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  #421  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2021, 4:57 AM
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the crane removal is pretty strange . they have a big yellow one on site - has been there for a few years, maybe they will put that to use. What was the outcome on the boost in height proposal that happened?
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  #422  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2021, 10:02 PM
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I believe the blue one he rents and the yellow one is one of 2 he bought. Costing him money while he waits for the city makes a decision.
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  #423  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2021, 6:02 PM
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  #424  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2021, 3:18 AM
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so has the site gone silent now, how long does Vrancor have to wait?
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  #425  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2021, 11:35 AM
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Until he gets his zoning, and clears any conditions.

It hasn’t even gone to council yet. Once it does, it’s typically a month or two after to clear any conditions there may be, then the bylaw has to be registered, then a permit can be issued. Provided he has Site Plan approval as well.

If this goes to the next planning committee meeting, it could be a few months. The longer it takes for that to happen, the longer the site will sit.
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  #426  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2021, 9:01 PM
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Serious question are buildings in our area built to any sort of earthquake code? I remember learning in school that there are some fault lines that run from Toronto to Niagara under Lake Ontario that had the potential to create a major earthquake one day (even though they are rare here).

Looking at this building I would not even want to be in it during a very minor earthquake. That looks like a lego brick kind of construction!? Is this like the cheapest form of construction?



No thanks...
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Last edited by StEC; Mar 26, 2021 at 9:32 PM.
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  #427  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2021, 9:20 PM
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Yes, Section 4.1.8 of the NBCC outlines all requirements for structural loads as they relate to earthquakes.

Canada has one of the most comprehensive building codes in the world.
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  #428  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2021, 10:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Innsertnamehere View Post
If this goes to the next planning committee meeting, it could be a few months. The longer it takes for that to happen, the longer the site will sit.
Not sure this was posted here already, but the project has been split into 2 separate applications (see below from GSP website ). Phase 1 goes before planning committee April 20.

Project Update

(February 2021)

A request was submitted to the City to consider the proposed development in 2 phases: Phase 1 (the hotel) and Phase 2 (the apartment).

Phase 1 (Hotel) Drawings and Renderings
Phase 2 (Apartment) Drawings and Renderings

Last edited by Bubba9000; Mar 26, 2021 at 11:02 PM.
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  #429  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2021, 11:14 PM
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Now seeing the renders again, it reminded me how much I hate this development. It's so ugly and mishmashy, has a large surface lot between the building. And worse still is the grass between the sidewalk and the building like this building exists in Burlington or something. Was the plan to get rid of the grass when LRT was built?
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  #430  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2021, 11:39 PM
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That rounded corner is required for the LRT I believe, though I can’t remember why.
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  #431  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2021, 11:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StEC View Post
Serious question are buildings in our area built to any sort of earthquake code? I remember learning in school that there are some fault lines that run from Toronto to Niagara under Lake Ontario that had the potential to create a major earthquake one day (even though they are rare here).

Looking at this building I would not even want to be in it during a very minor earthquake. That looks like a lego brick kind of construction!? Is this like the cheapest form of construction?
Armchair engineer here (actually my chair has no arms, so my qualifications are even less impressive) I'd probably be more worried about buildings that are completely cast concrete structures. The "lego" ones should be designed to have a bit of give, any motion would be transferred along the seams in the structure rather than causing cracks.

That said, I'm sure the cast structures account for this stuff too. And our quakes tend to be very short sharp occurrences of relatively low magnitudes, unlike the continuous shaking that happens along the kinds of fault lines on the west coast or in Asia which have caused collapses of buildings, elevated freeways, sections of bridges, etc.
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  #432  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2021, 3:28 AM
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Originally Posted by ScreamingViking View Post
Armchair engineer here (actually my chair has no arms, so my qualifications are even less impressive) I'd probably be more worried about buildings that are completely cast concrete structures. The "lego" ones should be designed to have a bit of give, any motion would be transferred along the seams in the structure rather than causing cracks.

That said, I'm sure the cast structures account for this stuff too. And our quakes tend to be very short sharp occurrences of relatively low magnitudes, unlike the continuous shaking that happens along the kinds of fault lines on the west coast or in Asia which have caused collapses of buildings, elevated freeways, sections of bridges, etc.
Like I mentioned, any structure built in Canada must be designed for the seismic loads outlined in section 4.1.8 of the NBCC.

They don't build these structures willy nilly, they go through an extensive design process that is calculated and precise. You simply can't build a structure like this if it doesn't adhere to the National Building Code of Canada.
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  #433  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2021, 4:22 AM
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That rounded corner is required for the LRT I believe, though I can’t remember why.
The City requires ample space at that corner of the intersection for a potential slip lane, should they need to build one.

A slip lane.

Downtown.
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  #434  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2021, 4:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShavedParmesanCheese View Post
The City requires ample space at that corner of the intersection for a potential slip lane, should they need to build one.

A slip lane.

Downtown.
This city man. It builds it's downtown like it's a suburb... I remember they had a similar situation with the developments on John where the setback was designed to expand John to 3 lanes like they thought the entire downtown would be taxed at some point... What were they thinking...
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  #435  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2021, 12:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheHonestMaple View Post
Like I mentioned, any structure built in Canada must be designed for the seismic loads outlined in section 4.1.8 of the NBCC.

They don't build these structures willy nilly, they go through an extensive design process that is calculated and precise. You simply can't build a structure like this if it doesn't adhere to the National Building Code of Canada.
Yes. And there are professionals who could lose their careers by designing something that isn't more than safe.

That said, there have been instances where corners have been cut. It happens far, far, FAR less in Canada than some other countries, but it has occurred.
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  #436  
Old Posted Mar 29, 2021, 11:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheHonestMaple View Post
Yes, Section 4.1.8 of the NBCC outlines all requirements for structural loads as they relate to earthquakes.

Canada has one of the most comprehensive building codes in the world.
Good to know, thank you.

Edit: Looking at that photo though still doesn't inspire a lot of confidence. I'll just avoid that hotel lol.
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  #437  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2021, 3:59 PM
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  #438  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2021, 5:21 PM
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good to see. So zoning approval from Council in early May most likely - hopefully they can finish off the hotel sooner rather than later.
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