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  #121  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2016, 6:52 PM
HX_Guy HX_Guy is offline
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Beautiful...still feel the hotel name/brand so doesn't fit though. When I think Garden Inn, I picture something along these lines...



Would it not have been possible to just have it as a standard Hilton hotel? Maybe something like the Hilton Monroe Hotel?
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  #122  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2016, 7:56 PM
exit2lef exit2lef is offline
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Nook, the restaurant in the Hilton Garden Inn, soft opened today. I had a very nice meatball sandwich and side salad in the busy dining room. The patio was surprisingly active for such a hot day.
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  #123  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2016, 8:03 PM
vwwolfe vwwolfe is offline
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Is it just me or does the Hilton Garden Inn sign they placed on the west side of the building facing central look cheap and tacky?
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  #124  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2016, 2:13 PM
phxhbg phxhbg is offline
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renovation costs

I'd like to know how much MORE it would have cost to actually create the vision Grace had 10 years ago? We all know what happened with Mortgages Ltd. but at this point we know that money was spent by the current owners. I'm interested to know the spread between what we all wanted and what we ended up getting.
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  #125  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2016, 4:41 PM
gymratmanaz gymratmanaz is online now
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Kinda "Glass Half Empty".........
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  #126  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2016, 4:42 PM
gymratmanaz gymratmanaz is online now
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That patio was rocking yesterday. looks really popular...NOOK.
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  #127  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2016, 6:37 PM
biggus diggus biggus diggus is online now
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We ate there yesterday, sat inside. I work very hard to be able to afford walls, floors, and ceilings so I basically refuse to eat outside like an animal or homeless person but you're right the patio was "rocking".

The food there is fantastic.
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  #128  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2016, 5:28 PM
phoenixheadphones phoenixheadphones is offline
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Originally Posted by biggus diggus View Post
We ate there yesterday, sat inside. I work very hard to be able to afford walls, floors, and ceilings so I basically refuse to eat outside like an animal or homeless person but you're right the patio was "rocking".

Last edited by phoenixheadphones; Apr 11, 2016 at 9:23 PM.
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  #129  
Old Posted Apr 22, 2016, 1:39 AM
Jjs5056 Jjs5056 is offline
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Picking the HGI brand for this property was an obvious wasted opportunity from the start. If not a total custom boutique hotel like Hotel Monroe, there are dozens of new lifestyle concepts or higher-end brands that would have been more appropriate. I wouldn't recommend a 'W' but a hotel with something that attracts night-time out-of-city guests to it would have been ideal. "Drinks at the W" sounds way cooler than "Gotta make it to the Hilton Garden Inn tonight!"

That said, most of the concerns I had with the brand were mitigated - the reviews all note that the experience was better than most others. They included a unique bar/restaurant concept into the lobby (is there signage outside for this?). And, they signed an impressive restaurant anchor.

If the Security Building leased out their ground level, this part of Central could be a good mix of shops and restaurants/bars. But, I don't see shops opening with the current surroundings, which is unfortunate.
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  #130  
Old Posted Apr 22, 2016, 4:00 PM
Obadno Obadno is offline
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Originally Posted by Jjs5056 View Post
Picking the HGI brand for this property was an obvious wasted opportunity from the start. If not a total custom boutique hotel like Hotel Monroe, there are dozens of new lifestyle concepts or higher-end brands that would have been more appropriate. I wouldn't recommend a 'W' but a hotel with something that attracts night-time out-of-city guests to it would have been ideal. "Drinks at the W" sounds way cooler than "Gotta make it to the Hilton Garden Inn tonight!"

That said, most of the concerns I had with the brand were mitigated - the reviews all note that the experience was better than most others. They included a unique bar/restaurant concept into the lobby (is there signage outside for this?). And, they signed an impressive restaurant anchor.

If the Security Building leased out their ground level, this part of Central could be a good mix of shops and restaurants/bars. But, I don't see shops opening with the current surroundings, which is unfortunate.
With the amount of money they put into the rehab I'd hope that maybe they up-brand the hotel at some point.
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  #131  
Old Posted Oct 2, 2019, 11:57 PM
ASU Diablo ASU Diablo is online now
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Hate to bring up a 3 year old thread but...

