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  #181  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2021, 7:46 PM
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This is probably the US in 20-30 years:

As birth rates fall, animals prowl in our abandoned 'ghost villages'
Human populations are set to decline in countries from Asia to Europe – and an unusual form of rewilding is taking place
https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...ghost-villages


Of course this already happened 100 years ago in large parts of the West (especially Nevada!), due to transient mining settlements.
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  #182  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2021, 8:35 PM
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Originally Posted by pj3000 View Post
So it's weird that I would have zero interest in living in any of these cities:

Columbus: +11.5%
Indianapolis: +9.8%
Minneapolis: +9.2%
Grand Rapids: +8.4%
Kansas City: +7.4%


And yet I'm attracted to all of these cities in varying degrees:

Milwaukee: +1.2%
Detroit: +0.5%
St Louis: +0.5%
Chicago: -0.03%
Buffalo: -0.6%
Rochester: -0.9%
Cleveland: -1.3%
Pittsburgh: -1.6%
Grand Rapids is actually pretty great. It has a very impressive historical downtown for a city it's size. It's like 30 minutes from sand dunes and lake Michigan and a national forest. I think it deserves the growth.

I like Minneapolis and get why people like it, but I think it's over-hyped and put too much on a pedestal at least compared to the rest of the Midwest. Still glad to see it growing though especially since it's a glaring contradiction to the "nobody wants to live in a cold winter city" narrative. I wouldn't mind living there but not long term.

Indianapolis is the definition of mediocre and it's growth is very bizarre to me, is there an industry or certain demographics I don't know about that is driving it? I think that by FAR it has the least to offer out of all the Midwest cities. I don't want to bring it down but everything people complain about with the Midwest, Indianapolis has amplified by like 10X. Indianapolis also has lots of crime so it's not like it has some perceived safety over other cities either.
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  #183  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2021, 9:00 PM
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Grand Rapids is actually pretty great. It has a very impressive historical downtown for a city it's size. It's like 30 minutes from sand dunes and lake Michigan and a national forest. I think it deserves the growth.

I like Minneapolis and get why people like it, but I think it's over-hyped and put too much on a pedestal at least compared to the rest of the Midwest. Still glad to see it growing though especially since it's a glaring contradiction to the "nobody wants to live in a cold winter city" narrative. I wouldn't mind living there but not long term.

Indianapolis is the definition of mediocre and it's growth is very bizarre to me, is there an industry or certain demographics I don't know about that is driving it? I think that by FAR it has the least to offer out of all the Midwest cities. I don't want to bring it down but everything people complain about with the Midwest, Indianapolis has amplified by like 10X. Indianapolis also has lots of crime so it's not like it has some perceived safety over other cities either.
Yeah, I'm not saying that any of them are bad places or anything, just location-wise not really my cup of tea.

I like Minneapolis and Columbus. Only been to Indianapolis once, didn't really appeal to me, but I don't think I have an informed opinion about it, since my visit was basically only a couple days. Never been to Kansas City or Cedar Rapids. The setting of Cedar Rapids sounds pretty nice.
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  #184  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2021, 9:10 PM
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I'm sure you're well aware, but I'll point it out since it's a less-considered potential effect of warming trends.

The less/lack of winter ice factor is becoming a big problem for erosion of the shorelines of the Lakes. Many areas are taking major beatings from wave action driven by winter storms, which otherwise wouldn't happen due to being iced over. It's normal to have a sporadic warm winter where the Lakes won't freeze over (particularly along the shorelines), but when the non-freezing over events become an annual occurence, then it becomes quite damaging. The economic effects resulting from infrastructure damage along the shorelines are staggering... potentially hundreds of trillions of dollars in direct costs.
The costs that will have to be dealt with in the great lakes will be about 0.00001% of the costs for the oceanic coasts.

It is REALLY time to kill off taxpayer funded flood insurance. Waaay too many people with their hands out.
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  #185  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2021, 10:23 PM
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Originally Posted by SIGSEGV View Post
This is probably the US in 20-30 years:

As birth rates fall, animals prowl in our abandoned 'ghost villages'
Human populations are set to decline in countries from Asia to Europe – and an unusual form of rewilding is taking place
https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...ghost-villages


Of course this already happened 100 years ago in large parts of the West (especially Nevada!), due to transient mining settlements.
The US has already a problem with wild animals on urban settings. With population shrinking, it will become even more common.
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  #186  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 12:11 AM
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Don't know if I'd call wildlife returning a 'problem' but nature balancing itself out. I think people should learn to live with wildlife in urban areas rather than see them as a nuisance. We have coyotes, eagles, bob cats and deer all around our neighborhood and we adapt.
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  #187  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 12:13 AM
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Don't know if I'd call wildlife returning a 'problem' but nature balancing itself out. I think people should learn to live with wildlife in urban areas rather than see them as a nuisance. We have coyotes, eagles, bob cats and deer all around our neighborhood and we adapt.
Those animals are all fine (though Coyotes might interact poorly with pets). Mountain Lions and bears are a bit more dangerous.
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  #188  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 12:16 AM
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I think Buffalo, Cleveland, and Pittsburgh MSAs' median age are all 40+

And I think all three are near 20% 65+

i dk where you got that or what is actually correct, but what i posted came right up on google for median ages.
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  #189  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 12:27 AM
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Don't know if I'd call wildlife returning a 'problem' but nature balancing itself out. I think people should learn to live with wildlife in urban areas rather than see them as a nuisance. We have coyotes, eagles, bob cats and deer all around our neighborhood and we adapt.
I guess that's due the nature of US sprawl that put people closer to wildlife whereas the low dense environment is easier for animals to adapt.

