HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #121  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 12:46 AM
ThePhun1 ThePhun1 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Houston/Galveston
Posts: 1,888
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
That skyscraper part makes sense. These cities were building them in the same era.
But as I've (and some others) have said, that's just one section, and maybe
30% of what downtown LA is.
For most people, Downtown, if applicable, is the skyscraper district and maybe an area or two directly connected closeby.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #122  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 12:55 AM
ThePhun1 ThePhun1 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Houston/Galveston
Posts: 1,888
Quote:
Originally Posted by JManc View Post
^ true and I made the clarification regarding DTLA. The areas where the skyscrapers are feels similar to Houston and other sunbelt cities...there's nothing in most Sun belt cities remotely similar to the older part of LA downtown.



That was my personal opinion based on my observations of both places. There are parts the Montrose area that have similar vibe and feel to parts of LA. Especially north of Westheimer and in and around the Waugh Dr. area. Essentially the denser areas that are a tight mishmash new townhouses, older bungalows plus the few remaining garden style apartments.
I'd say Montrose is closer to Austin or San Francisco (and not just because of you know what) than LA.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #123  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 1:08 AM
LA21st LA21st is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 5,535
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePhun1 View Post
For most people, Downtown, if applicable, is the skyscraper district and maybe an area or two directly connected closeby.
Yea, the historic core is connected to the skyscraper district. It actually blends into it, outside of Bunker Hill. The historic core was the cbd of downtown LA for decades too, so I'm confused why they would be considered separate areas. This wouldnt be true for any other city.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #124  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 1:39 AM
ThePhun1 ThePhun1 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Houston/Galveston
Posts: 1,888
It definitely would for LA but not every city. For some, they just call it "Old [insert city]" to distinguish it from the Central Business District.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #125  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 5:58 PM
hammersklavier's Avatar
hammersklavier hammersklavier is offline
Your 2016 AAC Champs!
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: 今日...? 関西(大阪、神戸、京都)
Posts: 5,820
Quote:
Originally Posted by Centropolis View Post
the moraines don’t exhibit much relief at all...as a whole chicagoland is extraordinarily notable for its lack of topography compared to almost every other us region. the moraines are only noticeable because the surrounding topography is so incredibly flat. the city itself feels almost as flat as new orleans!

have you been to chicago? its the flattest midwestern region i can think of by quite a large margin. granted i don’t know greater detroit other than quick runs in and out on the expressway or flying.
The largest moraine complex in the United States is Long Island, Staten Island, and the Outer Lands ...

It's interesting to note that the flattest lands overall in the Midwest are associated with proglacial lakebeds. The bed of Lake Agassiz is probably the largest stretch of near perfectly flat terrain you'll find on the continent, and Chicago proper is actually built in what was once the margin of proglacial Lake Chicago -- a Lake Michigan precursor.
__________________
Urban Rambles | Hidden City

Who knows but that, on the lower levels, I speak for you?’ (Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man)
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #126  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 6:14 PM
toddguy toddguy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Columbus Ohio
Posts: 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by pj3000 View Post
All Great Lakes cities look similarly "coastal"... simply because they are on a coast. And by physical nature of having that defined linear boundary of the lakshore (and usually relatively flat relief in close proximity to the shore) their urban layouts are generally going to be grid patterned.

I'd say that western Great Lakes cities look alike and eastern Great Lakes cities look alike. With eastern Great Lakes cities looking more northeastern and western Great Lakes cities looking more midwestern... primarily based on differences in regional topography... northeast being hilly and midwest being flat.
I like the look of Duluth. A smaller city but it looks larger probably because it stretches in a linear fashion and because of the rising topography, along with being older for it's size I guess. Is there another Great Lakes city that looks like it with the land rising pretty quickly from the lakefront?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #127  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 6:25 PM
Crawford Crawford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Brooklyn, NYC/Polanco, DF
Posts: 22,785
Quote:
Originally Posted by IrishIllini View Post
TLA isn't New York or Chicago, but it is fairly dense for being almost entirely detached SFHs.
LA has a (slightly) lower proportion of SFH than Chicago. LA is not really SFH-dominated, at all, at least not by American standards.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #128  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 6:31 PM
the urban politician the urban politician is online now
The City
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Chicago region
Posts: 19,840
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
LA has a (slightly) lower proportion of SFH than Chicago. LA is not really SFH-dominated, at all, at least not by American standards.
You have zero basis to say this, like most of your claims, actually.

