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  #941  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2020, 1:20 AM
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They just shrunk each shape and that eastern chunk was separated by water, with the St. Lawrence meeting the US border at one point. They should have shrunk all of the parts of Canada as a whole.

It shows how much our borders favour the US. The Lower Mainland's population is probably 90% Canadian but they got a chunk of it. The St. Lawrence River is similar but then the US got one little southern bank. There's practically nothing in Northern Maine and it would have been useful to Canada for travel purposes but the US got it.

Similarly they have a weird protrusion running halfway down what should be Canada's Pacific coast. No doubt a part of the Alaska Purchase but had the situation been reversed I doubt the US would have tolerated a border like that.

Part of the issue is that Canada wasn't even much of a coherent country until the late 1800's. So people in the eastern populated half of Canada did not care about the Alaska Purchase and even the Maritimes didn't care so much about Northern Maine (with land connections to Quebec and Ontario being far down the list of priorities). Meanwhile the US was campaigning for a large cohesive territory even in the early 1800's. On top of that Canada was under British control so even when it did conquer territories (this happened to part of Maine) due to local/regional initiatives they'd often just get traded back after in exchange for something somewhere else in the empire. That trading is part of what drove the American colonies to revolt against Britain.
And never mind what the fuck Point Roberts is all about. They had to draw a straight line through that spit of land but then hung a left before hitting Vancouver Island? Maybe we should make a trade for Campobello Island NB or something lol
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  #942  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2020, 1:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Djeffery View Post
And never mind what the fuck Point Roberts is all about. They had to draw a straight line through that spit of land but then hung a left before hitting Vancouver Island? Maybe we should make a trade for Campobello Island NB or something lol
No!! I like Campobello!!!

If there were a year round ferry from Canada, it would be an interesting place to have a retirement property on............
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  #943  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2020, 2:11 AM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
No!! I like Campobello!!!

If there were a year round ferry from Canada, it would be an interesting place to have a retirement property on............
I thought if anyone picked up on that comment, it would be you lol. I suggested that to my NB aunt who almost disowned me for saying it lol.
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  #944  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2020, 11:49 PM
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Population distribution map for North America, 2016.

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  #945  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2020, 12:57 AM
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^ you know there's work to do when Anchorage looks as big as many canuck cities.
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  #946  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2020, 1:00 AM
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Anchorage IS as large as many canuck cities.
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  #947  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2020, 3:27 AM
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Anchorage's metropolitan area has about 400,000 people, but it's also quite sprawling. Similarly, Duluth only has 20,000 more people in its metropolitan area than Thunder Bay but appears nearly twice the size, because it covers considerably more ground.
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  #948  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2020, 5:02 AM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
Population distribution map for North America, 2016.
So cool.
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  #949  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2020, 5:20 AM
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Same as how Detroit looks a bit bigger than Toronto on satellite maps but has a smaller population.

It's interesting how the Prairies are a bit more developed in Canada, with Alberta in particular having nothing really comparable south of the border. Winnipeg is I guess the northern version of Minneapolis but they don't really have a Saskatoon or Regina either. Part of what's going on there is oil and maybe another part is the aridity of the plains that are farther south (which includes part of southern AB and SK).

The Maritimes are the opposite, being a lot less developed than New England. One common line of reasoning is that the Maritimes don't have a lot of farmland like say Ontario but I think they have about as much as New England which has a lot more people, even if you subtract out the Boston area (PEI has about 1.5x the farmland of Massachusetts). The same type of land or resources tend to be much more developed on the US side of the border in that region even when somewhat far away from a major city.
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  #950  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2020, 5:37 AM
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It's interesting how the population "dots" are so evenly spaced as if on a grid in the central US, but less so in Canada. I wonder if that is truly representative or just a limitation of the mapping process.
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  #951  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2020, 5:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Metro-One View Post
Oh fuck all this noise over the Mercator projection.

This is the one field where I can say I really know what I am talking about. (SFU GIS graduate)

There is no great conspiracy to make Africa looks small / racial conspiracy etc...

Simple fact is the Earth is geoid. It is impossible to represent a 3D object on a 2D image without distortion.

