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  #281  
Old Posted May 3, 2020, 1:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Restless One View Post
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Originally Posted by JACKinBeantown View Post
Serious question: When construction workers all have to use the same portable toilets in a small enclosed space, how is that safe with a highly contagious airborne virus?


So, everything just stops? For how long? What is your criteria for getting back to work?

This is the first time ever the healthy were quarantined and not the sick and vulnerable.

30+ million jobs lost, and you still think "stay at home" orders are just fine???

ETA: You can't take inventory from home, you can't load/unload trucks from home. You can't build needed/wanted commodities from home. At some point, you have to have actually see your inventory. You have to actually operate a forklift to load/unload inventory. You have to physically run CNC machines, glue parts, engage nuts and bolts on an industrial scale. The people that can't work from home want to earn their paychecks and pay their bills too.
I was hoping for an answer, not a rant.

Does anyone actually have an answer? (If so, thanks because I'd like to learn from your knowledge. If not, please have a nice day.)
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  #282  
Old Posted May 4, 2020, 8:49 PM
Restless One Restless One is offline
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Originally Posted by JACKinBeantown View Post
I was hoping for an answer, not a rant.

Does anyone actually have an answer? (If so, thanks because I'd like to learn from your knowledge. If not, please have a nice day.)
Next time, just admit you got nothin.

As for you answer, the heat and humidity in a port a potty alone will kill the virus airborn, or on surfaces, in a matter of minutes, so increase the number of pottys on site, and try to leave at least 10 minutes between uses.

https://nationalinterest.org/blog/bu...navirus-147806

Maybe in the future, PoP's will have frosted glass ceilings to allow solar light in as well.

Of course, the real answer is, nothing will be 100% safe until their is a vaccine, and herd immunity, which doesn't happen by locking up the healthy and not as vulnerable. More antibody tests will tell us more.
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  #283  
Old Posted May 5, 2020, 3:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Restless One View Post
Next time, just admit you got nothin.
Um... that's why I asked the question, which you then answered. Thank you for the answer you provided. It was well thought out and informative:

Quote:
As for you answer, the heat and humidity in a port a potty alone will kill the virus airborn, or on surfaces, in a matter of minutes, so increase the number of pottys on site, and try to leave at least 10 minutes between uses.

https://nationalinterest.org/blog/bu...navirus-147806

Maybe in the future, PoP's will have frosted glass ceilings to allow solar light in as well.

Of course, the real answer is, nothing will be 100% safe until their is a vaccine, and herd immunity, which doesn't happen by locking up the healthy and not as vulnerable. More antibody tests will tell us more.
To that last part, in addition to a vaccine and herd immunity I'd add sufficient testing.
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  #284  
Old Posted Sep 9, 2020, 3:52 PM
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I don't even understand. Is this completed?

It looks like they wrapped the buildings in painter's tape and forgot to take it off.
When this project was first announced there was hope that it would be taller. Without getting on the bad side of the skyscraper forum gods...why cannot the tall and super tall projects planned for other boom town cities happen here?
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  #285  
Old Posted Sep 9, 2020, 4:24 PM
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I'd say the reason is a mix of demand/space available to build on but I'm not a commercial or development guy so take my thought with a grain of salt.
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  #286  
Old Posted Sep 9, 2020, 8:08 PM
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Originally Posted by texastarkus View Post
When this project was first announced there was hope that it would be taller. Without getting on the bad side of the skyscraper forum gods...why cannot the tall and super tall projects planned for other boom town cities happen here?
We live in a city that is relatively poor, compared to most other major metropolitan areas.

On top of that, our major industries---military, tourism, health care---don't need amazing skyscrapers.

Super tall projects require a lot of money and potential tenants. At this moment in time we have neither in abundance, so there's just no point in building them here.
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  #287  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2020, 8:59 PM
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Originally Posted by micahinsa View Post
We live in a city that is relatively poor, compared to most other major metropolitan areas.

On top of that, our major industries---military, tourism, health care---don't need amazing skyscrapers.

Super tall projects require a lot of money and potential tenants. At this moment in time we have neither in abundance, so there's just no point in building them here.
All of this above, but I wonder what this pandemic did to the need for office space? My company is not going to have us ever go back full time. REI is selling their new headquarters and keeping people at home.

