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  #4481  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2020, 2:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Calgarian View Post
Great shot, definitely a big city feel here.

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Lol, was just looking for this thread to post near the bottom of the page, but with someone123 just posting it was at the top. Nice pic, not usually a fan of black and white, but on cloudy days it can work quite well. Then new buildings in Halifax are adding some nice visual diversity and layers.

Here's one (of Victoria) from Flickr taken with a telephoto lens, for some reason the horizontal is skewed and compressed:

Victoria BC January 1, 2020 by Lindsay Mac, on Flickr
At the right horizontal compression ratio, any city can look Manhattanized


https://rehabexpert.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Saskatoon-Drug-Rehab-e1393211017430.jpg
Saskatoon
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  #4482  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2020, 2:14 AM
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At the right horizontal compression ratio, any city can look Manhattanized
Not true!

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  #4483  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2020, 1:51 AM
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  #4484  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2020, 9:35 PM
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A quick shot of London i took today, the new building on Richmond certainly fills in well where a big space would be
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  #4485  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2020, 1:42 AM
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The full pano of Quebec I took earlier today, at bassin Louise

Sorry for the width, you will have to scroll ---->

Last edited by Masoliantekw; Mar 2, 2020 at 2:07 AM.
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  #4486  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2020, 2:43 AM
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The full pano of Quebec I took earlier today, at bassin Louise

Sorry for the width....
Nothing wrong with a good panorama!
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  #4487  
Old Posted May 11, 2020, 9:14 PM
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Yellowknife looks cool, for a cold town. Halifax is becoming a metropolis; must be enjoying an influx of folks from somewhere else to have such growth. Yeah, that's Canada.

Last edited by Ricopedra; May 11, 2020 at 9:32 PM.
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  #4488  
Old Posted May 12, 2020, 5:52 PM
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Halifax is becoming a metropolis; must be enjoying an influx of folks from somewhere else to have such growth.
Sort of. Immigration to Nova Scotia has increased somewhat in recent years but I think a bigger factor overall is that fewer people are leaving - anecdotally, it seems less common now for working-age people to move to Alberta (the job market is no longer as attractive) or Toronto (where it's difficult to find housing). A good proportion (probably 50% or more) of the post-secondary students in Halifax are from outside NS and they seem more likely to stay long-term than even 10 years ago. Part of this is that property is still considered "a good deal" here relative to most comparable parts of Canada (although I doubt this will be true 10 years from now).

Another factor is that a large proportion of development in the Halifax area is infill in the urban core/downtown, so this is captured easily in photos. Compared to most Canadian urban areas (and even 90s Halifax) there isn't very much "greenfield" development here. Part of this comes down to policy and economics and part of it is that most of our "fields" are steep ridges covered in dense forest.
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  #4489  
Old Posted May 12, 2020, 6:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Hali87 View Post
Sort of. Immigration to Nova Scotia has increased somewhat in recent years but I think a bigger factor overall is that fewer people are leaving - anecdotally, it seems less common now for working-age people to move to Alberta (the job market is no longer as attractive) or Toronto (where it's difficult to find housing). A good proportion (probably 50% or more) of the post-secondary students in Halifax are from outside NS and they seem more likely to stay long-term than even 10 years ago. Part of this is that property is still considered "a good deal" here relative to most comparable parts of Canada (although I doubt this will be true 10 years from now).
Don't have the data on hand right now but demographically it's mostly immigration. If I remember correctly internal migration is positive but small (maybe 1-2k a year), and births vs. deaths are pretty low too, while immigration is probably 5-6k. Last year, Halifax was one of the fastest growing cities in Canada, and I would imagine it stands hugely outside of the pack of Northeastern US cities that are sort of comparable (Portland, Providence, etc.).

NS used to have a very low provincial immigration cap not might higher than PEI. The raising of the cap was a major change for the province.

Quote:
Another factor is that a large proportion of development in the Halifax area is infill in the urban core/downtown, so this is captured easily in photos. Compared to most Canadian urban areas (and even 90s Halifax) there isn't very much "greenfield" development here. Part of this comes down to policy and economics and part of it is that most of our "fields" are steep ridges covered in dense forest.
I have read that 50% of the value of construction in the metro area is on the peninsula, but I don't have a good source for that either.

