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  #14201  
Old Posted Sep 1, 2020, 4:17 AM
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SEFTA SEFTA is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eixample View Post
Great post. Important to compare this to other actually executed arena "development" schemes from other cities.
2 more cents
I think we should see the Riverfront much like NY treated Battery Park City. In my eyes the most successful urban waterfront development. Mostly residential. Traditional tree-lined cobblestoned streets, brick detailing, lush landscaping. Helping to tie Penn's Landing to Old City and Society Hill. A continuous waterfront promenade. Added to the west of West Side Highway, much like Columbus Blvd (to be renamed "Delaware River Boulevard")

NO ARENAS!

Battery Park City Portrait x

Battery Park City Plan

Tree-lined streets
Battery Park City Streets x

Battery Park City Scape

Landscaped Waterfront Promenades
Battery Park City Park x

battery-park-city-apartments

Battery Park Esplanade

Photograph by Wayne Chasan
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Last edited by SEFTA; Sep 1, 2020 at 4:36 AM.
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  #14202  
Old Posted Sep 1, 2020, 12:12 PM
Justin7 Justin7 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcgrath618 View Post
Is the Jefferson project they’re referencing the East Market tower? If so, isn’t it supposed to be about 30 floors?
It's 19 (or 20) floors, but 362ft.
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  #14203  
Old Posted Sep 1, 2020, 3:14 PM
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summersm343 summersm343 is offline
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CDR September Submissions

700 Delaware Ave
-This went last month as well, so they're returning again
-488 total apartments and ground floor retail in two 7-story buildings
PDF:
https://www.phila.gov/media/20200825...8-2020-CDR.pdf

1901 N. American Street
-We've seen renderings of this already. This street is on fire!!
-Fantastic design
-6-story building
-Apartments with ground floor retail
PDF:
https://www.phila.gov/media/20200825...8-2020-CDR.pdf

3449 Scotts Lane
-On the edge of East Falls and Allegheny West
-Three 4-story buildings
-220 total apartments
PDF:
https://www.phila.gov/media/20200825...8-2020-CDR.pdf

3314 Fairmount Ave
-Mantua section of West Philly
-6-story building
-90 apartments with ground floor commercial/industrial
PDF:
https://www.phila.gov/media/20200825...8-2020-CDR.pdf

4701 Pine St
-Garden Court section of West Philly
-7-story building
PDF:
https://www.phila.gov/media/20200826...8-2020-CDR.pdf

1 Red Lion Rd
-Bustleton section of Northeast Philly
-New 1,000,000+ sq. ft. distribution center for UPS
PDF:
https://www.phila.gov/media/20200825...8-2020-CDR.pdf
-220 total apartments, ground floor retail/commercial
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  #14204  
Old Posted Sep 1, 2020, 3:18 PM
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Mixed-Use Project on 10th & Girard Getting a 2nd Phase and a New Look

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When we last covered this property, the developers had a plan to build a six-story building with 120 apartments, 12K sqft of retail space, and 44 underground parking spaces. This plan retained the tennis center next door, seemingly fulfilling the civic use requirement in the deed restriction. And oh, the renderings from SgRA were pretty great.

Today, you can see that the old tennis courts are gone, with construction starting earlier this year and stair and elevator towers now evident. And the building that housed the old tennis center remains intact, even though we don’t believe it’s actively being used right now.

Now it appears the the former home of the tennis center is not long for this world, as the developers are now planning a second phase of their project. Per the Civic Design Review packets released yesterday, another building could rise on the western portion of this property, adding an additional 120 units, 11,500 sqft of commercial space, and 55 underground parking spots to the mix.
Phase 1 under construction:


Rendering of Phase 1 and proposed Phase 2 addition:


Read more here:
http://www.ocfrealty.com/naked-phill...phase-new-look
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  #14205  
Old Posted Sep 1, 2020, 3:55 PM
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220 Units Planned on Border of Allegheny West & East Falls







Read more here:
http://www.rising.realestate/220-uni...st-east-falls/
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  #14206  
Old Posted Sep 1, 2020, 3:59 PM
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179 Units + Retail Proposed on American St. in Kensington

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The transformation of N. American St. in Kensington from an industrial center to a mixed-use corridor will take another step forward if a new proposal at 1705 N. American St. comes to fruition. 1705 N. American St. is a 38,198 square foot Industrial Commercial Mixed-Use (ICMX) zoned property that currently is the location of Drexel Foods, a chicken and beef product provider.