It will be very interesting to see.
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  #288  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2020, 12:29 AM
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All of this above, but I wonder what this pandemic did to the need for office space? My company is not going to have us ever go back full time. REI is selling their new headquarters and keeping people at home.

It will be very interesting to see.
Same here but I live and work in Manhattan. Many offices here remain empty.
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  #289  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2020, 2:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by micahinsa View Post
We live in a city that is relatively poor, compared to most other major metropolitan areas.

On top of that, our major industries---military, tourism, health care---don't need amazing skyscrapers.

Super tall projects require a lot of money and potential tenants. At this moment in time we have neither in abundance, so there's just no point in building them here.
That first sentence is completely outdated and incorrect, it also would play a small part in why the boom isn’t the same here as it is elsewhere. But that’s a different topic.
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  #290  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2020, 2:02 AM
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Originally Posted by sirkingwilliam View Post
That first sentence is completely outdated and incorrect, it also would play a small part in why the boom isn’t the same here as it is elsewhere. But that’s a different topic.
Didn't the San Antonio metro have the highest poverty rate in the nation in 2018?
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  #291  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2020, 5:54 AM
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Didn't the San Antonio metro have the highest poverty rate in the nation in 2018?
No. It did not.
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  #292  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2020, 8:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by micahinsa View Post
We live in a city that is relatively poor, compared to most other major metropolitan areas.

On top of that, our major industries---military, tourism, health care---don't need amazing skyscrapers.

Super tall projects require a lot of money and potential tenants. At this moment in time we have neither in abundance, so there's just no point in building them here.


F100-F500 and or other major corporations Headquartered in San Antonio could have chosen to build super talls downtown instead of suburban offices. Companies like Valero Energy, USAA, Clear Channel Worldwide, I heart Media, Nustar Energy, CST Brands, and Tesoro(Andeavor). In addition to those, H.E.B, Rackspace, Zachary, and even Whataburger could have graced our skyline with notable skyscrapers or high rises.

Austin doesn't have any companies of this magnitude yet has a more dominate skyline.

Furthermore, San Antonio's notable high rise office towers are scattered throughout the city and not just one location, for example, Austin's. If San Antonio developed the same way it would have a far larger skyline than Austin has today.



I have to wholeheartedly disagree with your comment.

I think it is a result of how more challenging it is to build due to the historical significance found in our downtown and the way our downtown was formed over time.

In short, can you imagine if USAA housed 15k employees downtown in mutiple sleek towers. Or any of the other aforementioned companies.
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2018 S. A. Pop.1.51 million
metro 2.5 million/REGION 4.7million
San Antonio economy and largest economic sectors. Annual contribution towards GDP.
U.S. Dept of Defense $48.5 billion/Manufacturing $40.5 billion/Healthcare-Biosciences $40 billion/Finance-Insurance $20 billion/Tourism $15 billion/ Technology $10 billion.
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  #293  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2020, 9:32 PM
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Guys pleeeeeeeze! It is not about who has the most and tallest skyscrapers all bunched up together. It is about who has a unique and memorable skyline and San Antonio has just that! Not a bunch of rectangular box high rises....
The Tower of the Americas, the Alamodome Spires, and the historical older buildings like the Tower Life Building,and the Emily Morgan, and others, and now the new Frost Bank tower is what makes a unique and distinguishable skyline. Again, the San Antonio skyline has just that!!
And there will be more additions, to our skyline....
I am envisioning a winding line of towers 10 stories and up from the Pearl/River North area all the way into downtown, and more new towers in the CBD in the next 5 to 10 years!!!

San Antonio: A Unique, Historical and Beautiful City
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  #294  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2020, 10:22 PM
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Guys pleeeeeeeze! It is not about who has the most and tallest skyscrapers all bunched up together. It is about who has a unique and memorable skyline and San Antonio has just that! Not a bunch of rectangular box high rises....
The Tower of the Americas, the Alamodome Spires, and the historical older buildings like the Tower Life Building,and the Emily Morgan, and others, and now the new Frost Bank tower is what makes a unique and distinguishable skyline. Again, the San Antonio skyline has just that!!
And there will be more additions, to our skyline....
I am envisioning a winding line of towers 10 stories and up from the Pearl/River North area all the way into downtown, and more new towers in the CBD in the next 5 to 10 years!!!

