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  #301  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2019, 12:44 AM
Jayday23 Jayday23 is offline
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I'm a little ticked that the Mayors always seem to join the meeting late or not at all. They fought for years to have a seat at the table and now that they do (without a vote), they take it for granted. Today's meeting more than any, they should both have been there (Pedneaud-Jobin is absent) and on time (Watson was late) considering this is Kristmanson's last meeting.
Totally agree. Its kinda disrespectful. I wonder if Watson's relationship with the NCC will change with Tobi now in the big seat...
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  #302  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2019, 3:59 PM
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The National District Commission

Looks like a satire of 70s capital planing.



https://ndc-cdn.com/
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  #303  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2019, 4:41 PM
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Originally Posted by J.OT13 View Post
The National District Commission

Looks like a satire of 70s capital planing.
Cool... The NDC/NCC HQ gets a prime chunk of real estate AND it's own airport!!

And I like the Hydrofoil... cross the river in 30 seconds instead of 2 minutes!!
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  #304  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2019, 4:46 PM
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The National District Commission

Looks like a satire of 70s capital planing.
To be clear, and just in case this is missed by others, the site says: "*This is a fictional account of an incredible, but unrealized program. It is documented here for your enjoyment and solely for entertainment purposes only."

It is in fact a satire of 70s capital planning - this is not an old NCC plan.
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  #305  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2019, 5:10 PM
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Ottawa's spring floods put last round of infrastructure repairs to the test

By: The Canadian Press
Published: Jun 5, 2019 3:57pm EDT


A new round of repairs is in store for pathways around Parliament Hill, after the second major flood in three years.

Water levels on the Ottawa River remain a metre above normal and crews working for the National Capital Commission are just beginning to assess the damage to infrastructure near the Ottawa River.

The Crown corporation responsible for federal land in the capital region spent about $6 million on repairs after the last flood, keeping some popular tourist paths closed for many months for extensive reconstruction.

Some repairs to pathways on the Quebec side of the river weren't finished by the time the second damaging flood came this spring.

"Cleanup has already begun, inspections have begun, so we're hoping to reopen them as soon as possible. We're hoping it's not going to take a year for these," said Dominique Huras, a spokesperson for the commission.

Some social-media images from a river pathway in Gatineau across from Parliament show warped and washed-out asphalt, which Huras said was from an incompletely repaired portion of the pathway.

She said artificial rock formations installed along the river to protect against erosion after flooding two years ago seem to have held, at least along that portion of the pathway. But the rocks may not be the key factor in determining how much repair the area will need.

"That's not the resilient part of it, it's the vegetation that's there that's supposed to absorb and protect," Huras said. "The problem is that vegetation takes about three to four years to sink its roots so that it won't get washed away."

The three stages of repairs and upgrades the NCC undertook on pathways near the river gives them an opportunity to see how their higher standards withstood this year's flooding, Huras said. The NCC will get to see how repairs and modifications completed in 2016 or 2017 fared versus more recent work.

Huras said any money needed for new fixes to projects that hadn't been completed will likely come out of the same pool of $55 million the federal government granted the commission in 2018 to repair and maintain major infrastructure, which included work on the previous year's flood damage. Repairing other damage will require money from other commission funds or new appropriations from the federal government.

Like authorities elsewhere, Huras said the commission is learning it can no longer treat extreme events like flooding as "exceptional."

"We're looking at the whole process as this will be a reoccurrence. We're not seeing it as a one-in-100-year flood any more," Huras said.

The president of an Ottawa cycling organization said Wednesday that she hopes the commission will get the capacity to plan for more extreme weather.

"These last couple of events have been extreme. I think it shows we aren't really resourcing the NCC sufficiently to keep up with the changing climate," said Heather Shearer.

She said the pathways are extremely popular with cyclists and others, and they bring "vibrancy" to the capital city.

"I think we've had a couple of exceptional years, but I am concerned that this is something we're going to see in the future and we have to be ready for it," Shearer said.

https://obj.ca/article/ottawas-sprin...e-repairs-test
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  #306  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2019, 11:43 AM
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Gov. Gen. Payette won't be moving into Rideau Hall for now
Her office had said she would move into the main residence this summer

Catharine Tunney · CBC News
Posted: Jul 03, 2019 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: 2 hours ago




Gov. Gen. Julie Payette won't be moving into Rideau Hall, the home and workplace of every viceregal going back to Confederation, until further notice, according to her office.

