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  #1521  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2020, 6:46 PM
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NC gets federal grant to buy corridor for Raleigh-Richmond high-speed rail

https://www.newsobserver.com/news/lo...245841010.html

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- The effort to establish high-speed passenger rail service between Raleigh and Richmond, Virginia, got a boost Friday with a $47.5 million federal grant to the N.C. Department of Transportation. The money will allow the state to buy a rail line between Raleigh and Ridgeway, near the Virginia state line, from freight railroad CSX. The grant was announced late Friday by Democratic Reps. David Price and G.K. Butterfield and both of North Carolina’s Republican U.S. senators, Richard Burr and Thom Tillis. North Carolina and Virginia have been planning for high-speed passenger trains through the two states since 1992 and have long coveted access to CSX’s so-called S-line between Raleigh and Petersburg.

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  #1522  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2020, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by M II A II R II K View Post
NC gets federal grant to buy corridor for Raleigh-Richmond high-speed rail.
https://www.newsobserver.com/news/lo...245841010.html
A sentence contained within the news report,
"The state’s long-term plans for rail service include passenger trains capable of going 110 mph between Raleigh and Richmond on the S-line."

Again, we see 110 mph maximum speeds being reported as high speed rail.
America's definition for HSR is lower than what most of the world defines.
The metric world defines HSR as 200 kph (125 mph) on preexisting railroad corridors, and 250 kph (150 mph) on brand new alignments.
America's 110 mph for HSR is lacking.
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  #1523  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2020, 1:45 PM
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  #1524  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2020, 8:15 PM
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Texas Central Railroad received a positive Record Of Decision and approval from the FRA for the Japanese alternate control systems today. This means they can start building the Dallas to Houston HSR project once they have raised the money to pay for it.

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  #1525  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2020, 9:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by electricron View Post
A sentence contained within the news report,
"The state’s long-term plans for rail service include passenger trains capable of going 110 mph between Raleigh and Richmond on the S-line."

Again, we see 110 mph maximum speeds being reported as high speed rail.
America's definition for HSR is lower than what most of the world defines.
The metric world defines HSR as 200 kph (125 mph) on preexisting railroad corridors, and 250 kph (150 mph) on brand new alignments.
America's 110 mph for HSR is lacking.
I'm guessing there are high regulatory requirements that kick in between Class 6 (110mph) and Class 7 (125mph) which is why we have seen few states choose this route. I don't know all the particulars of FRA regulations but it looks like Class 7 requires more frequent inspections and a much more complicated system at grade crossings.

Given how badly grade crossings screwed up Denver's new commuter system, this might be the reason states are hesitant to do 125mph, or part of the reason. (Granted, part of Denver's issue involved electrification, which would not be in place on the S-Line).

At least the new Charger locos are theoretically capable of regular service at 125mph, although there are no tracks on which they can go that fast.
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  #1526  
Old Posted Sep 22, 2020, 1:11 AM
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Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
I'm guessing there are high regulatory requirements that kick in between Class 6 (110mph) and Class 7 (125mph) which is why we have seen few states choose this route. I don't know all the particulars of FRA regulations but it looks like Class 7 requires more frequent inspections and a much more complicated system at grade crossings.

Given how badly grade crossings screwed up Denver's new commuter system, this might be the reason states are hesitant to do 125mph, or part of the reason. (Granted, part of Denver's issue involved electrification, which would not be in place on the S-Line).

At least the new Charger locos are theoretically capable of regular service at 125mph, although there are no tracks on which they can go that fast.
You are on to something there why 110 mph is so popular proposal as the highest speeds on existing railroad corridors in the USA. One of the key requirements is full isolation, quad gates at all public and private at grade crossings for speeds faster than 110 mph. Most of these existing rail corridors proponents wish to upgrade are in rural areas where every farm and ranch has its own private crossing or two. Few farmers or ranchers can afford a half million dollars to instal quad gates for their private crossings, therefore few government agencies propose it.
Never-the-less, 110 mph maximum speeds is not considered HSR in the rest of the world.
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  #1527  
Old Posted Sep 24, 2020, 7:59 AM
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Amtrak Alstom Avelia Liberty (New Acela 21) Night Testing On The Northeast Corridor (9/23-9/24 2020)

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