San Antonio: A Unique, Historical and Beautiful City


Pricesly, but this is a forum about Skycrapers and their are individuals who feel that our fine city is inferior because we dont have a Houston, Dallas or Austin, all steel and glass type skyline. There is a reason for this and it has nothing to do with this city being weak or poor. It seems those cities care more about their flashy image and San Antonio focuses more about its historical significance.

Unfortunately, this city has gone cold as far as super talls post the development of Tower of the Americas era. I am only referring to downtown and the number of significant sized skyscrapers. San Antonio is doing a dam good job with infil and residential development in the central core plus the respectable list of highrise proposals.

And I failed to mention Austin's Dell and Wholefoods, but overall S.A. has a considerably larger corporate base.
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2018 S. A. Pop.1.51 million
metro 2.5 million/REGION 4.7million
San Antonio economy and largest economic sectors. Annual contribution towards GDP.
U.S. Dept of Defense $48.5 billion/Manufacturing $40.5 billion/Healthcare-Biosciences $40 billion/Finance-Insurance $20 billion/Tourism $15 billion/ Technology $10 billion.
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  #295  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2020, 1:10 PM
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Census Bureau: San Antonio still poorest major U.S. metro but poverty rate declines

https://sanantonioreport.org/census-...rate-declines/

San Antonio remains the country’s poorest major metropolitan area, according to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau, though it made the most progress in beating back poverty among its peers of similar size.

In 2018, the Census Bureau reported that 15.4 percent of San Antonio metro area residents lived below the poverty line
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  #296  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2020, 2:08 PM
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Originally Posted by kingkirbythe.... View Post
Census Bureau: San Antonio still poorest major U.S. metro but poverty rate declines

https://sanantonioreport.org/census-...rate-declines/

San Antonio remains the country’s poorest major metropolitan area, according to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau, though it made the most progress in beating back poverty among its peers of similar size.

In 2018, the Census Bureau reported that 15.4 percent of San Antonio metro area residents lived below the poverty line
It has/had the highest poverty rate of the top 25 largest metros. That’s a bit of a cherry picked statistic and doesn’t really prove anything regarding the argument of why the boom period hasn’t brought as many high rises to downtown/urban core.
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  #297  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2020, 11:25 PM
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You are right. This thread is about the CPS buildings. Since the article about the census saying that the San Antonio area is the poorest city was moved to the off topic thread, perhaps all the comments talking about how poor San Antonio should be moved there too. It would make for a more complete conservation.
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  #298  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2020, 12:06 AM
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Originally Posted by kingkirbythe.... View Post
Census Bureau: San Antonio still poorest major U.S. metro but poverty rate declines

https://sanantonioreport.org/census-...rate-declines/

San Antonio remains the country’s poorest major metropolitan area, according to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau, though it made the most progress in beating back poverty among its peers of similar size.

In 2018, the Census Bureau reported that 15.4 percent of San Antonio metro area residents lived below the poverty line


There are far more metro areas in the U.S. that have notable skylines and only including the top 25 metros poverty percentage isn't a sufficient indicator to why San Antonio doesn't have more high rises U/C. Houston is only a mere half percentage less than S.A.,but has no shortage of skyscrapers.

Austin metro poverty rate is at 13.1% for 2019 and S.A. 13.5%.

San Antonio's poverty percentage fell between 2018 and 2019 according to the census.

If this included the top 50 metros that have notable skylines S.A wouldn't be listed as the poorest. Cities like Cleveland, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, Nashville all have significant skylines but have higher poverty rates than San Antonio.

I recall a list I posted of the top metros areas for overall personal income and S.A. tallied $12 billion more than Austin, and ranked respectfully amongst other metros of simillar size even with one's with a higher COL.

San Antonio metro poverty percentage is identical to that of Miami, Ft Lauderdale, West Palm beach metro. That skyline(skylines) doesn't appear to be that of a poverty stricken area.

