HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada > Alberta & British Columbia > Vancouver > Transportation & Infrastructure


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #4641  
Old Posted May 2, 2020, 3:47 PM
officedweller officedweller is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 31,360
Thanks for the info!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4642  
Old Posted May 12, 2020, 4:37 AM
officedweller officedweller is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 31,360
Richards bike lane at Smithe.

Pics by me today.





Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4643  
Old Posted May 24, 2020, 11:28 PM
TheTerminalCity TheTerminalCity is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 73
Slow Streets

City of Vancouver has rolled out 12 km of 'slow streets' connecting Queen Elizabeth Park-Trout Lake-New Brighton in a rough L-shape path.



Curious to know what people here think of this. I'm a big fan of this, especially as we head into summer and better weather. It's a great opportunity for people to have access to their streets and get out while maintaining distancing. Seems absurd that its taken this long...could only imagine how fast Vision would have moved on this.

Any thoughts on where you'd want to see the next 12km of slow streets in Vancouver?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4644  
Old Posted May 25, 2020, 4:46 AM
scottN scottN is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTerminalCity View Post
City of Vancouver has rolled out 12 km of 'slow streets' connecting Queen Elizabeth Park-Trout Lake-New Brighton in a rough L-shape path.

Curious to know what people here think of this. I'm a big fan of this, especially as we head into summer and better weather. It's a great opportunity for people to have access to their streets and get out while maintaining distancing. Seems absurd that its taken this long...could only imagine how fast Vision would have moved on this.

Any thoughts on where you'd want to see the next 12km of slow streets in Vancouver?
Any street where the sidewalk is less than 2m wide should be a slow street for COVID-19 physical distancing.

I often use the section of Lakewood between Central Valley Greenway and trout lake. Usually I am running with 1-2 kids riding bikes. Even before this was declared a slow street I often ran on the street so my kids didn't have to ride their bikes on the sidewalk.

IMO every bike route that is not also an arterial road should be a "slow street" for this very reason.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4645  
Old Posted May 25, 2020, 5:01 AM
aberdeen5698's Avatar
aberdeen5698 aberdeen5698 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 3,600
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottN View Post
IMO every bike route that is not also an arterial road should be a "slow street" for this very reason.
The city has been signing all of the residential streets with bike routes at 30 km/h for quite some time now.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4646  
Old Posted May 25, 2020, 5:54 AM
VancouverOfTheFuture's Avatar
VancouverOfTheFuture VancouverOfTheFuture is offline
Vancouverite
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posts: 2,058
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottN View Post
Any street where the sidewalk is less than 2m wide should be a slow street for COVID-19 physical distancing.
so, Oak St, Granville St, Knight Street, etc.

that doesn't sound like that'll work.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4647  
Old Posted May 27, 2020, 10:05 PM
scottN scottN is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by aberdeen5698 View Post
The city has been signing all of the residential streets with bike routes at 30 km/h for quite some time now.
The new "slow streets" allow pedestrians to use the street to maintain physical distancing. That's a big difference from lowering the rarely enforced speed limit from 50 to 30. Many people would not feel safe walking or running in the street with cars passing at 30 km/h.

The rules for slow street prohibit motor vehicles from passing, so the speed limit is effectively about 5 km/h. In a car, that's painfully slow.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4648  
Old Posted May 27, 2020, 10:20 PM
scottN scottN is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by VancouverOfTheFuture View Post
so, Oak St, Granville St, Knight Street, etc.

that doesn't sound like that'll work.
You're right that slow streets won't work in these cases. However many cities around the world have blocked off 1 or 2 lanes to increase the widths of sidewalks in busy areas to make room for physical distancing, especially where there are queues outside of stores. It's the same idea, just applied in a different way that is more sensitive to the context of an arterial street. Pedestrians need more room for social distancing and lane closures are another way to achieve that.

On Commercial Drive there are already 2 such queuing areas where parking has been blocked off - for Donald's grocery store and the Liquor store. IMO they should turn the curb lane into a temporary pedestrian sidewalk for the entire commercial district from 14th avenue to Hastings.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4649  
Old Posted May 27, 2020, 10:29 PM
s211 s211 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: The People's Glorious Republic of ... Sigh...
Posts: 6,515
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottN View Post
The rules for slow street prohibit motor vehicles from passing
I was not aware of that.

That sounds more like glacial streets than slow streets.
__________________
If it seems I'm ignoring what you may have written in response to something I have written, it's very likely that you're on my Ignore List. Please do not take it personally.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4650  
Old Posted May 27, 2020, 10:32 PM
s211 s211 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: The People's Glorious Republic of ... Sigh...
Posts: 6,515
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottN View Post
On Commercial Drive there are already 2 such queuing areas where parking has been blocked off - for Donald's grocery store and the Liquor store. IMO they should turn the curb lane into a temporary pedestrian sidewalk for the entire commercial district from 14th avenue to Hastings.
I imagine the suffering retailers and food outlets might have something to say about that.
__________________
If it seems I'm ignoring what you may have written in response to something I have written, it's very likely that you're on my Ignore List. Please do not take it personally.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4651  
Old Posted May 29, 2020, 6:45 PM
officedweller officedweller is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 31,360
Pics by me yesterday May 28th of the northerly section of the Richards St. bike lane:

From Pender looking south:



Looks like they have 2 lanes marked southbound
(one used for parking in off-rush hours (?)):


Will these be dug up for trees?
there's a drainage cut in the curb.


