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  #1021  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2018, 6:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
what the hell is a tree lawn?

are you talking about parkways?

You mean a boulevard.
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  #1022  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2018, 7:42 PM
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I appreciate the perspectives shared on this thread from people throughout the greater region. Good topic, that has covered a lot of ground.

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  #1023  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 1:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Centropolis View Post
cleveland is 100% a midwestern feeling city from my experience/visits/etc. nothing about it orients it towards the east coast more than any number of other midwestern cities with guilded age (or earlier) and/or east coast money built institutions/amenities/etc in my opinion.
Curious what it means in the broader sense for a city to feel midwestern - is there a midwest vibe? Are you referring more to the layout and vernacular?
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  #1024  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 2:47 AM
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Originally Posted by shappy View Post
Curious what it means in the broader sense for a city to feel midwestern - is there a midwest vibe? Are you referring more to the layout and vernacular?
yeah, kind of. midwestern cities often have wide, big boned downtowns...often the cities feel like they were laid out for thousands, if not millions more people than are there...even chicago. broad expanses of big infrastructure, huge swaths of industrial or logistics, big guilded age projects like parks, blvds, endless blocks of middle class built homes in the city and suburbs. there is definitely a kind of pan-midwesternism, although regional differences between the lake, river, and prairie cities exist with regards to vernacular. it’s not a place where people complain about there “being too many damned people,” like you hear in say california or increasing the southeast. you can feel the contrast when you leave the midwest and are in a city like nashville, and somehow, suddenly, the city feels improbably cramped with cars and close-in suburbs. i’ve felt the same thing in austin.
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Last edited by Centropolis; Feb 21, 2018 at 3:01 AM.
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  #1025  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 2:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Centropolis View Post
yeah, kind of. midwestern cities often have wide, big boned downtowns...often the cities feel like they were laid out for thousands, if not millions more people than are there...even chicago. broad expanses of big infrastructure, huge swaths of industrial or logistics, big guilded age projects like parks, blvds, endless blocks of middle class built homes in the city and suburbs. there is definitely a kind of pan-midwesternism, although regional differences between the lake, river, and prairie cities exist with regards to vernacular. it’s not a place where people complain about there “being too many damned people,” like you hear in say california or increasing the southeast. you can feel the contrast when you leave the midwest and are in a city like nashville, and somehow, suddenly, the city feels improbably cramped with cars and close-in suburbs. i’ve felt the same thing in austin.
Ok yeah, I get that thanks. I was perusing on streetview and came across this: https://goo.gl/maps/oYcxxMcNCsr

An impressive building but with little else around. Pretty fascinating with the scale being so off balance. Mind you, perhaps a lot was torn down? In any case, sort of inline with your point about building more than required.
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  #1026  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 3:11 PM
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That's St. Colman Church - more info at: https://clevelandhistorical.org/items/show/185
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  #1027  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 3:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Centropolis View Post
yeah, kind of. midwestern cities often have wide, big boned downtowns...often the cities feel like they were laid out for thousands, if not millions more people than are there...even chicago. broad expanses of big infrastructure, huge swaths of industrial or logistics, big guilded age projects like parks, blvds, endless blocks of middle class built homes in the city and suburbs. there is definitely a kind of pan-midwesternism, although regional differences between the lake, river, and prairie cities exist with regards to vernacular. it’s not a place where people complain about there “being too many damned people,” like you hear in say california or increasing the southeast. you can feel the contrast when you leave the midwest and are in a city like nashville, and somehow, suddenly, the city feels improbably cramped with cars and close-in suburbs. i’ve felt the same thing in austin.

And that's where Toronto (and Hamilton and most of the rest of the Canadian side) really stands apart from the American side of the Great Lakes. For better or worse, it doesn't have any of that gilded age monumentalism. Things are haphazard, ramshackle, and tightly spaced, with, as you wonderfully put it earlier - a bunch of "spaceships" plopped down around town. Toronto was built for far fewer people than actually live here now. The whole civic trajectory of the place has basically been an accident from the start.

