were a number of buildings there, including the Schofield Paper Company building on the corner of Brunswick and Duke St., the old Moirs Chocolate factory and related buildings, and a number of smaller structures.





Above pics from Halifax Municipal Archives
Quote:
File consists of images of the front, side, and rear elevations of the [former] Schofield Paper Company building on the corner of Brunswick and Duke St. This building, and many others in the area, was razed to make way for the Halifax Metro Centre sometime around 1977. The side of a Halifax Transit bus can be seen in image 1044.2 and a few pedestrians have been captured in the other images. These prints were found amongst those in file 102-39-1-1396, which pictures the construction of the Metro Centre.




Above images also from municipal archives...
Quote:
File consists of images of the former Moirs factory and warehouse taken from many points of view: Duke & Argyle (1423.1), Argyle & Duke (1423.2), George & Argyle (1423.3), George & Grafton (1423.4), George & Market (1423.5), Market & Duke (1423.6), Market & George (1423.7), George & Argyle (1423.8). The captions on the backs of the prints indicate that these photographs were taken before the factory's demolition in 1975-76.
From the Noticed In Nova Scotia Blog:


Also, from Halifax Municipal Archives:

Quote:
City of Halifax fonds
Halifax (N.S.). Committee on Works records
Halifax (N.S.) Works Department photographs
1807 Brunswick St. [Jost Mission]
Retrieval code: 102-39-1-806
[1976?]
Quote:
File consists of an image of the front of the Jost Mission building, which was demolished in 1976 in order to build the Metro Centre.
Also from Noticed In Nova Scotia:





From Municipal Archives again:


Quote:
File consists of images documenting the Halifax Metro Centre excavation site, formerly the site of the City Market Building, located in the block between Duke and George streets and Brunswick and Argyle streets. The photographs were taken from many vantage points and include in the background views of Citadel Hill, Cogswell Towers, Scotia Square Towers, the former Schofield Paper Company Building, the former Jost Mission building, and many other buildings and business in the area, some of which were soon demolished to make way for the construction of the Metro Centre. See file 102-39-1-1369 for images documenting the construction of the Metro Centre.
     
     
  #7143  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2020, 9:58 PM
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Originally Posted by midasmull View Post
Sounds plausible but the dates might be a bit off. He lost the premiership in 1978 but the property was sold from the Province to the City in 1977. No indication when the Province acquired the land but it's not likely it was the last act of his gov't - any idea what was there before the Metro Centre?
I can't say that I recall that Regan or his wife Carole had any stake in the Metro Centre lands but Mr. Regan was nothing if not an opportunist. You are right that the Metro Centre wasn't built until 1978 but Regan was known to have lobbied for a downtown location for the arena when he was premier.

The east (Argyle Street) side of the Metro Centre lands was originally occupied by the Moirs chocolate works, though those buildings were demolished after the plant moved to Woodside in Dartmouth in 1975. The west (Brunswick Street) side had a collection of buildings. But I didn't find information about the ownership chain on these properties in a quick search.
     
     
  #7144  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2020, 11:30 PM
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Wow! Times certainly change. To think I was alive when most of those photos in OldDartmouthMark's post were taken.

I have no recollection of that part of the city prior to Scotia Square being built, but I grew up on PEI and only visited Halifax maybe twice before I moved there in 1979.

I do remember the big hole in the ground next to the Metro Centre before they built the WTCC though.
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  #7145  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2020, 11:46 PM
elly63 elly63 is offline
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Originally Posted by ns_kid View Post
The east (Argyle Street) side of the Metro Centre lands was originally occupied by the Moirs chocolate works, though those buildings were demolished after the plant moved to Woodside in Dartmouth in 1975.
We interrupt this thread for a brief historical passage.

Excerpt on Moirs Chocolates from Janis Thiessen’s Snacks: A Canadian Food History
Janis Thiessen The Acadiensis Blog January 17, 2018



...

Moirs was a source of pride for Maritimers, as it was the only business in Halifax with a national product (early 1800's).

Liberace was featured in advertisements for Pot of Gold in 1975—his first commercial work.

The majority of workers at Moirs were women, and (for a time) the majority of women employed in Halifax were employed at Moirs. Three of every five women working outside the home in Halifax in 1891 were Moirs workers.

...

Back to our regularly scheduled thread.
     
     
  #7146  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2020, 1:14 PM
beyeas beyeas is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
Wow! Times certainly change. To think I was alive when most of those photos in OldDartmouthMark's post were taken.

I have no recollection of that part of the city prior to Scotia Square being built, but I grew up on PEI and only visited Halifax maybe twice before I moved there in 1979.

I do remember the big hole in the ground next to the Metro Centre before they built the WTCC though.
I was thinking the same thing! I cannot remember all those buildings, and yet I must have seen them because we used to visit Halifax most years (in particular if my dad was attending the Atlantic Radiology Conference etc). A lot has changed!
     
