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  #41  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2022, 5:58 PM
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You're probably right sadly and especially if Dougie wins again. He will just force it on us. Developers will keep crying if they can't build out million dollar+ homes in Elfrida and stress our infrastructure more for the benefit of a few versus the many.
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  #42  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2022, 2:27 AM
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Bratina will take more time to decide on mayoral run
https://www.thespec.com/news/hamilto...mended_for_you
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  #43  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2022, 2:39 PM
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I wonder how much support he's actually received about the idea. Probably a lot from his old base, but the city has changed, even in the relatively short time since he was elected mayor in 2010. There are probably a lot of new residents who say "Bob who?"
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  #44  
Old Posted Mar 29, 2022, 12:06 PM
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The old shoe has dropped:

Bob Bratina says he’d be ‘veteran hand at the till’ if elected mayor
Former Liberal MP, mayor and broadcaster says he’s running


https://www.thespec.com/news/hamilto...b-bratina.html

Teviah Moro
The Hamilton Spectator
Mon., March 28, 2022


Bob Bratina is jumping into the race to become Hamilton’s next mayor.

The former Liberal MP, who was mayor before entering federal politics, announced his plan to run for the top municipal job Monday.

He told CHML he’d be a “veteran hand at the till” for what’s shaping up to be a council with at least a few fresh faces after the Oct. 24 election.

Bratina, who was mayor from 2010 to 2014, said the “instability” that Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has caused, including soaring gas prices, compelled him to make his announcement.

“So there are a whole lot of issues with affordability that are confronting Hamiltonians,” he told radio host and Spectator columnist Scott Radley.

Bratina touted low tax hikes during his time in local office, while landing benefits, such as the new West Harbour GO Station and new football stadium.

“If you apply the basic principles of running a household to a city, you can make sure that the money that you are spending is well spent — value for tax money.”

Bratina announces his intention to enter the race after another well-known contender, former chamber of commerce head Keanin Loomis, publicized his campaign in January.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger, who is serving the final months of his second consecutive term, has yet to say whether he’ll seek re-election.

“I have not decided at this time but I would not bet against it!” he told The Spectator via email in January.

Eisenberger, who was also mayor from 2006 to 2010, has been a steady proponent of Hamilton’s long-planned LRT project, which has $3.4 billion in federal-provincial construction dollars committed to it.

Bratina, on the other hand, announced last May he wouldn’t seek federal re-election because of the Liberal government’s decision to contribute $1.7 billion to help reboot the once-cancelled light-rail initiative.

“Well, the LRT discussion is in the hands of city council, and, as the mayor under our system, I have one vote,” he told Radley during Monday’s broadcast.

But he added, “we need to look at a Plan B in case” pressures like inflation and rising interest rates “force the government to make other decisions.”

The former broadcaster’s time as mayor was punctuated by conflict, including a council vote in 2012 to censure him over his role in a $30,000 raise for his chief of staff.

“It was a time on council of personal attacks,” he told Radley. “When we stuck to the business of the city, things worked very well.”

The first day candidates can submit nomination papers is May 2. The nomination period ends Aug. 19.
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  #45  
Old Posted Mar 29, 2022, 2:01 PM
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Go enjoy that platinum government retirement pension Bob.
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  #46  
Old Posted Mar 29, 2022, 3:27 PM
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I found this to be a very odd comment. But there are some who will eat it up with spoons:
"Bratina, who was mayor from 2010 to 2014, said the “instability” that Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has caused, including soaring gas prices, compelled him to make his announcement."

If we do apply the basic principles of running a household to this case, we would be helping him downsize and look for living space where future assistance will be available.
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  #47  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2022, 5:38 PM
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CBC's version. Includes some stuff about Loomis and Partridge.


Bob Bratina announces plans to run for Hamilton mayor, says he offers 'veteran knowledge'

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamil...ayor-1.6400868

Dan Taekema
CBC News
Mar 29, 2022




Bob Bratina says he suspects there will be new faces around the council table come October and is making the pitch it would help to have a familiar one too — his.

The veteran politician said he plans to run for mayor when nominations open in May, promising a positive, forward-looking campaign.