Yeah yeah you drive by Chicago neighborhoods visiting your sister or whatever, but once again it doesn't seem to sink in that what looks like SFH are usually 2 or 3 flats.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #129  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 6:34 PM
Steely Dan's Avatar
Steely Dan Steely Dan is offline
devout Pizzatarian
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Lincoln Square, Chicago
Posts: 23,339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
LA has a (slightly) lower proportion of SFH than Chicago.
are you sure about that? 2016 ACS data says otherwise:

chicago one unit detached - 25.6%

LA one unit detached - 38.6%



sources:
chicago data
LA data
__________________
If a Pizza is baked in a forest, and no one is around to eat it, is it still delicious?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #130  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 6:36 PM
the urban politician the urban politician is online now
The City
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Chicago region
Posts: 19,840
^ Thats fake data. Crawford holds the key to the truth
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #131  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 6:38 PM
Steely Dan's Avatar
Steely Dan Steely Dan is offline
devout Pizzatarian
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Lincoln Square, Chicago
Posts: 23,339
Quote:
Originally Posted by the urban politician View Post
^ Thats fake data. Crawford holds the key to the truth
no, in this case i imagine crawford will respect the data, as it comes straight from the US census bureau.

but expect a textbook goal post move in 3..... 2..... 1.....
__________________
If a Pizza is baked in a forest, and no one is around to eat it, is it still delicious?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #132  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 6:41 PM
The North One's Avatar
The North One The North One is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 4,732
Oh no, he's very much willing to flat out deny census data when he doesn't agree with it.
__________________
Spawn of questionable parentage!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #133  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 6:44 PM
JManc's Avatar
JManc JManc is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Houston
Posts: 30,017
Just based on my personal observations of LA and Chicago, LA seemed to have waaay more SF homes than Chicago. When I think of LA housing...I think of the Brady Bunch house.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #134  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 6:47 PM
Crawford Crawford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Brooklyn, NYC/Polanco, DF
Posts: 22,785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
are you sure about that? 2016 ACS data says otherwise:
2016 ACS Estimates show that LA has a slighter lower proportion of SFH homes as Chicago.

Chicago- 52.3% SFH detached homes
LA- 49.7% SFH detached homes.

https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/...prodType=table

Again, LA is not the SFH wonderland as implied by the stereotype. There really is a ton of multifamily.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #135  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 6:49 PM
Steely Dan's Avatar
Steely Dan Steely Dan is offline
devout Pizzatarian
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Lincoln Square, Chicago
Posts: 23,339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
2016 ACS Estimates show that LA has a slighter lower proportion of SFH homes as Chicago.

Chicago- 52.3% SFH detached homes
LA- 49.7% SFH detached homes.

https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/...prodType=table
try again, whatever you linked to, it absolutely does not back up your numbers.

the numbers i posted were straight from 2016 ACS estimates that i directly linked to.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Again, LA is not the SFH wonderland as implied by the stereotype. There really is a ton of multifamily.
i don't care about LA's stereotype vs. its reality. i was strictly refuting your statement that LA has a lower proportion of SFH than chicago.

the facts say otherwise (not that the facts have ever gotten in your way, anyway).
__________________
If a Pizza is baked in a forest, and no one is around to eat it, is it still delicious?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #136  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 6:51 PM
Crawford Crawford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Brooklyn, NYC/Polanco, DF
Posts: 22,785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
try again, what ever you linked to, it absolutely does not back up your numbers.
Um, did you look at the link? What on earth are you objecting to?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #137  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 6:55 PM
Steely Dan's Avatar
Steely Dan Steely Dan is offline
devout Pizzatarian
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Lincoln Square, Chicago
Posts: 23,339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Um, did you look at the link? What on earth are you objecting to?
there was absolutely nothing in the link that provided any information about the percentage of SFH's in LA vs. chicago.

you should probably follow your own link, because it ain't going to where you apparently think it's going.
__________________
If a Pizza is baked in a forest, and no one is around to eat it, is it still delicious?

Last edited by Steely Dan; Jan 29, 2018 at 7:46 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #138  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 7:01 PM
the urban politician the urban politician is online now
The City
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Chicago region
Posts: 19,840
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
there was absolutely nothing in that link that provided any information about the percentage of SFH's in LA vs. chicago.

you should probably follow your own link, because it ain't going to where you might think it's going.
Crawford's link takes you to a cyber realm called "Crawfordland", where data supports all of his personal biases.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #139  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 7:46 PM
pj3000's Avatar
pj3000 pj3000 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Pittsburgh & Miami
Posts: 5,549
Quote:
Originally Posted by toddguy View Post
I like the look of Duluth. A smaller city but it looks larger probably because it stretches in a linear fashion and because of the rising topography, along with being older for it's size I guess. Is there another Great Lakes city that looks like it with the land rising pretty quickly from the lakefront?
No city with as steep a rise from the lakefront as Duluth has that I know of.

Hamilton, ON has the Niagara Escarpment west of the city




Erie, PA rises sharply from the waterfront, but only for a short run, and then in a series of long slopes up to the Allegheny Plateau south of the city



Winter shots with frozen Presque Isle Bay and a snow-capped "peak"



Reply With Quote
     
     
  #140  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 8:17 PM
Sun Belt Sun Belt is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: The Envy of the World
Posts: 4,929
Quote:
Originally Posted by JManc View Post
Just based on my personal observations of LA and Chicago, LA seemed to have waaay more SF homes than Chicago. When I think of LA housing...I think of the Brady Bunch house.
I'd love to live in this Los Angeles neighborhood. Take a tour! It backs right up to a moat, which is also known as the LA River. Low traffic, but being centrally located just off the Hollywood Freeway.


https://www.google.com/maps/place/11...4d-118.3756193

https://www.google.com/maps/@34.1432...7i13312!8i6656

Price estimate: $1.8 million

Last edited by Sun Belt; Jan 29, 2018 at 8:47 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:46 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.