Developers are proposing to build a 73 foot tall, 182,000 square foot structure with 179 residential units, 9,900 square feet of commercial space, 42 automobile parking spots, and 100 bike spaces.






Read more here:
http://www.rising.realestate/179-uni...in-kensington/
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  #14207  
Old Posted Sep 2, 2020, 6:26 PM
Nelsondvm2015 Nelsondvm2015 is offline
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I was walking around Northern Liberties today, and it’s amazing how much the projects are growing so rapidly. I couldn’t get good photos of North Liberty Triangle, South Liberty Triangle, or the Piazza part deux; however, they’re looking great and going to make the entirety of NoLibs appear very dense.

I did get to photo a couple projects. 807 N 3rd Street is coming along nicely and has topped out. It would be so much better with retail, but still a fairly handsome project.





However, the project at 3rd and Poplar is massive. I’m happy with how this one is turning out and hope it provides a little retail.









This is a view of the 3rd & Poplar peeking over Liberty Lands Park.

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  #14208  
Old Posted Sep 2, 2020, 10:23 PM
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El Duderino El Duderino is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nelsondvm2015 View Post
I was walking around Northern Liberties today, and it’s amazing how much the projects are growing so rapidly. I couldn’t get good photos of North Liberty Triangle, South Liberty Triangle, or the Piazza part deux; however, they’re looking great and going to make the entirety of NoLibs appear very dense.
I was driving south from Kensington on 2nd and was so surprised by how different NoLibs feels at 2nd and Girard. I was by there just a couple weeks ago and it already feels BIGGER...and this is without even being able to see Piazza Terminal creeping up in the background yet. It’s going to be quite a residential hub once all of these projects rise and wrap up in quick succession.
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  #14209  
Old Posted Sep 2, 2020, 11:03 PM
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My god the utility lines...
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  #14210  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2020, 12:13 AM
TonyTone TonyTone is offline
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Originally Posted by Busy Bee View Post
My god the utility lines...
Is there a reason philly isn't putting the lines underground?

I think we are the only city slacking behind in above ground lines still.
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  #14211  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2020, 1:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyTone View Post
Is there a reason philly isn't putting the lines underground?

I think we are the only city slacking behind in above ground lines still.
Most cities in North America and East Asia have above-ground utility lines. Tokyo, Osaka, Seoul, Taipei, New York, San Francisco, Chicago, Seattle...
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  #14212  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2020, 12:22 PM
cardeza cardeza is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyTone View Post
Is there a reason philly isn't putting the lines underground?

I think we are the only city slacking behind in above ground lines still.
Its not the City's responsibility- they don't own the lines and cost would be the #1, #2 and #3 reason not to do it. Not to mention the area under the sidewalk is congested already with other utilities.
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  #14213  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2020, 12:55 PM
Londonee Londonee is offline
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Originally Posted by hammersklavier View Post
Most cities in North America and East Asia have above-ground utility lines. Tokyo, Osaka, Seoul, Taipei, New York, San Francisco, Chicago, Seattle...
This is a bit of a stretch - most of these cities are all buried in a HUGE section in and around their core - we're only buried in small chunk of Center City river to river. And now that we're expanding greater Center City's "boundaries" it's a bit of a joke.

Where in NYC? Staten Island and Queens? come on.
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  #14214  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2020, 1:18 PM
TonyTone TonyTone is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Londonee View Post
This is a bit of a stretch - most of these cities are all buried in a HUGE section in and around their core - we're only buried in small chunk of Center City river to river. And now that we're expanding greater Center City's "boundaries" it's a bit of a joke.