"There needs to be a little bit of stability in terms of veteran knowledge of how a city council works," he told CBC Hamilton Tuesday morning, the day after announcing his intentions to run during an interview on CHML.

"I think it's hard to disagree with the fact that you can't just completely throw everybody out and start all over again. There are ramifications to that."

Bratina, a former broadcaster, previously served as Hamilton's mayor from 2010 to 2014.

He was elected as MP for Hamilton East-Stoney Creek for the Liberals in 2015 and again in 2019, but broke with the party over its support of Hamilton's light-rail transit (LRT) project.

Bratina has been a vocal critic of LRT since his time on council. In May last year, he announced he wouldn't run federally again, and teased then about the possibility of throwing his hat back in the ring for mayor.


Loomis calls himself an 'unpolitician'

On Tuesday Bratina said he thinks people are "tired" of hearing about LRT, noting it's "on a course of its own" and in the hands of councillors.

"If I were to become mayor, with the council, I would have one of 16 votes."

Bratina joins Keanin Loomis, who stepped down from his role as the CEO of Hamilton's Chamber of Commerce in January to run for the top job on city council.

Loomis said he'll work to get LRT built and has described himself as an "unpolitician," having never run for office before.

"Change isn't just what I'm looking for, it's what everybody I talk to seems to be looking for," Loomis previously told CBC. "I know I have a lot more to give this community and I'm ready to do that."

Bratina said he views himself as a bit of an "unpolitician" too, saying he's applied term limits of his own throughout his times in office. He said he has no interest in being a career politician, before acknowledging that may sound funny coming from someone who's held elected office since 2004.

The mayoral hopeful also said he believes there's a learning curve to municipal politics and suggested Loomis should have tried for a council seat before setting his sights on mayor.

Fred Eisenberger, Hamilton's current mayor, said Tuesday that he hasn't made a final decision on whether to run again, but "I would not bet against it."

He added the window for nominations runs from May to August and he will make a decision during that time.


Coun. Judi Partridge not running for re-election

Monday brought other news in municipal politics, with longtime Ward 15 councillor Judi Partridge announcing she won't be running for re-election.

Partridge was first elected to council in 2010 and has held onto the role since. A media release announcing she's leaving described her as a "no-nonsense advocate" for residents of Waterdown and Flamborough.

"There are very few communities like ours, and I feel very blessed to live here and to serve you as councillor," she was quoted as saying.

Three other council seats may be up for grabs in the fall. Sam Merulla (Ward 4) has announced he will retire later this year, Brenda Johnson (Ward 11) also posted on her website in January she is ready for a change, and Ward 5 councillor Russ Powers has said he won't run. Powers was selected as councillor in November after Chad Collins was elected as MP in September.

Bratina said he's coming back to municipal politics in hopes of helping Hamiltonians.

"I'm seeing concerns for affordability, for families continuing to live and prosper and young people to buy houses," he said.


Bratina says 'past is for memoirs'

His term as mayor included arguments with councillors, a censure vote and an integrity commissioner investigation.

On Tuesday he declined to speak about it in depth, saying "the past is for memoirs" and adding that he believes that council at that time functioned well.

He did say most of the "antagonists of the past" have moved on, describing the municipal officials of those days as "an old boys group who were around since roughly the beginning of the century."

Now, Bratina said, he's focused on the future.

He's 77, but said he views any suggestion that could preclude him from running as "ageism," noting with a laugh that he's healthy and even considered running Around the Bay this year.

"The main thing I have … is the passion for it," he said. "If the electorate decides it's time for me to go, that's fine. It's up to them. But it's not up to pundits to say what I should or shouldn't do."

Municipal elections will be held on Oct. 24. All potential candidates have until Aug. 19 to file nomination papers.
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  #48  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2022, 5:42 PM
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  #49  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2022, 12:00 AM
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Please no.
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  #50  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2022, 8:40 PM
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Farr out, man
(though I assume he'll slide back into being a paid councillor and be running in the fall municipal election should he not become an MPP)


Competition for Hamilton East-Stoney Creek heating up as Coun. Farr joins the race
NDP set to announce Zaigham Butt, 28, as their candidate to keep the riding orange


https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamil...butt-1.6422572

Coun. Jason Farr has decided to try his hand at provincial politics.