Since taking the job in October 2017, and while the main residence has been undergoing renovations, Payette has been staying in Rideau Gate, a two-storey house near Rideau Hall and 24 Sussex Drive that's usually reserved for visiting dignitaries.

The renovations to the private quarters finished in March 2018. Then, a new round of renovations began to make the building more accessible.

In November of last year, Payette's office told the Globe and Mail she would move into the official residence "in the summer of 2019."

However, that's no longer the plan.

Valérie Gervais, Payette's press secretary, said the Queen's representative is spending the summer at the Citadelle (another official residence in Quebec City) and won't be moving into Rideau Hall until further notice.

The Governor General's office is working with the National Capital Commission on a "long-range vision" plan for the official residence which addresses privacy concerns, said Gervais.

The plan, which was developed by the NCC and the former governor general's office, notes that the residence is a "less-than-private space for the vice-regal family" and promises to redesign the private quarters to give a "sense of privacy and intimacy."

Most of Rideau Hall's 95,000 square feet are reserved for state affairs, while about 5,000 square feet of that space is used exclusively by the Governor General.

Sources close to the file told CBC News they believe Payette has been reluctant to move because she prefers the privacy of Rideau Gate and doesn't like the idea of having staff and visitors walking in and out of Rideau Hall.

"Her excellency has agreed to stay in the government-owned quarters that she has been living in since October 2017, which are located within the Rideau Hall precinct," said Gervais in an email.

The delayed move into Rideau Hall has become a topic of criticism already. Media reports have raised questions about the appropriateness of the Governor General living at Rideau Gate.

The famously private former astronaut has battled media reports suggesting she's not a good fit for a job rooted in tradition and pomp — and has been forced to respond to questions about high turnover in her office and the frequency of her public events.

That media pressure led to a meeting last September between then-Privy Council Clerk Michael Wernick and the National Capital Commission, the federal body that oversees official residences, according to a briefing note obtained through access to information.

The topic of the meeting, which was attended by officials from Payette's office, was her "decision to not move into Rideau Hall for the foreseeable future."

Payette also has said on the record she was troubled by the lack of an emergency exit at Rideau Hall.

The NCC referred most of CBC News' questions to Payette's office, adding only that "there is no outstanding work required to be completed in the private quarters of Rideau Hall."

Rideau Hall's apartment isn't the only official residence sitting empty.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau decided not to move into 24 Sussex Drive — noted for its problems with asbestos and vermin — when he took office four years ago.

A 2018 report by the NCC found that Rideau Hall (which actually consists of more than 20 buildings and 175 rooms) is considered to be in "good" condition, while Rideau Gate is in "fair" condition.

The audit of the NCC's official residence portfolio concluded that 24 Sussex Drive and Harrington Lake, the prime minister's country residence, are both in "critical" condition — meaning they need "frequent emergency maintenance and repair."

The NCC has asked for $83 million over 10 years to fix up all six official residences.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/pay...move-1.5192368
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  #307  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2019, 1:34 AM
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Rideau Hall Maintenance and Storage Garage Building

The NCC is proposing to construct a new 417 m2 maintenance and storage garage building and a 760 m2 office building, on the site formerly occupied by an 1860's barn and various 1940's sheds and additions, in the operations zone at Rideau Hall.

The Operations Zone at Rideau Hall is located within a Federal Heritage Buildings Review Office “Classified” complex and a National Historic Site of Canada. Several structures within this zone have been independently designated by FHBRO, including the Stable Building dating back to Confederation and the Dome Building. Both these structures have been rehabilitated in recent years, and a contemporary addition accommodating an elevator was added to the Dome Building. In 2016 significant changes were made to the buildings in the Operations Zone. The 1860’s Barn building (formerly the NCC Site office) and a series of garage and shed structures were removed. The Dairy Building, a heritage designated structure was restored and relocated across the road to support the Rideau Hall Ice rink. The Chauffeur’s Garage also received a contemporary 3-storey addition in 2016.