Where in NYC? Staten Island and Queens? come on.
Yea I knew I wasn't trippin, I travel to NY and I haven't seen overhead lines like I do in Philly, Only Center city has lines underground and the rest of the city is lined up like its 1900.
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  #14215  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2020, 1:19 PM
TonyTone TonyTone is offline
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Originally Posted by cardeza View Post
Its not the City's responsibility- they don't own the lines and cost would be the #1, #2 and #3 reason not to do it. Not to mention the area under the sidewalk is congested already with other utilities.
They should be moving lines underground when they reconstruct the Sidewalks/streets.

3 birds with 1 stone.
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  #14216  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2020, 1:55 PM
3rd&Brown 3rd&Brown is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Londonee View Post
This is a bit of a stretch - most of these cities are all buried in a HUGE section in and around their core - we're only buried in small chunk of Center City river to river. And now that we're expanding greater Center City's "boundaries" it's a bit of a joke.

Where in NYC? Staten Island and Queens? come on.
Seriously.

I live in the center of Brooklyn in an area that's been relatively run down and only has received renewed interest in the past 3-4 years (Crown Heights).

There's not a utility line in site.

At a minimum, Philadelphia should require that when a project is of a certain scale (i.e. a full city block) burying the lines that run along the project's perimeter should be required.

In places like Northern Liberties and South Kensington, this would have almost by default buried many of the lines at some point.

Another missed opportunity. I would never assume Kenney could ever think of something like this, considering he can't even pick up the trash. But I digress.
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  #14217  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2020, 2:54 PM
allovertown allovertown is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3rd&Brown View Post
Seriously.

I live in the center of Brooklyn in an area that's been relatively run down and only has received renewed interest in the past 3-4 years (Crown Heights).

There's not a utility line in site.

At a minimum, Philadelphia should require that when a project is of a certain scale (i.e. a full city block) burying the lines that run along the project's perimeter should be required.

In places like Northern Liberties and South Kensington, this would have almost by default buried many of the lines at some point.

Another missed opportunity. I would never assume Kenney could ever think of something like this, considering he can't even pick up the trash. But I digress.
Agreed. Speaking as someone who has never given a shit about the aesthetics of power lines, it's still just really perplexing from a practical standpoint that we haven't slowly been migrating them underground when there are opportunities like those you describe or when a road is getting torn up anyway to replace a gas line or a water line. It's just safer and more reliable.

The best time to start a program like this would have 30 years ago. But the second best time is now.
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  #14218  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2020, 4:06 PM
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SEFTA SEFTA is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyTone View Post
They should be moving lines underground when they reconstruct the Sidewalks/streets.

3 birds with 1 stone.


I always think about it when after a bad storm, 1000s of utility trucks are dispatched replacing downed power lines etc.
My cynical mind can't help but think that it's an entire industry unto itself. $MILLIONS each storm.
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  #14219  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2020, 7:31 PM
cardeza cardeza is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyTone View Post
They should be moving lines underground when they reconstruct the Sidewalks/streets.

3 birds with 1 stone.
apparently you aren't understanding what Im saying. There is no available real estate in many cases and you would have to move existing infrastructure in some cases to make room. You have to go much deeper than is required for a simple sidewalk replacement- that is a depth of like 4". Feeds for commercial buildings and schools are usually underground...partially because of the voltage coming in, most large buildings have their own transformers to step down voltage.
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  #14220  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2020, 7:32 PM
cardeza cardeza is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SEFTA View Post


I always think about it when after a bad storm, 1000s of utility trucks are dispatched replacing downed power lines etc.
My cynical mind can't help but think that it's an entire industry unto itself. $MILLIONS each storm.
mostly in the suburbs where lines are usually in close proximity to trees. This isn't nearly as big of a problem in Philly where most service comes in through back alleys and rear shared driveways.
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