The former broadcaster has represented Hamilton's Ward 2 for 12 years, but has announced plans to run for the Ontario Liberals in Hamilton East–Stoney Creek.

Party leader Steven Del Duca introduced Farr as a candidate during a media conference on Monday.

Farr described his decision as a "return to his roots" and the next step in his evolution as an elected official.

"It's more than a homecoming for myself, it's an affirmation that my decades of public service and city-building as a local councillor," he said, adding he can't imagine not being in a position where he can give back to the community.

"It's a very, very rewarding career in public service and one that I don't take for granted."

Del Duca pointed to Farr's track record as a councillor and thanked him for bringing "all of your experience, all of your talent, all of your dedication" to the party.

The seat in Hamilton East–Stoney Creek has been held by NDP MPP Paul Miller since 2007, but it may be up for grabs after the party abruptly announced last month that he had been kicked out.

The NDP said Miller was a member of a Facebook group Worldwide Coalition Against Islam and that he was removed following a "pattern of troubling behaviour" that indicated he may "harbour Islamophobic, homophobic and racist views."

Miller previously told CBC that the allegations were "totally fabricated and false," saying the "truth will rise to the top … and once again the NDP will be embarrassed."

He has also reportedly said he did not write his own Facebook posts, and that he plans to run as an independent.


NDP candidate says campaign about people, not profit

The NDP is set to announce Zaigham Butt as their candidate in the riding on Tuesday evening.

"The riding has been an NDP riding and we will ensure that it stays orange," the 28-year-old told CBC Monday afternoon.

The first-time candidate grew up in the riding, attending both elementary and high school in the area. He pointed to his "extensive relationships" in the community and said he's already receiving lots of support.

He was named to the Order of Hamilton earlier this year, with the citation stating he was being recognized for his contributions to the community, including leading teams that cleaned up Wagner Beach Park and graffiti downtown as well as his work with the Pakistan Business Association, which included delivering food hampers to families struggling during the pandemic.

Butt said his campaign will be about "people and not profit," saying he'll focus on affordability and improving long-term care.

"As a first-generation immigrant whose family struggled at various times to make ends meet, I know the challenges with trying to grow a family in a society where too many people fall behind," he said.

Neil Lumsden, a former CFL player, Brock University athletic director and manager of sports marketing agency, is running for the Ontario PC Party in the riding.

"If we've learned anything from the health care and economic challenges of past few years, it's that the world is unpredictable – no single person and no political party has all the answers in a binder," reads a quote on Lumsden's website.

"I know from my own experience that teams can accomplish things that individuals cannot and I'll bring this passion to Queen's Park for the people of Hamilton East-Stoney Creek."

The Green Party of Ontario has yet to announce who will represent it in Hamilton East–Stoney Creek.


Farr will go without council pay

Farr said friends, including former mayors Bob Bratina and Larry Di Ianni, encouraged him to run for a spot at Queen's Park.

The idea has been on the "hot burner" for months, he explained, adding he was also inspired while helping fellow former council member Chad Collins and in his successful run for the federal Liberals last year.

The main message he heard while knocking on doors during that election was a rising concern about political polarization and decisive views, said Farr, adding that's part of what drew him to the Liberals.

Farr said he would be forgoing his council pay during his campaign, as other councillors have done in the past.

"That said," he wrote in a text message to CBC. "I know there will be occasions where I may be needed and certainly our office is highly capable of supporting constituents during the month."
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  #51  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2022, 8:53 PM
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Given that the Liberals are in a pretty solid 3rd place running in Hamilton East Stoney Creek... that's pretty likely.
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  #52  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2022, 3:30 PM
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So does this mean Farr's seat will be open at City Council or can he just revert back after he doesn't get the MPP seat (since Municipal election will be afterwards)?
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  #53  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2022, 3:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by craftbeerdad View Post
So does this mean Farr's seat will be open at City Council or can he just revert back after he doesn't get the MPP seat (since Municipal election will be afterwards)?
exactly that. If he loses the provincial election, which is fairly likely, he will still be able to run for council again. Pauls did the same thing in 2018, running for the PCs then falling back to Council following the election loss.

If anything, the most concerning fact from this all is that the departure of Miller from the riding and the arrival of Farr with a "big" name means that the liberals may pull enough voters away from the NDP to let the PCs slide up the middle and take the riding when nobody is looking.