     
  #7147  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2020, 3:17 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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It's funny, I don't have any personal recollections of them either, even though I remember the Metro Centre being built, and recall attending the first hockey game ever played there. But I was young at the time and didn't pay much attention to old buildings back then, so what was there before wouldn't have been significant to me at the time.

Which is why it's neat to be able to research what was there and see them online due to the archive sites and Mr. Archibald's excellent blog.
     
     
  #7148  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2020, 3:22 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Originally Posted by elly63 View Post
We interrupt this thread for a brief historical passage.

Excerpt on Moirs Chocolates from Janis Thiessen’s Snacks: A Canadian Food History
Janis Thiessen The Acadiensis Blog January 17, 2018



...

Moirs was a source of pride for Maritimers, as it was the only business in Halifax with a national product (early 1800's).

Liberace was featured in advertisements for Pot of Gold in 1975—his first commercial work.

The majority of workers at Moirs were women, and (for a time) the majority of women employed in Halifax were employed at Moirs. Three of every five women working outside the home in Halifax in 1891 were Moirs workers.

...

Back to our regularly scheduled thread.
Thanks for the info. It is of particular interest to me as my grandfather, who passed away before I was born, had worked there as a foreman. Also, one of my aunts worked there and later moved to the Woodside location when it moved.

In a sense it was sad to see Moirs eventually being sold off to a conglomerate, thus losing its unique status of being Halifax-based, but it's the way it goes sometimes... it's business.

Here's a view of the Moir's complex at Argyle Street, where the trade centre is now located. The date is 1975, just before it was torn down.



Source
     
     
  #7149  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2020, 3:16 AM
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teddifax teddifax is offline
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When in High School in 1972, I was a member of Junior Achievement. We had our work space in this complex somewhere...
     
     
  #7150  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2020, 12:47 AM
Colin May Colin May is offline
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https://theprovince.com/sports/footb...ee-is-its-past

For once, Randy Ambrosie would like to tell a different story when he comes to Vancouver: A story in which the dusty old CFL reinvents itself as football’s pre-eminent global league; a story in which players from all over the world suit up for CFL teams and a massive global audience watches CFL games.

This is the key to the Canadian game’s glorious new future and Ambrosie, the league’s commissioner, is enthusiastic about this vision. Actually, he’s been enthusiastic about CFL 2.0 since it was first introduced three years ago, and little has happened since to dampen his conviction.

“The 2.0 strategy is entirely about making it clear we’re going to be global and there’s room in the CFL family for everyone,” he said Monday. “You have to set a new tone. We’ve been the same thing for a long time.”

There’s just one problem. The B.C. Lions are still that same thing and it’s hard to talk about CFL 2.0 when CFL 1.0 is all anybody sees in this province.

On Monday, Ambrosie made his third straight off-season trip to Vancouver since taking over the big office and, for the third straight time, his sales pitch was hijacked by the melodrama over the Lions’ sale and the team’s off-field issues.

The former offensive lineman wanted to talk about the 10 different scouting combines the CFL will have hosted this winter on four different continents. He wanted to talk about the 24 best international recruits who have already been invited to the CFL combine in Toronto at the end of March, including Japanese running back Taku Lee, a player Ambrosie said is made for the CFL.

He wanted, in short, to tell Lions supporters that a new day is coming for the CFL and it will change the Canadian game as we know it. But, in this market, that message is a tough sell. In this market, all we know is that the Lions have been for sale forever, they’ve alienated their fan base, and neither situation appears close to resolution.

“I think (Lions owner David Braley) is committed to putting this team in a new set of hands,” said Ambrosie. “I’ve been very encouraged about my time with David.”

Great. So could a sale be imminent?

“It’s so difficult. As soon as you put an artificial timeline, you put unnecessary pressure on this,” Ambrosie said.

Figured as much.

On Monday, Ambrosie and Lions president Rick LeLacheur painted a picture in which several parties are interested in buying the Lions, but Braley won’t sell unless he has full confidence that the new owners are committed to the league and the market.

A local group led by insurance man Mark Woodall and car dealer Moray Keith — who were certainly committed to the Leos and the CFL — tried unsuccessfully to buy the Lions on more than one occasion and eventually grew frustrated by the drawn-out process.

They dropped out last fall. As for fresh blood, Braley’s health, which has been a continuing concern, further slowed things over the last couple of months, leaving the Lions in the same state of limbo they have occupied for over a decade.

“I really thought we’d get it done last year,” said LeLacheur, before adding, “Nothing’s really happened the last two months. We’ve got three or four guys. We’ve got a guy who wants to do it at the end of this season. We’ll see what happens.”