Lastly, It is safe to say that high priced residential, etc, is not the targeted market for those amid the poverty level and located at a lower end of a socioeconomic stratification tier.


https://sanantonioreport.org/census-...rate-declines/
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2018 S. A. Pop.1.51 million
metro 2.5 million/REGION 4.7million
San Antonio economy and largest economic sectors. Annual contribution towards GDP.
U.S. Dept of Defense $48.5 billion/Manufacturing $40.5 billion/Healthcare-Biosciences $40 billion/Finance-Insurance $20 billion/Tourism $15 billion/ Technology $10 billion.

Last edited by Paul in S.A TX; Sep 21, 2020 at 1:04 AM.
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  #299  
Old Posted Sep 22, 2020, 7:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Paul in S.A TX View Post
I recall a list I posted of the top metros areas for overall personal income and S.A. tallied $12 billion more than Austin, and ranked respectfully amongst other metros of simillar size even with one's with a higher COL
I'm not sure about that figure. However, Austin's per capita personal income (2018) ranked 40 out of all the U.S. metros. San Antonio ranked 166 ($58,773 vs. $46,995). There were 384 metros ranked.

With regard to percent change between 2016 and 2018, Austin ranked 43 and San Antonio ranked 152.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis.


Other notables on the list:

Pittsburgh - #44
Nashville - #46
Miami - #50
Houston - #62
DFW - #63
Cincinnati - #75
Cleveland - #81
Las Vegas - #164

Last edited by ILUVSAT; Sep 22, 2020 at 7:55 PM.
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  #300  
Old Posted Sep 23, 2020, 5:23 AM
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Paul in S.A TX Paul in S.A TX is offline
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Originally Posted by ILUVSAT View Post
I'm not sure about that figure. However, Austin's per capita personal income (2018) ranked 40 out of all the U.S. metros. San Antonio ranked 166 ($58,773 vs. $46,995). There were 384 metros ranked.

With regard to percent change between 2016 and 2018, Austin ranked 43 and San Antonio ranked 152.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis.


Other notables on the list:

Pittsburgh - #44
Nashville - #46
Miami - #50
Houston - #62
DFW - #63
Cincinnati - #75
Cleveland - #81
Las Vegas - #164
Quote:
Originally Posted by ILUVSAT View Post
I'm not sure about that figure. However, Austin's per capita personal income (2018) ranked 40 out of all the U.S. metros. San Antonio ranked 166 ($58,773 vs. $46,995). There were 384 metros ranked.

With regard to percent change between 2016 and 2018, Austin ranked 43 and San Antonio ranked 152.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis.


Other notables on the list:

Pittsburgh - #44
Nashville - #46
Miami - #50
Houston - #62
DFW - #63
Cincinnati - #75
Cleveland - #81
Las Vegas - #164


Per capita income is one metric that can be used to give the economic strength of a city but this list includes way to many cities. Small cities like; Aames, Iowa, Chico, CA, Coeur d' Alene, Id, and Punta, Fla, etc. That said, if only major cities were listed, San Antonio wouldn't rank so unfavorably.

The list I am referring to, is Total Metro Personal Income which is a metric for an entire workforce populace, and not a metric (Per capita Income)determined by dividing the total income by the total population which includes the retired, unemployed, children, etc.

San Antonio's workforce generated billions more than the Austin area. The Total metro personal income thread can be found on SSP forum. San Antonio ranked 27th and Austin ranked in the high 30's.

Austin definitely has higher incomes but it also has a higher COL, with median home prices being the number one trade-off. San Antonio has a higher disposable income. This is where S.A. closes the gap a bit and things are less offset.
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2018 S. A. Pop.1.51 million
metro 2.5 million/REGION 4.7million
San Antonio economy and largest economic sectors. Annual contribution towards GDP.
U.S. Dept of Defense $48.5 billion/Manufacturing $40.5 billion/Healthcare-Biosciences $40 billion/Finance-Insurance $20 billion/Tourism $15 billion/ Technology $10 billion.

Last edited by Paul in S.A TX; Sep 23, 2020 at 12:17 PM.
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