It's a pretty solid NDP riding regardless though, so I would be surprised if that happens. I really just don't see a route for Farr to win in the riding. If the riding flips at all, it'll probably flip to the PCs. The Liberals got just 12% of votes in the riding in 2018, compared to 51.2% for the NDP and 28.7% for the PCs.
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  #54  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2022, 5:00 PM
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I don't know. With Miller running as an independent things are really up in the air. The Liberal vote across the province was fairly depressed during the last election. It's represented federally by the Liberals too. Farr has a lot more name recognition than Butt. Lumsden could win, but I would bet on Farr over Lumsden.
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  #55  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2022, 5:34 PM
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Given current province-wide polling numbers, I just don't see it for the OLP. I mean the writ hasn't even dropped yet so there is still plenty of room for movement, but for Farr to win, the NDP would have to tank in support with almost all lost votes bleeding to the OLP, the OLP would have to increase in popularity over their current polling numbers, taking many from the PCs, and Miller would have to splinter the NDP vote.

Just not sure I really see that happening.

I live in the riding, so I'm quite interested in it, but it's a pretty safe NDP seat. Something pretty crazy would have to happen for them to lose it, and if they did, something else pretty crazy would have to happen for the OLP to be the party waiting to take it from them.
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  #56  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2022, 10:59 PM
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I think Miller could well splinter the vote. There's a lot of old time steelworkers in the riding.
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  #57  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2022, 2:12 PM
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I see it as a Win-win-win for everybody.

If Farr wins, he gets a better paying cushy job. If he loses, he gets more name recognition, something that I think will be important in the next council election since Cameron is gaining traction, and people have become tired of Farr's antics. Not to mention the large population shift that has occurred in Ward 2 most of which won't have Farr in mind already if they go to the polls.

If Farr wins, the liberals get a quiet backbencher who won in part on his name recognition in Hamilton. If he loses, they won't miss anything of too much value.

It's a match made in the liberal heaven.
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  #58  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2022, 5:33 PM
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Not too sure how safe that seat is for the NDP, and do think that Miller will be a factor in spoiling the ground held by the NDP. Should be close for the Liberals to sneak in.
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  #59  
Old Posted Jun 13, 2022, 5:21 PM
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Keanin Loomis launches mayoral campaign, promising that ‘change is on the way’ for Hamilton
Loomis resigned from the helm of the Hamilton Chamber of Commerce back in March in order to run for mayor.


By Fallon Hewitt
The Hamilton Spectator
Sun., June 12, 2022

https://12ft.io/proxy?q=https%3A%2F%...-hamilton.html



Video Link



...

Loomis’ plan focuses on four areas, including improved government transparency, community-focused growth, a more responsive municipality and creating a clean and safe city.

“Hamilton is evolving and city hall needs to evolve with it,” said Loomis. “We have to optimize the opportunity we have in this moment in our city’s history in a way that benefits everyone.”

Loomis reiterated that he was inspired to run for mayor following the Red Hill Valley Parkway friction scandal, the violence at Hamilton Pride and Sewergate.

“I just could not remain silent any further,” he said, while also pointing to the culture around the city hall horseshoe. “What I see does not inspire me with confidence nor does it instil me with pride.”

Loomis said as a father of three, one of his greatest concerns in Hamilton is the safety of the city’s streets, which have claimed the lives of nine pedestrians this year alone.

Speaking to reporters at the event, Loomis said under his leadership, the city would “actually implement” its Vision Zero mandate, as opposed to “just paying lip service to it.”

He pointed to a need to create a dialogue with drivers and improve the design of roadways and bike lanes throughout the city.

Loomis has also pledged to “repair relationships” with marginalized communities within the city.

“It’s about forming those relationships over the course of this process,” he said, claiming the work has already begun in preparation for November. “There will already be that basis of trust.”

...
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  #60  
Old Posted Jun 13, 2022, 8:21 PM
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Other than his stance for pro-urban boundary expansion, he would be a nice change. If Fred runs too, they'll probably be competing for similar demographics which worries me if old man Bratina sneaks in again. So hope that does not happen or this city can peel back the progress.
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