HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #781  
Old Posted Oct 29, 2019, 9:32 PM
Andy6's Avatar
Andy6 Andy6 is offline
Starring as himself
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Toronto Yorkville
Posts: 9,111
Quote:
Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
One cute one... occasionally, when the British press covers us, they often tilt the map as strongly as our own local weather forecasts do.


https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...dland-labrador

It's still not fully accurate (our actual southernmost point is still tilted nearly enough to be the easternmost on this map), but much better than Canadian media does.
No flat map can ever “fully accurately” represent the surface of a spheroid. No matter what you do, something has to be sacrificed - relative distances, relative areas, landmass shapes, directions, or some combination thereof.
__________________
crispy crunchy light and snappy
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #782  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2019, 3:11 AM
Chadillaccc's Avatar
Chadillaccc Chadillaccc is offline
ARTchitecture
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Cold Garden
Posts: 21,412
I'm taking Geospatial Communication Methods right now, and that comment just made me sigh and lay own I can't wait to be done. Love looking at maps, apparently hate making them.
__________________
Strong & free

'Hate is a burden, you don’t need to carry it with you.' — Annushka Volovodov
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #783  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2019, 3:21 AM
vid's Avatar
vid vid is offline
Editor
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Thunder Bay
Posts: 40,876
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chadillaccc View Post
I'm taking Geospatial Communication Methods right now, and that comment just made me sigh and lay own I can't wait to be done. Love looking at maps, apparently hate making them.
Hand drawing? Yup. GIS application data input? Nope.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #784  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2019, 3:26 AM
Loco101's Avatar
Loco101 Loco101 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Timmins, Northern Ontario
Posts: 4,112
I like going on this website to look at old maps for pretty much anywhere in the world:

https://www.oldmapsonline.org/

For where I live, I enjoy seeing many of the Indigenous names of the lakes (as interpreted by whoever drew the maps) and how much exploration was done.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #785  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2019, 3:37 AM
Chadillaccc's Avatar
Chadillaccc Chadillaccc is offline
ARTchitecture
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Cold Garden
Posts: 21,412
Quote:
Originally Posted by vid View Post
Hand drawing? Yup. GIS application data input? Nope.
EXACTLY! *shameful tears*
__________________
Strong & free

'Hate is a burden, you don’t need to carry it with you.' — Annushka Volovodov
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #786  
Old Posted Dec 14, 2019, 5:00 PM
MonctonRad's Avatar
MonctonRad MonctonRad is online now
Wildcats Rule!!
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Moncton NB
Posts: 21,784
Interesting graphic showing urban heat islands in the northeast (including southern parts of Ontario).

__________________
Go 'Cats Go
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #787  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 8:58 PM
isaidso isaidso is offline
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 9,878
As a point of reference, the northern edge of downtown is currently just north of Bloor near Dupont. The current system downtown is much smaller/far less extensive. I'd love to see streetcars return to Bay, Church, and Parliament. Perhaps a few others.




https://www.blogto.com/city/2019/02/...cars-map-1932/
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams

Last edited by isaidso; Apr 10, 2020 at 11:40 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #788  
Old Posted May 29, 2020, 2:29 PM
J.OT13's Avatar
J.OT13 J.OT13 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 11,203
Ottawa's 1929 streetcar network.



https://www.maproomblog.com/tag/ottawa/

vs the current map (minus a few minor changes).


https://www.westsideaction.ca/new-co...ra-bus-routes/
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #789  
Old Posted May 29, 2020, 5:38 PM
MolsonExport's Avatar
MolsonExport MolsonExport is online now
The Vomit Bag.
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: The Tropic of Sir Galahad
Posts: 33,229

transitmap

back (1941) when Montreal wooted supreme.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #790  
Old Posted May 29, 2020, 5:40 PM
MolsonExport's Avatar
MolsonExport MolsonExport is online now
The Vomit Bag.
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: The Tropic of Sir Galahad
Posts: 33,229
Montreal Woot is back

REM

Pretty impressive for stagnant, landlocked Montreal.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #791  
Old Posted Jun 2, 2020, 2:49 PM
MonkeyRonin's Avatar
MonkeyRonin MonkeyRonin is online now
¥ ¥ ¥
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 7,599
Thought this was interesting. Conceptual plans for Resolute Bay from architect Ralph Erskine in 1970:













https://www.instagram.com/marie_passa/?hl=en



The actual town today:


https://www.instagram.com/marie_passa/?hl=en


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:V...lute_bay_4.jpg
__________________
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #792  
Old Posted Jun 2, 2020, 2:58 PM
niwell's Avatar
niwell niwell is online now
sick transit, gloria
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Brockton Village, Toronto
Posts: 8,902
^That's fascinating! Would love to have seen some more thought put into the design of our Arctic communities. IIRC there's a place in the north of Quebec that uses an apartment block as a sort of wind shield, I remember reading a VICE article about it longggg ago.
__________________
Check out my pics of Johannesburg
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #793  
Old Posted Jun 2, 2020, 3:37 PM
MonkeyRonin's Avatar
MonkeyRonin MonkeyRonin is online now
¥ ¥ ¥
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 7,599
Quote:
Originally Posted by niwell View Post
^That's fascinating! Would love to have seen some more thought put into the design of our Arctic communities. IIRC there's a place in the north of Quebec that uses an apartment block as a sort of wind shield, I remember reading a VICE article about it longggg ago.