I think just by virtue of the Great Lakes being a trans-national region from a time when each side of the border had more palpable economic, demographic, and cultural differences will kind of invalidate the whole premise that the Great Lakes region is the one with the most uniform appearance.
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  #1028  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 4:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Centropolis View Post
yeah, kind of. midwestern cities often have wide, big boned downtowns...often the cities feel like they were laid out for thousands, if not millions more people than are there...even chicago. broad expanses of big infrastructure, huge swaths of industrial or logistics, big guilded age projects like parks, blvds, endless blocks of middle class built homes in the city and suburbs. there is definitely a kind of pan-midwesternism, although regional differences between the lake, river, and prairie cities exist with regards to vernacular. it’s not a place where people complain about there “being too many damned people,” like you hear in say california or increasing the southeast. you can feel the contrast when you leave the midwest and are in a city like nashville, and somehow, suddenly, the city feels improbably cramped with cars and close-in suburbs. i’ve felt the same thing in austin.
By those standards, Pittsburgh is certainly not a Midwestern city, given the combination of the crazy topography, dense built form, and the relatively low levels of urban blight make most of the cities more famous neighborhoods feel very structurally dense.
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  #1029  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 4:43 PM
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
By those standards, Pittsburgh is certainly not a Midwestern city, given the combination of the crazy topography, dense built form, and the relatively low levels of urban blight make most of the cities more famous neighborhoods feel very structurally dense.
Pittsburgh is its own thing due its unique geography.
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  #1030  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 5:27 PM
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Originally Posted by JManc View Post
Pittsburgh is its own thing due its unique geography.
Since Pittsburgh is not a midwestern city, would it fall into the same region as Charleston, WV? Pittsburgh being the dominate city by far.

They are only a 3 hour car ride away from each other.
Similar topography, tree covered hills, blue collar history - steelers vs. miners
Both cities are at the confluence of rivers, both cities have declined in population since 1960 due to having similar economies up until recently.
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  #1031  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 5:41 PM
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Originally Posted by JManc View Post
Pittsburgh is its own thing due its unique geography.
I wouldn't say Pittsburgh is its own thing really... just the largest, most urban representation of northeastern Appalachia.

Smaller cities in the greater region and steel towns up and down the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio rivers are mini-Pittsburghs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt View Post
Since Pittsburgh is not a midwestern city, would it fall into the same region as Charleston, WV? Pittsburgh being the dominate city by far.

They are only a 3 hour car ride away from each other.
Similar topography, tree covered hills, blue collar history - steelers vs. miners
Both cities are at the confluence of rivers, both cities have declined in population since 1960 due to having similar economies up until recently.
Same general region, sure. Hilly, industrial river cities in this area of the country share many of the same characteristics.

And the greater Pittsburgh region is just as much miners as it is steelers. They go together
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  #1032  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 5:52 PM
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Originally Posted by pj3000 View Post
I wouldn't say Pittsburgh is its own thing really... just the largest, most urban representation of northeastern Appalachia.

Smaller cities in the greater region and steel towns up and down the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio rivers are mini-Pittsburghs
Sure. I was thinking in context of major cities...Pittsburgh is in a league of its own. Wheeling is a mini-me Pittsburgh..just beat up and a fraction of the size. Has good bones and hope one day it can turn around.
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  #1033  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 5:54 PM
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Originally Posted by MonkeyRonin View Post
And that's where Toronto (and Hamilton and most of the rest of the Canadian side) really stands apart from the American side of the Great Lakes. For better or worse, it doesn't have any of that gilded age monumentalism.
Winnipeg (Canada's "gateway to the west") comes closer to the "monumentalism" of the cities of the US Midwest.
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  #1034  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 6:06 PM
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Originally Posted by JManc View Post
Sure. I was thinking in context of major cities...Pittsburgh is in a league of its own. Wheeling is a mini-me Pittsburgh..just beat up and a fraction of the size. Has good bones and hope one day it can turn around.
Got it. Yeah, Wheeling is a cool smaller city. Like you say, good bones. It seems like there are some good things going on there. Johnstown and Cumberland are other Pittsburgh mini-mes in a way, but they're both really depressed... Johnstown really falling apart in its core... going to be tough to ever come back. Both can be pretty creepy.
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  #1035  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 6:07 PM
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What is this midwestern "monumentalism" that is being talked about?
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  #1036  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 6:30 PM
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^Oversized neoclassical architecture:

Cleveland:











Indianapolis:







Chicago:





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  #1037  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 6:43 PM
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^All of those buildings and structures are awesome because that would not be built in today's world.
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  #1038  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 6:44 PM
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^ Cleveland has some amazing and underappreciated architecture. I love that art deco thingie on that bridge...
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  #1039  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 7:43 PM
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One of eight 'Guardians of Transportation' - four bridge pylons, each containing two Guardians (one faces west, one faces east) which hold eight different vehicles. See the door sized cutout at the base? That was originally supposed to be the entrance to a subway line (tracks were built and still exist below the roadway but never used).

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  #1040  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2018, 7:59 PM
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Originally Posted by MayDay View Post
^Oversized neoclassical architecture:
Ok, I didn't realize that was a Midwestern thing though. I mean, I've never heard that the big monumental architecture/design of the Progressive era was somehow identified as a Midwestern attribute.
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