Now, there are many projection, as demonstrated above, but every projection must distort one (or two) of the following: direction, shape, scale.

The Mercator projection has been preferred because it retains direction and to an extent shape. This is by far the most important for most industries. Try navigating the seas with a map that distorts direction, especially prior to GPS.

That’s it, that’s why it is such a common map.

Tired of this fucking conspiracy argument.
It does look like there is a deliberate magnification of the Northern hemisphere. My guess is to make European nations more visible.
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  #952  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2020, 11:51 AM
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Even in 2020, after more than a century of westward expansion the population of the U.S. is a lot more concentrated east of the Mississippi (very roughly, or just a bit to the west of it) than most people would expect.

And I know California is the most populous state. So it just goes to show how concentrated the west coast population really is.
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  #953  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2020, 12:00 PM
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I've always been fascinated by how empty northern Maine is, and have always wondered how much of this is due to the placement of the international border. On the Quebec side, for example, there is a pretty tidy arrangement of small villages that run right up to the border and then stop, bam, right at the frontier. If the border did not exist, would this arrangement of villages have continued on into northern Maine, at least a little bit further???

There certainly would have been another transportation corridor in this area, extending roughly from Fredericton/Woodstock through to Sherbrooke. This would have also helped stimulate population growth in this area.
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  #954  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2020, 7:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
Same as how Detroit looks a bit bigger than Toronto on satellite maps but has a smaller population.

It's interesting how the Prairies are a bit more developed in Canada, with Alberta in particular having nothing really comparable south of the border. Winnipeg is I guess the northern version of Minneapolis but they don't really have a Saskatoon or Regina either. Part of what's going on there is oil and maybe another part is the aridity of the plains that are farther south (which includes part of southern AB and SK).

The Maritimes are the opposite, being a lot less developed than New England. One common line of reasoning is that the Maritimes don't have a lot of farmland like say Ontario but I think they have about as much as New England which has a lot more people, even if you subtract out the Boston area (PEI has about 1.5x the farmland of Massachusetts). The same type of land or resources tend to be much more developed on the US side of the border in that region even when somewhat far away from a major city.
Well there is Denver & SLC (as comparable to Calgary at least).
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  #955  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2020, 7:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
Same as how Detroit looks a bit bigger than Toronto on satellite maps but has a smaller population.

It's interesting how the Prairies are a bit more developed in Canada, with Alberta in particular having nothing really comparable south of the border. Winnipeg is I guess the northern version of Minneapolis but they don't really have a Saskatoon or Regina either. Part of what's going on there is oil and maybe another part is the aridity of the plains that are farther south (which includes part of southern AB and SK).
Yes, the Palliser triangle has rangeland rather than farms, very few people, very many cattle. South of there U.S. agricultural policy has meant that the land is a lot more irrigated and more intensively farmed (if you look at Google Earth the border between Canada and the US is very obvious, since the farm fields abruptly stop at the 49th parallel). But there still aren't a lot of large towns.
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  #956  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2020, 7:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vid View Post
Anchorage's metropolitan area has about 400,000 people, but it's also quite sprawling. Similarly, Duluth only has 20,000 more people in its metropolitan area than Thunder Bay but appears nearly twice the size, because it covers considerably more ground.
Even Minneapolis and Seattle look twice the size of Toronto but are only around half the metro population.

In regard to the Great Plains vs. Prairie population dispersion, the rockies in the US bulge out much farther east. Denver is at the same longitude as Moose Jaw, which is about 750 - 800 km from Calgary and the Canadian Front Ranges.
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  #957  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2020, 4:49 PM
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A full half of Canada’s population lives here:

This region covers an area of roughly 50,000 square miles (about the same size as Pennsylvania), and all of it is located south of the Washington-Oregon border.





http://metrocosm.com/canada-population-map/
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  #958  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2020, 5:50 PM
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My go to is that:

1/3rd of Canadians live north of the 49th parallel (the west)
1/3rd of Canadians live between the 45th & 49th parallels (mid latitude eastern Canada)
1/3rd of Canadians live south of the 45th parallel (southern Ontario & southern NS)
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