Fermont!



https://www.houseporn.ca/landscape/a...fermont_quebec
__________________
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #794  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2020, 7:04 PM
SaskScraper's Avatar
SaskScraper SaskScraper is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Saskatoon/London
Posts: 2,253
^ Who knew

never heard of Fremont, Quebec but the design of the town makes sense.

"The town is notable for the huge self-contained structure containing apartments, stores, schools, bars, a hotel, restaurants, a supermarket and swimming pool which shelters a community of smaller apartment buildings and homes on its leeward side. The structure was designed to be a windscreen to the rest of the town. It permits residents (other than mine workers) to never leave the building during the long winter, which usually lasts about seven months."




Some interesting maps I just found on Reddit.




Even though Saskatchewan's image to the rest of Canadians is of featureless flat Prairie as far as the eye can see...

But boy does Saskie have lakes!

2 of the top 25 largest in the World.

Reply With Quote
     
     
  #795  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2020, 7:19 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 29,263
"Iron Mount", because it's an iron mining town; nothing to do with California explorer John Fremont.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #796  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2020, 7:21 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 29,263
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaskScraper View Post
^ Who knew

never heard of Fremont, Quebec but the design of the town makes sense.

"The town is notable for the huge self-contained structure containing apartments, stores, schools, bars, a hotel, restaurants, a supermarket and swimming pool which shelters a community of smaller apartment buildings and homes on its leeward side. The structure was designed to be a windscreen to the rest of the town. It permits residents (other than mine workers) to never leave the building during the long winter, which usually lasts about seven months."
Do you know where the fuck this town is? It's in remote Northern Quebec. That's like me using Uranium City weather data for "Saskatchewan" (and bolding it).

By the way, it was +16C in Maple Creek (colder than Alaska!) when I was there a few days ago.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #797  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2020, 8:54 PM
Maldive Maldive is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 1,094
That Top 25 Lakes really underscores why Trump is secretly mobilizing his (funded by SoCal) plans to take us down. Someone somewhere said something about the next great war will be fought over the most important resource on the planet. Details at Wet-ops.com....
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #798  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2020, 9:00 PM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is online now
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 24,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maldive View Post
That Top 25 Lakes really underscores why Trump is secretly mobilizing his (funded by SoCal) plans to take us down. Someone somewhere said something about the next great war will be fought over the most important resource on the planet. details at Wet-ops.com..
I think it would be silly for most major countries to fight a great war over water when most of them have access to the ocean. Poor landlocked desert areas may fight over water.

How much sea water could you desalinate for the price of an Iraq War, which is just a minor war? You could get terawatts of nuclear power generating capacity, build aqueducts wherever, and make a new great lake if you felt like it (also, some of those lakes have high salinity).

Meanwhile a large scale fusion generator is under construction in Europe. I am guessing that power will be extremely cheap in 50 years as long as countries like the United States make even semi-sensible decisions (so I guess it's far from in the bag...).
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #799  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2020, 9:24 PM
wave46 wave46 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 3,056
Quote:
Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
I think it would be silly for most major countries to fight a great war over water when most of them have access to the ocean. Poor landlocked desert areas may fight over water.

How much sea water could you desalinate for the price of an Iraq War, which is just a minor war? You could get terawatts of nuclear power generating capacity, build aqueducts wherever, and make a new great lake if you felt like it (also, some of those lakes have high salinity).

Meanwhile a large scale fusion generator is under construction in Europe. I am guessing that power will be extremely cheap in 50 years as long as countries like the United States make even semi-sensible decisions (so I guess it's far from in the bag...).
This is the argument I've always had. I was also uncertain if he was posting tongue-in-cheek or not.

The problem with water is that it's heavy and you need lots of it in industrial countries. Considering that the Earth is 70% water and a desalinization plant runs a couple of billion dollars for a decently large city with a few million dollars of operating costs, it makes no sense to have a bonkers war nor some super-canal to push water against gravity for thousands of miles.

I think the number one user of water is irrigation, so maybe not irrigating the desert might be a wonderful idea if we wanted to save some water.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #800  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2020, 9:30 PM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is online now
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 24,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by wave46 View Post
I think the number one user of water is irrigation, so maybe not irrigating the desert might be a wonderful idea if we wanted to save some water.
In the future I believe a lot of food production will be in a factory-like setting where evaporation and humidity can be more easily controlled. We may still produce, say, wheat or corn in easily irrigated areas or places where rainfall means irrigation is not even needed. But there will not be much reason to try to eke out food production in marginal areas, aside from distribution problems. In fact this is probably already the case.

The world population will start to fall soon. In 2100, I don't think we will have "third world countries" as we understand them today.

African GDP growth. High growth in countries that are poster children for desertification (e.g. Chad):


Source



Power generation will mostly be nuclear, fission or fusion. Either the US and Europe will lead this or they'll go down the wrong path and China will. Either way humanity will have far greater energy resources at its disposal than today, and many applications of electrical power that seem too expensive today won't be.

Last edited by someone123; Jul 30, 2020 at 9:41 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:28 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.