I came across the topic of the Steinegger Lodging House on City Data forums and this building had completely slipped my mind...

I know at some point when CSM was doing the rehab to the Professional Building, they had plans for the Lodging House but obviously never went anywhere. With the momentum downtown has had over the years, wonder what the hold up is? I guess there is no incentive to do at this point since they haven't been able to lease out the remaining retail space...

Exit2lef provided some great info there but wondering if anyone knew more about future plans?
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  #132  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2020, 6:56 PM
ASU Diablo ASU Diablo is online now
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The Steinegger Lodging House in Downtown Phoenix Bites the Dust

Phoenix New Times take on this. Some good info on here...

Quote:
The historian and preservationist Robert Melikian was frustrated and sad. He said last week that he wanted to rid the world of what he called “demo by neglect,” a trend that rewards owners of historic buildings for letting those buildings rot.

“Last night, the Phoenix Historic Preservation Commission voted not to add the Steinegger Lodging House to the Phoenix Historic Property Register,” he explained. “The building is already listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and it’s the second-oldest commercial building in Arizona. But it’s slated to be torn down in a few weeks, because the owner let it crumble to the point where it’s not salvageable.”

The Steinegger is a nondescript three-story building on Monroe Street just east of Central Avenue, built as a lodging house in 1889 by an immigrant entrepreneur named Alexander Steinegger. It was closed in 2004 and abandoned. “That’s when the neglect started,” Melikian sighs. “Sixteen years of transients going through there. The building was open to the elements. It was boarded up in 2017, and they put the fake white façade on it, so it became invisible.”

Melikian said he thought of the Steinegger as a “time machine to a lost era.” He cited the building’s half-dozen 19th-century Rumford fireplaces, designed by the physicist Sir Benjamin Thompson. The Rumfords are the only such heating structures left in Arizona.

“There are lost art things in the building that would be treasures for future generations,” said Melikian, whose family owns the historic San Carlos Hotel. As a longtime preservationist and author of books about Phoenix’s architectural history, he’s seen plenty of beautiful old buildings get razed to make room for parking lots or chain restaurants. But, he insisted, he didn’t see last Monday’s four-to-three vote coming.

“The Phoenix Historical Society had collected 28,000 virtual signatures in just four days from people opposed to the Steinegger teardown,” Melikian said. “We presented two reports from a brilliant, sympathetic lawyer who came up with a solution for saving the Steinegger. All we needed was a little time, but the city rejected it. We were ignored and dismissed and it’s a shame.”

That solution involved dismantling the west wall of the building and using the bricks to shore up the other three sides of the structure, Melikian said. He telephoned the owner of Minneapolis-based CSM Lodging and offered to pay the $140,000 to have this work done. “He’s an award-winning builder who’s built here before,” he said. “I told him about how he could win another award by not tearing down the Steinegger but rehabbing it instead. He hasn’t returned my call.”

While he waited, Melikian and his colleagues had a bigger goal in mind. “We don’t want buildings to be ignored to death anymore,” he said, “or see builders be honored for demolition by neglect.”

It’s something that happens a lot around here, he said. “In our extreme weather, buildings deteriorate, and you have developers who buy an important property and let it fall apart on purpose. If we want architectural history, we have to get rid of this ‘demolition by neglect’ situation. No other state has it.”

Toward that end, Melikian and other preservationists have hooked up with Preserve Phoenix, a nonprofit that attempts to save old, estimable buildings. “We’re going to join forces with the Midcentury Modern people, who have been so well organized in their preservation work, and those of us who are interested in older buildings, to fight this kind of neglect and destruction.”

The group, he explained, will support politicians who back preservation policies, and will promote the end of “demolition by neglect.”