At Dunsmuir:




What are these cells for (conduit? or tree roots?)?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4652  
Old Posted May 29, 2020, 7:24 PM
WarrenC12 WarrenC12 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: East OV!
Posts: 13,173
Quote:
Originally Posted by officedweller View Post
Will these be dug up for trees?
there's a drainage cut in the curb.
Thanks for the pics! I really like the bioswale design of the newer bike lane along Quebec St. Maybe this isn't the right place for it, but I'd love to see more of that.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4653  
Old Posted May 29, 2020, 8:16 PM
idunno idunno is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 491
North of Dunsmuir, the Richards Street project is being completed to a 'temporary' design standard with the cast in place concrete pads and bike lane that is flush to the pavement. I would compare this standard to the one-way Nelson bike lane, or even most of Dunsmuir.

South of Dunsmuir, the project is more of a full reconstruction, with the advanced green infrastructure cells and a raised, separated bike lane. I would compare this to Quebec Street, but I believe this is one of (if not the first) implementations of GI with protected bike lanes downtown.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4654  
Old Posted May 31, 2020, 4:11 AM
Aroundtheworld Aroundtheworld is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 516
What's next after Richards downtown?

I believe there is the Drake bike lane which has already been designed. I would imagine the next priorities after that would be something along Water St. and then extending the Nelson and Smithe lanes up to Hornby.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4655  
Old Posted May 31, 2020, 2:41 PM
scottN scottN is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by s211 View Post
I was not aware of that.

That sounds more like glacial streets than slow streets.
Here's the CoV poster about how to drive on slow streets:

https://vancouver.ca/files/cov/slow-streets-poster.pdf
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4656  
Old Posted May 31, 2020, 7:19 PM
VancouverOfTheFuture's Avatar
VancouverOfTheFuture VancouverOfTheFuture is offline
Vancouverite
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posts: 2,058
avoid passing people walking? good luck with that.

when making these "policies" or whatever they are. shouldn't they have to take into consideration what is realistic, like in the real world? because, come on, that isn't going to happen; this isn't fantasy land.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4657  
Old Posted Jun 1, 2020, 4:02 AM
Conrad Yablonski Conrad Yablonski is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 496
Quote:
Originally Posted by VancouverOfTheFuture View Post
avoid passing people walking? good luck with that. when making these "policies" or whatever they are. shouldn't they have to take into consideration what is realistic, like in the real world? because, come on, that isn't going to happen; this isn't fantasy land.
Remember this is CoV staff at 'work' here creating their little fantasy worlds at taxpayers expense.

Reminds of when I called 311 asking for some info on an upcoming road project the employee I talked to couldn't help me because as he proudly pointed out he didn't drive/took the bus to work and referred me to the CoV website-which itself directed me to 'call 311 for more info'.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4658  
Old Posted Jun 2, 2020, 5:12 AM
scottN scottN is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by VancouverOfTheFuture View Post
avoid passing people walking? good luck with that.

when making these "policies" or whatever they are. shouldn't they have to take into consideration what is realistic, like in the real world? because, come on, that isn't going to happen; this isn't fantasy land.
Not all streets are thoroughfares. Lakewood already has regular traffic diverters for must of it's length. The street I live on isn't wide enough for a car to pass a pedestrian or cyclist (without taking advantage of rare empty parking spaces so a slow street would work just fine. What's also totally unrealistic is that such streets allow 2 way motor vehicle traffic at all. Before COVID-19, about once a week there would be a major traffic jam with multiple vehicles going east trying to pass multiple vehicles going west with an insufficient number of empty parking spaces to actually make it happen and drivers screaming at eachother about who should back up.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4659  
Old Posted Jun 2, 2020, 6:01 PM
fredinno's Avatar
fredinno fredinno is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Langley, BC
Posts: 1,653
I actually don't really want these slow streets to stay permanent. Excessively wide sidewalks feel more desolate, like Broadway.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4660  
Old Posted Jun 2, 2020, 6:41 PM
GenWhy? GenWhy? is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 1,157
Quote:
Originally Posted by fredinno View Post
I actually don't really want these slow streets to stay permanent. Excessively wide sidewalks feel more desolate, like Broadway.
"Slow Streets" is on local roads while widening sidewalk space to physical distance and allow outdoor patios are in pedestrian and shopping/restaurant heavy areas, unlike Broadway.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada > Alberta & British Columbia > Vancouver > Transportation & Infrastructure
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 1:39 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.