Existing NCC accommodations in the Operations Zone are inadequate to properly support the functions of operations and maintenance staff. A shortage of appropriate and efficiently used space for administrative services, grounds operations, equipment storage, repair garages, workshops and change facilities has been identified. Currently, garage spaces are inadequately accommodated in a temporary dome structure in the Sugar Bush and offices are spread across the site in 5 different buildings.

Design of the Operations Zone facilities has undergone many iterations since the Project was initiated in 2013. The Project was presented to FHBRO and Reviews of Intervention Reports were submitted to the NCC. In the fall 2015, the Project was suspended following the Prime Minister’s move to Rideau Cottage which is located adjacent to the Operations Zone. Work was limited to planning, functional programming, civil

Proposed Plan:
http://ncc-website-2.s3.amazonaws.co...Zone-FLUDA.pdf

Aerial:
https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.44518.../data=!3m1!1e3

Details:





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  #308  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2020, 12:41 PM
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On his first anniversary in the job, NCC boss lays out three priorities
Despite budget constraints, the CEO says he's committed to enhancing the area's waterways, dealing with climate change, and making the commission more transparent.

Tobi Nussbaum
Updated: February 7, 2020


Had you asked me just over a year ago, before I started my current job, how many bridges the National Capital Commission owned, I would have estimated: between interprovincial bridges, the parkways and pathways, spans in Gatineau Park, Greenbelt stream crossings, I might have guessed 50.

A year later, I know the answer. The NCC owns 145 bridges — along with more than 1,000 buildings on 1,700 properties that make up 11 per cent of the National Capital Region and include some of its most ecologically valuable areas.

Learning about the vast scope of the NCC’s assets, and its work, has been one of the most interesting parts of the job. I’ve gained a new appreciation for the variety and complexity of the geography of Gatineau Park; the latest techniques in heritage conservation; how to make waterfront pathways more resilient when faced with extreme weather; issues involved in protecting the 20 species at risk that live in the Mer Bleue Bog. The list goes on.

The fact that the planning, conservation and stewardship of these assets are carried out with an annual capital budget of less than $24 million is a testament to the efficiency, professionalism and creative problem-solving skills of the NCC’s dedicated staff of just over 400 people. Yet, even with all this ingenuity to draw upon, the NCC still has to grapple every day with what has become its greatest corporate risk: the significant funding gap that prevents it from maintaining this asset base in the condition that Canadians expect.

While we work with the government of Canada on addressing our financial challenges, we continue to press ahead with an ambitious agenda in three distinct areas.

First, in continuing our efforts to build an even better capital, we need to face and embrace the capital’s magnificent waterways, and provide opportunities for everyone to enjoy them. We’re revitalizing Nepean Point, overlooking the Ottawa River and Parliament Hill, which offers one of the prime views of the Capital Region. We’re restoring and enhancing specific recreational nodes along the Ottawa River, piloting new bistros on our shorelines, and supporting winter recreation on our river pathways. A central component of the recently approved Master Concept Plan for LeBreton Flats is the community’s historic aqueducts and connections to the river.

Second, we are taking leadership in the area of sustainability and meeting the challenge of climate change. The NCC is one of only two Crown corporations to sign on to the Federal Sustainable Development Act, to contribute to meeting the federal government’s sustainability goals. And we recently adopted our own bold, sustainable development strategy which commits us to building a greener, more environmentally sensitive capital, through a series of actions in areas such as energy and water efficiency, green building construction, the promotion of active transportation, and more robust protection of our natural areas.

Third, we are working to be a more open and transparent partner in the nation’s capital, focused on corporate excellence. This year, we will be inaugurating a new event offering a day of guided tours and interaction throughout the capital to enable residents and visitors to learn more about us. Our commitment to public consultation and broadening our channels of communication continues. Internally, we are focused on staff engagement and leveraging our in-house talent — efforts that were acknowledged last week when the NCC was recognized as a top employer in the nation’s capital.

When I started this job a year ago, one thing I did know was that the assets the NCC owns and maintains are among Canada’s most important cultural and heritage sites. They include public symbols, commemorations and democratic institutions that are among our country’s most iconic images. As Canadians glide along the Rideau Canal Skateway, snap selfies with the Rideau Hall ceremonial guard, or ponder the thousands of years of Indigenous presence on the shorelines below Parliament Hill, they are not only enjoying the assets of the NCC, but also reflecting on our collective history and aspirations for the future as a nation.

