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  #101  
Old Posted Today, 1:01 AM
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Double L Double L is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nouvellecosse View Post
It's often true that the majority of people didn't vote for the person elected. Happens all the time here. But that tends to be a more convincing argument when it's due to vote splitting in places with more than two main options. Like if the winner got 40% and the other candidates or parties got say, 35% and 25% then 60% voted for someone else. But when most people didn't vote for the winner because most people didn't vote...

Like, why didn't you vote guys? Most people may not have voted for the winner, but they also chose not to vote against them which is still a choice.
Texas has a runoff system in its elections.
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  #102  
Old Posted Today, 1:43 AM
wwmiv wwmiv is offline
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Originally Posted by Double L View Post
Texas has a runoff system in its elections.
Texas has a majoritarian system for primaries and a plurality system for general elections. Ergo, run-offs only happen for primary nominations and not between partisan nominees to fill the actual office itself in the general election—to win the general you just need one more vote than your next closest opponent.

Only these states meaningfully require run-off elections:

• California, where the general election is a de facto run-off after an all-party primary.
• Washington, where the general election is a de facto run-off after an all-party primary.
• Louisiana, where there are run-off elections for federal offices after the general election when no candidate receives a true majority and where state offices feature an all party primary and a run-off general election a la California.
• Georgia, where there are run-off elections after the general election when no candidate receives a true majority for only some offices.
• Mississippi, where the state legislature decides the candidate in a pseudo runoff in absence of a majority and this only applies to the office of Governor.
• Vermont, where the state legislature decides the candidate in a pseudo runoff absence of a majority for all state level officials elected on a statewide ballot.
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Houston: 2314k (+0%) + MSA suburbs: 5196k (+7%) + CSA exurbs: 196k (+3%)
Dallas: 1303k (-0%) + MSA div. suburbs: 4160k (9%) + adj. CSA exurbs: 457k (+6%)
Ft. Worth: 978k (+6%) + MSA div. suburbs: 1659k (+4%) + adj. CSA exurbs: 98k (+8%)
San Antonio: 1495k (+4%) + MSA suburbs: 1209k (+8%) + CSA exurbs: 82k (+3%)
Austin: 980k (+2%) + MSA suburbs: 1493k (+13%)
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  #103  
Old Posted Today, 1:50 AM
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bilbao58 bilbao58 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wwmiv View Post
Texas has a majoritarian system for primaries and a plurality system for general elections. Ergo, run-offs only happen for primary nominations and not between partisan nominees to fill the actual office itself in the general election—to win the general you just need one more vote than your next closest opponent.
Runoffs are used in local (supposedly) nonpartisan elections, at least in Houston. If no one wins a clear majority in the first round, the top two winners will meet in a runoff. Thus the two candidates in the last election for Houston mayor were Democrats Sheila Jackson Lee and John Whitmire.
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  #104  
Old Posted Today, 1:51 AM
wwmiv wwmiv is offline
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Originally Posted by bilbao58 View Post
Runoffs are used in local (supposedly) nonpartisan elections, at least in Houston. If no one wins a clear majority in the first round, the top two winners will meet in a runoff.
Those are local choices and state law has nothing to say on it. Ergo it is still accurate to say “Texas does not have run-offs for general elections.” if you also understand that some municipalities therein may make different choices for their own affairs. E.G. “Texas does not have run-offs, but Houston sure does.”
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Houston: 2314k (+0%) + MSA suburbs: 5196k (+7%) + CSA exurbs: 196k (+3%)
Dallas: 1303k (-0%) + MSA div. suburbs: 4160k (9%) + adj. CSA exurbs: 457k (+6%)
Ft. Worth: 978k (+6%) + MSA div. suburbs: 1659k (+4%) + adj. CSA exurbs: 98k (+8%)
San Antonio: 1495k (+4%) + MSA suburbs: 1209k (+8%) + CSA exurbs: 82k (+3%)
Austin: 980k (+2%) + MSA suburbs: 1493k (+13%)
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  #105  
Old Posted Today, 1:55 AM
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bilbao58 bilbao58 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wwmiv View Post
Those are local choices and state law has nothing to say on it.
I know. I'm just thinking Double L may have been thinking of that since he or she is from Houston and the election is fresh in people's minds.
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  #106  
Old Posted Today, 1:57 AM
wwmiv wwmiv is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bilbao58 View Post
Runoffs are used in local (supposedly) nonpartisan elections, at least in Houston. If no one wins a clear majority in the first round, the top two winners will meet in a runoff. Thus the two candidates in the last election for Houston mayor were Democrats Sheila Jackson Lee and John Whitmire.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bilbao58 View Post
I know. I'm just thinking Double L may have been thinking of that since he or she is from Houston and the election is fresh in people's minds.
Ah. Understood.
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Houston: 2314k (+0%) + MSA suburbs: 5196k (+7%) + CSA exurbs: 196k (+3%)
Dallas: 1303k (-0%) + MSA div. suburbs: 4160k (9%) + adj. CSA exurbs: 457k (+6%)
Ft. Worth: 978k (+6%) + MSA div. suburbs: 1659k (+4%) + adj. CSA exurbs: 98k (+8%)
San Antonio: 1495k (+4%) + MSA suburbs: 1209k (+8%) + CSA exurbs: 82k (+3%)
Austin: 980k (+2%) + MSA suburbs: 1493k (+13%)
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  #107  
Old Posted Today, 1:57 AM
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bilbao58 bilbao58 is offline
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And, of course, if turnout is minuscule, the majority of eligible voters still didn't vote for the winner. Runoff or majoritarian or whatever..
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  #108  
Old Posted Today, 1:59 AM
wwmiv wwmiv is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bilbao58 View Post
And, of course, if turnout is minuscule, the majority of eligible voters still didn't vote for the winner. Runoff or majoritarian or whatever..
Fun Fact: Florida requires that the number of votes cast for any state constitutional amendment be a majority of those registered (rather than of votes cast) in order to win.
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Houston: 2314k (+0%) + MSA suburbs: 5196k (+7%) + CSA exurbs: 196k (+3%)
Dallas: 1303k (-0%) + MSA div. suburbs: 4160k (9%) + adj. CSA exurbs: 457k (+6%)
Ft. Worth: 978k (+6%) + MSA div. suburbs: 1659k (+4%) + adj. CSA exurbs: 98k (+8%)
San Antonio: 1495k (+4%) + MSA suburbs: 1209k (+8%) + CSA exurbs: 82k (+3%)
Austin: 980k (+2%) + MSA suburbs: 1493k (+13%)
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  #109  
Old Posted Today, 4:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wwmiv View Post
Fun Fact: Florida requires that the number of votes cast for any state constitutional amendment be a majority of those registered (rather than of votes cast) in order to win.
Whew, now that's tough.
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  #110  
Old Posted Today, 5:11 PM
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Nouvellecosse Nouvellecosse is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Double L View Post
Texas has a runoff system in its elections.
I don't understand runoff systems well enough to know how that explains there only being a 45% voter turnout.
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  #111  
Old Posted Today, 5:22 PM
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bilbao58 bilbao58 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nouvellecosse View Post
I don't understand runoff systems well enough to know how that explains there only being a 45% voter turnout.
It doesn't. And statewide, runoffs are only for party primary elections, the elections which determine who will be each party's nominee in the general election.

In local elections with more than two candidates, runoffs are used if no candidate wins a clear majority of the votes. The top two will face off in the runoff. None of this affects, or is affected by, low voter turnout. Primaries have notoriously low turnout... some years in single digit percentages.
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