With the population decline, local authorities should work on downsizing, returning abandoned areas to the nature as soon as possible instead of leaving it decaying little by little. I heard Detroit was quite efficient on doing so.
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  #190  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 12:43 AM
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Originally Posted by pj3000 View Post
Yeah, I'm not saying that any of them are bad places or anything, just location-wise not really my cup of tea.

I like Minneapolis and Columbus. Only been to Indianapolis once, didn't really appeal to me, but I don't think I have an informed opinion about it, since my visit was basically only a couple days. Never been to Kansas City or Cedar Rapids. The setting of Cedar Rapids sounds pretty nice.
Kansas City is great if you're into Art Deco architecture. It's also hillier than most people expect.
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  #191  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 1:07 AM
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Atlanta looks a lot like Denver.
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  #192  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 1:13 AM
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Never been to Kansas City or Cedar Rapids. The setting of Cedar Rapids sounds pretty nice.
we've been talking about Grand Rapids in this thread, not Cedar Rapids.

Grand Rapids is an MSA of 1,077,370 people in west central Michigan, about 25 miles inland from the lake michigan shore.

Cedar Rapids is relatively small MSA of 273,032 people in east central Iowa.
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  #193  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 1:24 AM
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^ oh sorry. Yeah, I do know the difference... it’s just one of those mental blocks I have. A friend’s father is from Cedar Rapids, and for some reason (probably too much weed) I always swap Grand with Cedar.
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  #194  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 1:25 AM
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i dk where you got that or what is actually correct, but what i posted came right up on google for median ages.
Are you sure you’re looking at MSA?
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  #195  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 1:31 AM
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^ oh sorry. Yeah, I do know the difference... it’s just one of those mental blocks I have. A friend’s father is from Cedar Rapids, and for some reason (probably too much weed) I always swap Grand with Cedar.
it's all good.

i was just clarifying because Grand Rapids might just be the most low-profile 1M+ MSA in the nation.

it's a relatively new member of that particular club, so that's probably a big part of it.
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  #196  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 3:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Reverberation View Post
Atlanta looks a lot like Denver.
Huh? The cities are nothing alike in any metric
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  #197  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 4:05 AM
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Are you sure you’re looking at MSA?

it was cities, i dc about burbia.
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  #198  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 4:07 AM
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Originally Posted by The North One View Post
Grand Rapids is actually pretty great. It has a very impressive historical downtown for a city it's size. It's like 30 minutes from sand dunes and lake Michigan and a national forest. I think it deserves the growth.

I like Minneapolis and get why people like it, but I think it's over-hyped and put too much on a pedestal at least compared to the rest of the Midwest. Still glad to see it growing though especially since it's a glaring contradiction to the "nobody wants to live in a cold winter city" narrative. I wouldn't mind living there but not long term.

Indianapolis is the definition of mediocre and it's growth is very bizarre to me, is there an industry or certain demographics I don't know about that is driving it? I think that by FAR it has the least to offer out of all the Midwest cities. I don't want to bring it down but everything people complain about with the Midwest, Indianapolis has amplified by like 10X. Indianapolis also has lots of crime so it's not like it has some perceived safety over other cities either.

what are you like the grim reaper? yeesh!

https://www.cnn.com/2021/01/24/us/in...rnd/index.html
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  #199  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 12:27 PM
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GR is actually pretty similar to Indy, just much smaller.

Both are somewhat conservative-leaning "newer" Midwest metros. Both heavily Protestant for the Midwest. Both are kinda generic and sprawly.
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  #200  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 2:37 PM
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GR is actually pretty similar to Indy, just much smaller.

Both are somewhat conservative-leaning "newer" Midwest metros. Both heavily Protestant for the Midwest. Both are kinda generic and sprawly.
It's weird how cities that grow in the Midwest are the most generic, without any or little urban appeal. They are growing at Sunbelt rates while their more attractive neighbours are either stagnant or declining.

Columbus
2000 --- 1,581,066 --- 14.78%
2010 --- 1,801,709 --- 13.96%
2019 --- 2,022,545 --- 12.26%

Indianapolis
2000 --- 1,607,486 --- 16.44%
2010 --- 1,834,672 --- 14.13%
2019 --- 2,021,869 --- 10.20%

Grand Rapids
2000 ----- 935,393 --- 17.15%
2010 ----- 993,670 ---- 6.23%
2019 --- 1,077,370 ---- 8.42%

Des Moines
2000 ---- 456,022 --- 16.06%
2010 ---- 543,027 --- 19.08%
2019 ---- 635,080 --- 16.95%
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