Tobi Nussbaum is the CEO of the National Capital Commission.

https://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/co...ree-priorities
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  #309  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2020, 4:30 PM
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NCC temporarily closing vehicle access to Greenbelt, working to reopen pathways

Megan Gillis, Ottawa Citizen
Publishing date: 10 minutes ago • 1 minute read


In a move certain to disappoint dog walkers and hikers in the throes of cabin fever, the National Capital Commission is temporarily closing vehicle access to the Greenbelt encircling the capital.

As of 9 p.m. Friday, parking lots at trailheads and off-leash dog parks will be closed, which the commission says is consistent with its move to temporarily close Gatineau Park March 23.

“We recognize that this decision will affect residents’ enjoyment of the Greenbelt but we must make every effort to protect employees, contractors and trail users from COVID-19 and ensure compliance with public health directives from all levels of government, particularly the call to avoid all non-essential trips,” the NCC said in a statement Friday.

“We encourage everyone to enjoy the outdoors close to home – on foot or by bike – rather than driving to a destination further from home. Trail users arriving in a vehicle will be unable to park in the trailhead parking lots or on adjacent roadways.”
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Local authorities will enforce these parking prohibitions, the commission said.

People who live near a trailhead or dog park can still use them if they abide by public health recommendations about physical distancing.

Meanwhile, the NCC said it’s working on progressively reopening its multi-use pathways “as quickly as possible” by using heavy machinery to clear ice and snow “along with the help of Mother Nature.”

Check social media feeds for updates on pathways opening, the NCC said.

The NCC said it’s not considering closing either the Sir John A. Macdonald Parkway or the Sir George-Étienne Cartier Parkway to vehicles, despite an online petition asking it to make the parkways bike and pedestrian routes. The NCC cited the need for continued access for transit and emergency services along with its own “logistical challenges” and staffing.

The NCC will also reassess planned road closures, such as Sunday Bikedays, with public health officials and local municipalities.

https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local...-0b404e723546/
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  #310  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2020, 2:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Multi-modal View Post
To be clear, and just in case this is missed by others, the site says: "*This is a fictional account of an incredible, but unrealized program. It is documented here for your enjoyment and solely for entertainment purposes only."

It is in fact a satire of 70s capital planning - this is not an old NCC plan.
Dammit. I was looking forward to perambulating among the Pillars of Servitude.
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  #311  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2020, 4:44 PM
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NCC Board Meeting on Thursday. Proposed agenda includes:
  • Parliamentary Precinct Exterior Lighting Master Plan,
  • Library and Archives Canada/Ottawa Public Library Joint Facility,
  • Schematic Design for Asset and Workplace Renewal of Place du Portage III Complex – phase 1
  • Zibi Site – Pangishimo Park
  • National Monument to Canada’s Mission in Afghanistan
  • TriBro Studios Ottawa at the Greenbelt Research Farm
  • Nepean Point Redevelopment
  • Building LeBreton Project and Library Parcel Procurement Status

Full agenda can be found here:

https://ncc-website-2.s3.amazonaws.c...20200416161604
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  #312  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2020, 2:51 PM
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Due to the Covid-19 situation, the NCC board meeting will be held by teleconference and will not be broadcasted. The NCC has however published the presentations and materials online.

The NCC will be posting summaries for each topic (votes) at a later time.
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  #313  
Old Posted May 8, 2020, 4:58 PM
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Trudeau's Harrington Lake residence undergoing $8.6M renovation

Nicole Bogart, CTVNews.ca
@nlynnbogart

Published Friday, April 17, 2020 8:51PM EDT




TORONTO -- Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s lakeside residence, where he recently spent Easter with his wife and children, has been undergoing $8.6 million in renovations, the National Capital Commission (NCC) has confirmed.

Renovations at the Harrington Lake residence were prompted after a 2018 report determined that the prime minister’s summer getaway was in “critical condition” and in need of $17 million in repairs.

The federally designated heritage building, which is maintained by the NCC, has not seen any investment since 2005, according to a statement from an NCC spokesperson.