In the meantime, Lions’ season-ticket sales have flatlined at about 9,000 and there’s little to suggest the 2020 season will be different than last year or the year before when the Leos struggled mightily at the gate. It would help if they get off to a quick start under new coach Rick Campbell.

But it’s going to take a long time to win back all the fans the Lions have lost since the 2011 Grey Cup, even if Ambrosie said the Leos aren’t alone in their fight.

“The entire nature of our league is to think differently than it did five years ago,” said Ambrosie. “Five years ago the B.C. Lions might have been on an island. We’re not thinking about it that way anymore. We have a lot of resources at the league office. This franchise can have a lot of people helping from around the league. It’s a team effort. There are more than enough resources to make this happen while David decides on the team’s future.”

Then there’s the league’s future. The CFL has invested heavily in this newly imagined league promoted by Ambrosie. Maybe they didn’t have a choice in the matter. Maybe they had to plot a bold new course to have any chance at survival.

There is, after all, much about 2.0 that is intriguing. But in the here and now this new league is facing the same old problems, and it’s hard to get excited about its future when all you see is its past.
     
     
  #7151  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2020, 1:53 AM
elly63 elly63 is offline
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And that has what to do with a Halifax stadium? Just another in your long line of not so thinly disguised anti football, pro soccer agenda posts?

How about this, all three Canadian MLS teams' attendance is down. TFC 6% and the other two over 10%, are we still on topic? You must have loved this:

Touchdown Atlantic tickets appear to be moving fast
3Down Staff March 2, 2020
     
     
  #7152  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2020, 3:10 AM
Colin May Colin May is offline
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Originally Posted by elly63 View Post
And that has what to do with a Halifax stadium? Just another in your long line of not so thinly disguised anti football, pro soccer agenda posts?

How about this, all three Canadian MLS teams' attendance is down. TFC 6% and the other two over 10%, are we still on topic? You must have loved this:

Touchdown Atlantic tickets appear to be moving fast
3Down Staff March 2, 2020
Not an MLS fan. And not a Wanderers fan. Just thought it was an interesting article.
And funny :'Going global' is both funny and delusional.
     
     
  #7153  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2020, 10:03 PM
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Not an MLS fan. And not a Wanderers fan. Just thought it was an interesting article.
And funny :'Going global' is both funny and delusional.
Why? If they get a few international players that lead to Broadcast Deals in those countries to increase revenue, why is that delusional?
     
     
  #7154  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2020, 1:33 AM
elly63 elly63 is offline
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Originally Posted by Colin May View Post
both funny and delusional.
Not unlike many of your posts. How about getting back to stadium news.
     
     
  #7155  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2020, 1:35 AM
elly63 elly63 is offline
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Why? If they get a few international players that lead to Broadcast Deals in those countries to increase revenue, why is that delusional?
Sorry for the off topic but I just read Australia will be playing Canadian rules because they think it is a better game.
     
     
  #7156  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2020, 3:15 AM
riders78 riders78 is offline
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As someone who is from Saskatchewan I just wanted to commend the people of Halifax. On Ticketmaster the Touchdown Atlantic is very nearly sold out and it has just been presale codes. That's impressive. Additionally there will be hundreds of thousands of people across Canada and the U.S. who will see Halifax and it's skyline on TSN and ESPN2. In the future when this stadium happens it will be 10 or 11 times a year and when your great city (I have loved visiting Halifax in the past!) hosts a Grey Cup there will be millions of people watching Halifax.
     
     
  #7157  
Old Posted Apr 3, 2020, 7:37 PM
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Found the Halifax Commonwealth Games stadium plans on my computer from over 10 years ago.

This is a 50,000 seat capacity plan.






Last edited by q12; Apr 3, 2020 at 7:49 PM.
     
     
  #7158  
Old Posted Apr 3, 2020, 8:39 PM
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Found the Halifax Commonwealth Games stadium plans on my computer from over 10 years ago.

This is a 50,000 seat capacity plan.

Thank goodness we didn't get suckered into that debacle.
     
     
  #7159  
Old Posted Apr 4, 2020, 3:52 AM
Colin May Colin May is offline
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Originally Posted by elly63 View Post
Not unlike many of your posts. How about getting back to stadium news.
Maybe the recession will see a stadium for $20,000,000 or maybe the CFL will fold before the season start.
Not sure how TSN will survive. Not sure the EPL ,La Liga etc will survive.
All bets are off.
     
     
  #7160  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2020, 11:39 AM
c-way-dude c-way-dude is offline
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It's unlikely the CFL will have a 2020 season, but I don't see any reason why the league would fold. The league currently has a better set of stadiums than it ever has. There are fans already longing to return to normal life attending games and watching games on television. The lack of sports is more likely to build than dampen enthusiasm, at least in the short term when sports return, IMO.
http://si.com/mlb/2020/04/10/sports-...ming-back-soon
     
     
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