Halifax is such a strange metro area. It has a lot of exurbs but also a lot of large multi-unit residential buildings for its size. If you are going to live in one of those multi-unit buildings, I think it makes more sense to be in an urban neighbourhood than a suburb. Halifax is also relatively old with a more expansive than usual urban core that is suitable for infill. It might soon end up with an urban core with 150,000-200,000 residents (I don't mean urban area but rather walkable "inner city"), something you don't see much in smaller North American metros.

The Halifax model of a strong core and then quasi-rural suburbs actually makes a lot of sense in a smaller city. I think people in big cities would choose that option too but there's not enough land for exurbs within a good commuting distance of downtown. Halifax has a combination of desirable inner-city locations and plentiful, dirt cheap suburban land.
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  #4490  
Old Posted May 26, 2020, 3:18 PM
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SK's new tallest starting to pop up from this perspective - behind and to the right of the Bessborough:



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  #4491  
Old Posted May 27, 2020, 5:04 PM
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  #4492  
Old Posted May 27, 2020, 7:23 PM
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Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
Don't have the data on hand right now but demographically it's mostly immigration. If I remember correctly internal migration is positive but small (maybe 1-2k a year), and births vs. deaths are pretty low too, while immigration is probably 5-6k. Last year, Halifax was one of the fastest growing cities in Canada, and I would imagine it stands hugely outside of the pack of Northeastern US cities that are sort of comparable (Portland, Providence, etc.).

NS used to have a very low provincial immigration cap not might higher than PEI. The raising of the cap was a major change for the province.



I have read that 50% of the value of construction in the metro area is on the peninsula, but I don't have a good source for that either.

Halifax is such a strange metro area. It has a lot of exurbs but also a lot of large multi-unit residential buildings for its size. If you are going to live in one of those multi-unit buildings, I think it makes more sense to be in an urban neighbourhood than a suburb. Halifax is also relatively old with a more expansive than usual urban core that is suitable for infill. It might soon end up with an urban core with 150,000-200,000 residents (I don't mean urban area but rather walkable "inner city"), something you don't see much in smaller North American metros.

The Halifax model of a strong core and then quasi-rural suburbs actually makes a lot of sense in a smaller city. I think people in big cities would choose that option too but there's not enough land for exurbs within a good commuting distance of downtown. Halifax has a combination of desirable inner-city locations and plentiful, dirt cheap suburban land.
The geography of Halifax is really restrictive too so infill is really the only option at this point. Halifax is both really dense (for its pop) but also incredibly sprawled too which is a weird combination. If LRT/Fast Ferry/Streetcars could get planned and built faster the metro could sustainably grow to the 600,000-650,000 range if a metrolink system could connect the mainland areas, Bedford, Dartmouth/Cole Harbour and so on with increased infill in those outer centres.
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  #4493  
Old Posted May 28, 2020, 8:53 PM
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some nice shots of Kelowna that were posted in the Kelowna construction thread - https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/sho...28437&page=135


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^ Quite the difference from last August.

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Very nice progress on Clement Ave projects and Brooklyn!
One Water East tower will top off in a month and I also drove through the area today and it looks like the 4 laning of clement could be done by the end of summer.

Here's a shot from this past weekend:
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  #4494  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2020, 4:11 PM
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Rimouski
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  #4495  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2020, 6:28 PM
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What's the lego cube building on the far right?
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  #4496  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2020, 9:09 PM
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What's the lego cube building on the far right?
Ugly.
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  #4497  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2020, 9:20 PM
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What's the lego cube building on the far right?
This is the recent reclad of the CHRR's west wing (l'Hôpital régional de Rimouski). I thought it was ... hmm original.

We have this guy now UC and will be next to the leftmost building, Le C Hôtel Le Navigateur. Beside it, La Grande Place is living its last days to be redeveloped.
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  #4498  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2020, 3:19 AM
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I need some London lovin.
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  #4499  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2020, 6:14 AM
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Halifax, September 2019:


Source
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  #4500  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2020, 2:23 PM
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That looks really cool. All the highrises give an impression of density.
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