“While the Main Cottage is 95-years-old, most of the buildings were built between 1850 and 1925,” a spokesperson said via email Friday.

“It was 1950s -- over 60 years ago -- the last time major capital investments were made at Harrington Lake.”

Trudeau’s official country residence has been widely cited this week, after he garnered criticism for travelling to Harrington Lake over Easter despite having warned Canadians not to visit their own cottages amid the COVID-19 outbreak.

His wife, Sophie Trudeau, and children have been living at the residence for the past three weeks.

While Harrington Lake is only a 30-minute drive from the prime minister’s residence of Rideau Cottage in Ottawa, it’s located in neighbouring Quebec, which means Trudeau would have crossed provincial borders in order to visit his family.

In an effort to limit non-essential travel between Ottawa and Gatineau, Quebec police have turned some motorists away when they attempt to cross the provincial border.

Trudeau defended the decision to visit the residence in a press conference Tuesday, noting he continues to “follow all instructions from public health authorities.”

According to the NCC spokesperson, work on the $8.6-million renovation has been suspended due to COVID-19 directives.​

https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/trud...tion-1.4901730
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  #314  
Old Posted May 8, 2020, 4:59 PM
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Taxpayers spend $2.5-million for reconstruction of guest cottage at PM’s

Robert Fife, Ottawa Bureau Chief
Steven Chase
The Globe and Mail
Published May 7, 2020
Updated 3 hours ago




A federal agency relocated an abandoned and rundown building at the Prime Minister’s Harrington Lake retreat in Quebec’s Gatineau Hills and rebuilt it into a $2.5-million lakeside mansion for friends of prime ministers or visiting dignitaries.

The “Caretaker’s House” originally built in 1850, has been renamed the “Farmhouse,” and is currently being used by the Trudeau family while $6.1-million in restoration work is being done to the main cottage, a country home for Canadian prime ministers since the late 1950s.

Restoration of the 16-room main cottage, that sits on secluded Harrington Lake, has been suspended because of the COVID-19 outbreak, according to Jean Wolff, a spokesman for the National Capital Commission (NCC) that manages the government’s official residences in the capital region.

“The NCC has asked the Prime Minister to use the Farmhouse temporarily, pending completion of renovations at the main cottage. Once these renovations are complete, the Farmhouse will serve as a guest house,” Mr. Wolff said in an e-mail.

There is already another guest cottage on the 5.4-hectare property that is situated across the lake from the Prime Minister’s residence. During the Stephen Harper years, the guest cottage was used by then-governor-general Michaëlle Jean and her family.

Sources say the Caretaker’s House, which was originally located across a main road and lacked a view of Harrington Lake, had deteriorated to the point that the back of the building had collapsed, the trim had been removed and the inside was down to the rafters. The Globe and Mail is not revealing the names of the sources because they are not authorized to speak publicly on the matter.

Nonetheless, the Caretaker’s House was considered a heritage property and the NCC decided in 2018 to spend millions of dollars to reconstruct it.

“The original building was dismantled, with heritage components integrated into the new structure, and moved to a site closer to the main cottage,” Mr. Wolff said.

He initially insisted that the new Farmhouse, which from satellite imagery appears much larger than the ramshackle Caretaker’s Cottage, was not a new and bigger building.

“There are no new buildings being constructed. NCC completed rehabilitation and relocation of the old Caretaker’s House,” Mr. Wolff said: “No, it is not bigger. I do reiterate that it is inappropriate, for me, to comment on images that are not our own or that cannot be validated by the NCC.”

However, Mr. Wolff later confirmed that the Farmhouse had indeed been significantly expanded to meet what he called new “building-code standards.”

The floor area of the original Caretaker’s House was 260 square metres. The new building has significantly more floor space.

“It will now be able to accommodate the various needs of visitors, guests and staff at official functions carried out by the head of the government of Canada,” he said. “To achieve these goals – especially as [they] relate to universal accessibility – the design of the reconstructed house required a floor surface of 450 square metres that still features many of the heritage character elements from the original 1850 cottage.”

Mr. Wolff said the overall bill for rehabilitation of the Harrington Lake residence and all its buildings has been estimated to cost $17.8-million of capital investment. So far, $8.6-million has been committed to the effort.

Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre accused officials of obscuring the facts.

“It sounds like they have effectively built the Prime Minister a new waterfront mansion while his old mansion is renovated. And they are trying to cover it up with complicated stories about how they have just moved the caretaker’s derelict cottage up the road,” he said.

“What they should have just said is the Prime Minister needs a lakeside mansion while his existing one is renovated and we’re going to spend $2.5-million to build one.”

NDP MP Charlie Angus criticized the NCC for trying to hide the fact that it had built an entirely new building as a guest house.

“I don’t have a problem with the Prime Minister staying in good, proper digs,” he said. "Why not be upfront and tell us because when you are spending $6-million to fix a cottage and over $2-million to move a guest house and double its size, Canadians have a right to know.”

The country retreat has been a refuge for prime ministers and their families for decades. Former prime minister Brian Mulroney wrote in his memoirs that Harrington Lake was a “place that has brought us much sanctuary in the storms and joy and freedom as a family. Here the kids were happy, Mila was relaxed, and I accordingly, for a while, was able to shuck some of the responsibilities and genuinely enjoy myself with family and friends.”

Mr. Harper once said that he would love to retire at Harrington Lake.

In his memoirs, Common Ground, Mr. Trudeau, who has probably spent more time at the cottage than anyone else, remarked on how special Harrington Lake was to him and his two brothers when his father was prime minister from 1968-1984, except for nine months during Joe Clark’s short-term government.

Mr. Trudeau’s primary residence is Rideau Cottage on the grounds of Rideau Hall, the official residence of the Governor-General. 24 Sussex Drive, which is the official residence of the prime minister, stands empty as there appears to be a lack of political will to either tear down and rebuild or to restore the residence.

The conditions at 24 Sussex are so bad that Mr. Trudeau has not lived there since taking office in 2015. The NCC estimates that the total cost of deferred maintenance at 24 Sussex amounts to $34.5-million, while its replacement value is pegged at almost $38.5-million.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/poli...st-cottage-at/
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  #315  
Old Posted May 8, 2020, 5:19 PM
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"Trudeau's Harrington Lake residence undergoing $8.6M renovation"?

They make it sound like the PM is using taxpayers' dollars to renovate his private cottage.

I for one am glad we're investing in fixing the cottage instead of letting it fall beyond repair like 24 Sussex.
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  #316  
Old Posted May 8, 2020, 5:32 PM
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So in Ottawa, he's living at Rideau Cottage because the PM's residence is not suitable to live in. And at Harrington Lake, he's using the 'Farmhouse' because the PM's residence there is under renovation.

That's a damning situation for the NCC. I understand some of the problem comes from PM's and parties not willing to properly fund the upkeep of the properties. That the parties are so strong that they can destroy government property by promoting neglect and the mandarins so weak that they don't walk away from their trough rather than allow the destruction of government property is a sad statement on the state of affairs.
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  #317  
Old Posted May 8, 2020, 5:39 PM
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Even with Trudeau basically telling the NCC "do what you gotta do", there's been no movement on 24 Sussex in 5 years. Are they waiting for the house to fall down so that they don't have to make the tough decision of preservation vs new build?
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  #318  
Old Posted May 8, 2020, 5:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J.OT13 View Post
"Trudeau's Harrington Lake residence undergoing $8.6M renovation"?

They make it sound like the PM is using taxpayers' dollars to renovate his private cottage.

I for one am glad we're investing in fixing the cottage instead of letting it fall beyond repair like 24 Sussex.
Indeed. Wish they could just get on with 24 Sussex as well.
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  #319  
Old Posted May 13, 2020, 3:57 AM
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Originally Posted by rocketphish View Post
Trudeau's Harrington Lake residence undergoing $8.6M renovation
Misleading headlines like this are exactly what every PM has feared for decades, and the reason why 24 Sussex is in an unlivable state.
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  #320  
Old Posted May 13, 2020, 11:28 AM
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Misleading headlines like this are exactly what every PM has feared for decades, and the reason why 24 Sussex is in an unlivable state.
Gotta get the masses riled up.

True headline would be "One of the Official PM residence's owned by all Canadians given an update"
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