“All we’ve had up until now is the ability to shame building owners into doing the right thing,” Melikian said. “It hasn’t worked in most cases. Our victories have been rare, and we tend to lose. We certainly lost this time.”
Source: https://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/arts...-down-11476674
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  #133  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2020, 7:41 PM
PHXFlyer11 PHXFlyer11 is offline
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I wish they would not have allowed their teardown until construction on a replacement project was imminent. We're going to be left with a dirt lot for a decade. It's going to be a LONG time until a lot that small is viable for high-rise construction in Phoenix. Probably will end us as parking for the Hilton Garden Inn. Awful.
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  #134  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2020, 10:21 PM
Ballister Ballister is offline
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Originally Posted by PHXFlyer11 View Post
I wish they would not have allowed their teardown until construction on a replacement project was imminent. We're going to be left with a dirt lot for a decade. It's going to be a LONG time until a lot that small is viable for high-rise construction in Phoenix. Probably will end us as parking for the Hilton Garden Inn. Awful.
Boy, did you miss the point of the previous post.
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  #135  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2020, 4:04 PM
PHXFlyer11 PHXFlyer11 is offline
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Boy, did you miss the point of the previous post.
I read it. I had no interest in commenting on how they intend to preserve future buildings. Bottom line is they fail over and over. It's the definition of insanity.

So instead I chose to provide what I feel a better solution in that the city develops a policy that considers the benefit of what's being developed vs. what's being lost rather than just clearing buildings from leveling based on their status in isolation.
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  #136  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2020, 5:00 PM
biggus diggus biggus diggus is online now
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Originally Posted by PHXFlyer11 View Post
I wish they would not have allowed their teardown until construction on a replacement project was imminent.
What would be the point of kicking the can down the road? The building has to come down.
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  #137  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2020, 5:08 PM
PHXFlyer11 PHXFlyer11 is offline
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Originally Posted by biggus diggus View Post
What would be the point of kicking the can down the road? The building has to come down.
Because a building is still better than a dirt lot or parking lot. I don't buy the "it's gonna fall over next week" image that was portrayed. It could be rehabbed if they really wanted to. So why not sell it and let the buyer decide if they will build something or rehab? Just tearing it down to sell it is a garbage excuse. Tearing it down because something is ready to be build there that provides the community a benefit like more housing is more legitimate of a reason to tear something down, especially when it's "historical".

You will never get that building back. So if you tear it down, tear it down because something else is going in it's place.
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  #138  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2020, 5:48 PM
biggus diggus biggus diggus is online now
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The building is beyond the point of getting it back already. I just spent a week in downtown Memphis where there are dozens of buildings that have been abandoned for decades, it's depressing. I won't tell you what opinion to have but I certainly don't get the "I'd rather have this old collapsing thing than a vacant lot" attitude. If anything having that building sitting there is a deterrent to a potential developer.
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  #139  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2020, 5:55 PM
CrestedSaguaro CrestedSaguaro is offline
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Originally Posted by PHXFlyer11 View Post
Because a building is still better than a dirt lot or parking lot. I don't buy the "it's gonna fall over next week" image that was portrayed. It could be rehabbed if they really wanted to. So why not sell it and let the buyer decide if they will build something or rehab? Just tearing it down to sell it is a garbage excuse. Tearing it down because something is ready to be build there that provides the community a benefit like more housing is more legitimate of a reason to tear something down, especially when it's "historical".

You will never get that building back. So if you tear it down, tear it down because something else is going in it's place.
Perhaps give them a chance? We do not know what they have planned and they have been tossing around a high-rise in this location for several years now with a fairly recent rendering which I found and posted a while back. Also, I don't think there is enough space to add a surface parking lot and pretty sure it would have to go to the City of Phoenix since the street and sidewalk are not zoned nor designed for a parking lot entrance.
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  #140  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2020, 7:31 PM
PHXFlyer11 PHXFlyer11 is offline
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Originally Posted by CrestedSaguaro View Post
Perhaps give them a chance? We do not know what they have planned and they have been tossing around a high-rise in this location for several years now with a fairly recent rendering which I found and posted a while back. Also, I don't think there is enough space to add a surface parking lot and pretty sure it would have to go to the City of Phoenix since the street and sidewalk are not zoned nor designed for a parking lot entrance.
Haven't they already stated they have no plans to build and are going to market the land? The renderings were pie in the sky to attract a buyer.
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